Sly syndrome

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Sly syndrome
Classification and external resources
ICD-10 E76.2
ICD-9 277.5
OMIM 253220
DiseasesDB 8389
eMedicine ped/858
MeSH D016538

Sly syndrome, also called Mucopolysaccharidosis Type VII or MPS, is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease characterized by a deficiency of the enzyme β-glucuronidase, a lysosomal enzyme. Sly syndrome belongs to a group of disorders known as mucopolysaccharidoses, which are lysosomal storage diseases. In Sly syndrome, the deficiency in β-glucuronidase leads to the accumulation of certain complex carbohydrates (mucopolysaccharides) in many tissues and organs of the body.

It was named after its discoverer William S. Sly (1932-), an American Biochemist, in 1969 who has spent nearly his entire academic career at Saint Louis University.[1][2]

Genetics[edit]

Sly syndrome has an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance.

The defective gene responsible for Sly syndrome is located on chromosome 7.[3]

Symptoms[edit]

The symptoms of Sly syndrome are similar to those of Hurler syndrome (MPS I). The symptoms include:

  • in the head, neck, and face: coarse (Hurler-like) facies and macrocephaly, frontal prominence, premature closure of sagittal lambdoid sutures, and J-shaped sella turcica
  • in the eyes: corneal opacity and iris coloboma
  • in the nose: anteverted nostrils and a depressed nostril bridge
  • in the mouth and oral areas: prominent alveolar processes and cleft palate
  • in the thorax: usually pectus carinatum or exacavatum and oar-shaped ribs; also a protruding abdomen and inguinal or umbilical hernia
  • in the extremities: talipes, an underdeveloped ilium, aseptic necrosis of femoral head, and shortness of tubular bones occurs
  • in the spine: kyphosis or scoliosis and hook-like deformities in thoracic and lumbar vertebrate
  • in the bones: dysostosis multiplex

In addition recurrent pulmonary infections occur. Hepatomegaly occurs in the gastrointestinal system. Splenomegaly occurs in the hematopoietic system. Inborn mucopolysaccharide metabolic disorders due to β-glucuronidase deficiency with granular inclusions in granulocytes occurs in the biochemical and metabolic systems. Growth and motor skills are affected, and mental retardation also occurs.

Prevalence[edit]

MPS type VII occurs in less than 1 in 250,000 births.[4]

Other names[edit]

Mucopolysaccharidosis Type VII is also known as β-glucuronidase deficiency, β-glucuronidase deficiency mucopolysaccharidosis, GUSB deficiency, mucopolysaccharide storage disease VII, MCA, and MR.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "slu.edu". Retrieved 2007-12-31. 
  2. ^ Sly WS, Quinton BA, McAlister WH, Rimoin DL (1973). "Beta glucuronidase deficiency: report of clinical, radiologic, and biochemical features of a new mucopolysaccharidosis". J. Pediatr. 82 (2): 249–57. doi:10.1016/S0022-3476(73)80162-3. PMID 4265197. 
  3. ^ Allanson, JE; Gemmill, RM; Hecht, BK; Johnsen, S; Wenger, DA (1988). "Deletion mapping of the beta-glucuronidase gene.". American Journal of Medical Genetics 29 (3): 517–522. doi:10.1002/ajmg.1320290307. PMID 3376995. 
  4. ^ National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke > Mucopolysaccharidoses Fact Sheet Last updated May 06, 2010

External links[edit]