Smooth softshell turtle

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Smooth softshell turtle
Apalone mutica.jpg
Apalone mutica
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Subphylum: Vertebrata
Class: Reptilia
Order: Testudines
Suborder: Cryptodira
Family: Trionychidae
Genus: Apalone
Species: A. mutica
Binomial name
Apalone mutica
(Le Sueur, 1827)[1]
Synonyms[2]
  • Trionyx muticus Le Sueur, 1827
  • Aspidonectes muticus
    Wagler, 1830
  • Gymnopus muticus
    Duméril, Bibron & Duméril, 1854
  • Amyda mutica Agassiz, 1857
  • Trionyx muticus – Webb, 1959
  • Apolone mutica – Meylan, 1987
Apalone mutica mutica
  • Trionyx pusilla Rafinesque, 1822
  • Trionyx muticus LeSueur, 1827
  • Aspidonectes muticus Wagler, 1830
  • Gymnopus muticus Duméril, Bibron & Duméril, 1854
  • Amyda mutica Agassiz, 1857
  • Potamochelys microcephalus Gray, 1864
  • Callinia microcephala Gray, 1869
  • Potamochelys microcephala Boulenger, 1889
  • Trionyx muticus muticus Webb, 1959
  • Apalone mutica Meylan, 1987
  • Apalone muticus Meylan & Webb, 1988
  • Apalone mutica mutica Ernst & Barbour, 1989
  • Apalone mutica mutica Stubbs, 1989
  • Trionix muticus Richard, 1999
Apalone mutica calvata
  • Trionyx pusilla Rafinesque, 1822
  • Trionyx muticus calvatus Webb, 1959
  • Apalone mutica calvata Ernst & Barbour, 1989
  • Apalone mutica calvata Stubbs, 1989

The smooth softshell turtle (Apalone mutica) is a softshell turtle of the family Trionychidae. It is endemic to North America.

Geographic range[edit]

It lives mainly in the Mississippi River drainage, including the Ohio River and the lower Allegheny River.

Description[edit]

The smooth softshell turtle is usually brown or olive-colored, often with darker dots or dashes. It is the only softshell without ridges in the nostrils. Females are 18-35.6 cm (7-14 inches); males, 12.5-17.8 cm (5-7 inches).

Reproduction[edit]

From May to July, the females lay bunches of three to 28 eggs about 100 m from water in sandy areas.[3]

Sympatric species[edit]

Apalone mutica is sympatric with the spiny softsl turtle (Apalone spinifera) over much of its range.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ ITIS.gov
  2. ^ Fritz Uwe; Peter Havaš (2007). "Checklist of Chelonians of the World". Vertebrate Zoology 57 (2): 306. ISSN 18640-5755. Archived from the original on 2010-12-17. Retrieved 29 May 2012. 
  3. ^ DNr.wi.gov
  4. ^ JSTOR.org