Snåsa

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Snåsa kommune
Snåasen tjielte
Municipality
View of Snåsa over Snåsavatnet
View of Snåsa over Snåsavatnet
Coat of arms of Snåsa kommune
Coat of arms
Official logo of Snåsa kommune
Nord-Trøndelag within
Norway
Snåsa within Nord-Trøndelag
Snåsa within Nord-Trøndelag
Coordinates: 64°13′28″N 12°37′31″E / 64.22444°N 12.62528°E / 64.22444; 12.62528Coordinates: 64°13′28″N 12°37′31″E / 64.22444°N 12.62528°E / 64.22444; 12.62528
Country Norway
County Nord-Trøndelag
District Innherad
Administrative centre Snåsa
Government
 • Mayor (2003) Vigdis Hjulstad Belbo (Sp)
Area
 • Total 2,342.66 km2 (904.51 sq mi)
 • Land 2,150.34 km2 (830.25 sq mi)
 • Water 192.32 km2 (74.26 sq mi)
Area rank 20 in Norway
Population (2011)
 • Total 2,172
 • Rank 318 in Norway
 • Density 1.0/km2 (3/sq mi)
 • Change (10 years) -7.9 %
Demonym Snåsning[1]
Time zone CET (UTC+1)
 • Summer (DST) CEST (UTC+2)
ISO 3166 code NO-1736
Official language form Neutral
Website www.snasa.kommune.no
Data from Statistics Norway

Snåsa (Southern Sami: Snåase) is a municipality in Nord-Trøndelag county, Norway. It is part of the Innherred region. The administrative centre of the municipality is the village of Snåsa. Other villages include Agle and Jørstad.

Snåsa is one of the last strongholds for the seriously endangered Southern Sami language.

The village of Snåsa is the municipal center of the municipality. It lies at the eastern end of the lake Snåsavatnet. The 1.42-square-kilometre (350-acre) village has a population (2011) of 676. The population density is 476 inhabitants per square kilometre (1,230/sq mi).[2] The village is where Snåsa Church and Snåsa Station are both located.

General information[edit]

Snåsa was established as a municipality on 1 January 1838 (see formannskapsdistrikt). The eastern district of Lierne was separated from Snåsa on 1 January 1874 to form a separate municipality. Snåsa's boundaries have not changed since then.[3]

Name[edit]

The Old Norse form of the name was Snǫs. The name is identical with the word snös which means "prominent mountain" or "overhanging rock" (possibly referring to the mountain of Bergsåsen, at the inner end of the lake Snåsavatnet). The name was spelled Snaasen until the early 20th century.[4] The Southern Sami language version of the name is Snåasen tjielte, which was officially accepted in 2010 as an alternate name for the Norwegian: Snåsa kommune.[5]

Coat-of-arms[edit]

The coat-of-arms is from modern times; they were granted in 1994. The arms show a yellow Lady Slipper orchid (Cypripedium calceolus) on a blue background. This particular flower is prevalent throughout the municipality.[5]

Churches[edit]

The Church of Norway has one parish (sokn) within the municipality of Snåsa. It is part of the Nord-Innherad deanery and the Diocese of Nidaros.

Churches in Snåsa
Parish
(Sokn)
Church Name Location
of the Church
Year Built
Snåsa Snåsa Church Snåsa 1200

Geography[edit]

View of the lake Snåsavatnet

Snåsa is located about 180 kilometres (110 mi) northeast of the city of Trondheim, and it borders Sweden to the southeast. Snåsa borders the municipalities of Overhalla, Grong, and Lierne in the north and east, and Steinkjer and Verdal in the west and south. The 6th largest lake in the country, Snåsavatnet, is partly located in the municipality. Other lakes include Andorsjøen, Bangsjøene, Grøningen, Holderen, and Store Øyingen. The Blåfjella–Skjækerfjella National Park covers a lot of the eastern part of the municipality.

Transportation[edit]

The European route E6 highway runs through the municipality on the north side of the Snåsavatnet lake and the Nordlandsbanen railway line runs along the south side of the lake. The train stops at Jørstad Station and Snåsa Station.

Media gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Personnemningar til stadnamn i Noreg" (in Norwegian). Språkrådet. 
  2. ^ Statistisk sentralbyrå (1 January 2011). "Urban settlements. Population and area, by municipality.". 
  3. ^ Jukvam, Dag (1999). "Historisk oversikt over endringer i kommune- og fylkesinndelingen" (in Norwegian). Statistisk sentralbyrå. 
  4. ^ Rygh, Oluf (1903). Norske gaardnavne: Nordre Trondhjems amt (dokpro.uio.no) (in Norwegian) (15 ed.). Kristiania, Norge: W. C. Fabritius & sønners bogtrikkeri. p. 273. 
  5. ^ a b Store norske leksikon. "Snåsa" (in Norwegian). Retrieved 2011-08-05. 

External links[edit]