Snoops (1999 TV series)

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This article is about the 1999 Kelley TV series. For 1989 crime/comedy show, see Snoops (1989 TV series).
Snoops
Snoops cast photo.jpg
Principal cast of Snoops
Genre Comedy-drama
Created by David E. Kelley
Written by Adam Armus
Nat Bernstein
Elizabeth Cosin
Michael Green
Paul Guyot
Hart Hanson
Mitchel Katlin
Molly Newman
Kim Newton
Everett Owens
Directed by Allan Arkush
Miguel Arteta
Arvin Brown
Dennie Gordon
Michael Lange
Joe Napolitano
Bethany Rooney
Ian Sander
Starring Gina Gershon
Paula Marshall
Danny Nucci
Paula Jai Parker
Edward Kerr
Theme music composer Lisa Coleman
Wendy Melvoin
Composer(s) Lisa Coleman
Wendy Melvoin
Country of origin United States
Original language(s) English
No. of seasons 1
No. of episodes 13
(3 unaired in the U.S.)
Production
Executive producer(s) David E. Kelley
John Tinker
Producer(s) Allan Arkush
Neil Mandelberg
Kim Newton
Jack Philbrick
Running time 45–48 minutes
Production company(s) David E. Kelley Productions
20th Century Fox Television
Distributor 20th Television
Broadcast
Original channel ABC
Audio format Stereo
Original run September 26 – December 19, 1999 (1999-12-19)

Snoops is an American comedy-drama television series that aired on ABC. The series, which aired from September 26, 1999 to December 19, 1999 (the final three episodes were unaired in the U.S.), was created by David E. Kelley. Snoops came about during the height of Kelley's fame, with both The Practice and Ally McBeal sustaining large audiences.

Synopsis[edit]

Snoops focuses on a less-than-conventional detective agency, Glenn Hall, Inc., headed by Glenn Hall (Gina Gershon). Her staff included Roberta Young (Paula Jai Parker), a detective who goes to great lengths to get the job done; Manny Lott (Danny Nucci), the resident technology wiz; and Dana Plant (Paula Marshall), a former Santa Monica police detective.

Although the series garnered good ratings initially (Snoops averaged 11.5 million viewers, tying NBC in the ratings[1]), it soon faltered and was cancelled quickly. Only ten of the thirteen episodes produced aired in the United States, while the final three episodes aired overseas. The final episode, which was rewritten by Kelley after the cancellation announcement, served as a series finale.

After the series was canceled, the character of Glenn Hall would later appear in an episode of the final season of The Practice entitled "The Firm". Series creator David E. Kelley later cast Jessalyn Gilsig on his FOX series Boston Public, and also cast one-time Snoops guest star Emmy Rossum in a multi-episode arc of The Practice.

Cast[edit]

Guest stars[edit]

Episodes[edit]

  1. Pilot (September 26, 1999) – Former cop Dana Plant unwittingly finds herself with a job at Glenn Hall Inc., where civil rights and the constitution come second to solving crimes, but finds herself still having to deal with former cop partner Greg McCormack.
  2. "Singer in the Band" (October 3, 1999) – Roberta gets personally involved in a case against a deadbeat dad, while Glenn goes undercover as a country music singer.
  3. "Bedfellas" (October 10, 1999) – While Manny attempts to outwit a con artist, Glenn gets in deep when she discovers her new boyfriend has mafia connections.
  4. "Higher Calling" (October 17, 1999) – Glenn and Dana go undercover as prostitutes to prevent a political scandal, while Manny helps a priest who is being blackmailed. Priscilla Barnes and David Dukes guest star. Cameo appearances by Bill Maher, Arianna Huffington and Jane Krakowski playing themselves in a scene incorporating a clip of the issue-based talk show Politically Incorrect.[2]
  5. "The Heartless Bitch" (October 24, 1999) – Manny and Roberta investigate what seems to be a simple case of infidelity, while Glenn and Dana search for the recipient of a widower's wife's heart.
  6. "Separation Anxiety" (October 31, 1999) – While Dana fears for her life when she gets a stalker, Glenn helps a 14-year-old girl named Caroline Beels (Emmy Rossum) find her biological mother.
  7. "Constitution" (November 21, 1999) – The agency gets involved in the complicated life of a family which may include murderers and gay bashers.
  8. "True Believers" (November 28, 1999) – Back on the force, Dana is annoyed when her first case involves working with Greg and the agency to investigate a mysterious kidnapping.
  9. "The Grinch" (December 12, 1999) – Glenn searches for a man stealing Christmas presents, while Manny is asked to assist a man in killing his wife.
  10. "A Criminal Mind" (December 19, 1999) – Glenn and Dana are confused when a clue from a hypnotized man leads them to a murder victim, while Roberta and Manny join forces with a bounty hunter.
  11. "Blood Lines" (December 17, 2000) – Glenn is reunited with Caroline, who needs a donor for leukemia treatment. Glenn follows a trail to a possible organ match, who will only participate if rape charges against him are dropped. And a tragedy unfolds as Dana tries to help a mentally disabled office worker at the police station, who is caught in a drug deal. However, events spiral out of control, ending in Dana's death.
  12. "The Stolen Diskette" (December 24, 2000) – FBI Agent Suzanne Shivers joins forces with Glenn to track down a disk with important mob information on it, only to find herself intrigued by the agency. And Greg leaves the force in the wake of Dana's death.
  13. "Swan Chant" (December 31, 2000) – Glenn and Suzanne take care of a singer who is trying to rid herself of her drug addiction. Against Glenn's will, Manny takes a case of a contested will that may involve the ownership of the agency. When the case goes wrong, a millionaire's widow takes over the agency. The series ends with Suzanne and Roberta finding jobs elsewhere, and Glenn leaving the agency to go on a music tour.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Wolk, Josh (1999-11-02). "Fall Guys : The Winners and Losers of the New TV Season". ew.com. Retrieved 2008-11-21. 
  2. ^ "Snoops: Season 1, Episode 4 - Higher Calling (17 October 1999)". IMDb.com. Retrieved 2013-10-02. 

External links[edit]