Snowden Ashford

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Snowden Ashford
Born 1866
Washington, D.C.
Died 1927
Washington, D.C.
Nationality American
Occupation Architect
Engine Company 12, Washington, D.C.

Snowden Ashford (1866-1927) was an American architect who worked in Washington, D.C.. He was born January 1, 1866, in Washington, D.C. Ashford was educated at Rittenhouse academy and at the Christian Brothers Roman Catholic school. He studied architecture at Lafayette college and, upon graduation, entered the office of A.B. Mullet, who had formerly been supervising architect of the United States Treasury. Ashford entered the District service in 1895 and became Washington's first municipal architect.[1] The Washington Post characterized him as "Architect of the Everyday", and noted: "Ashford designed or supervised everything the District built between 1895 and 1921, including the North Hall at the Eastern Market. But he was most proud of his schools."[2]

A number of his works are listed on the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP).

Works include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Snowden Ashford, Long Civic Leader, Dead in Hospital" The Washington Post, January 27, 1927, p. 9.
  2. ^ Architect of the Everyday, Washington Post, November 6, 2005
  3. ^ Rodney S. Collins (July 10, 1980). "National Register of Historic Places Nomination: Samuel Taylor Suit Cottage PDF (5.79 MB)". National Park Service. 
  4. ^ "Replace or Modernize? The Future of the District of Columbia's Endangered Old and Historic Public Schools: Ellington School for the Arts". 21st Century School Fund. May 2001. Retrieved 2 January 2014. 
  5. ^ "Replace or Modernize? The Future of the District of Columbia's Endangered Old and Historic Public Schools: Eastern Senior High School". 21st Century School Fund. May 2001. Retrieved 2 January 2014. 
  6. ^ "Replace or Modernize? The Future of the District of Columbia's Endangered Old and Historic Public Schools: Margaret Murray Washington Career Senior High School". 21st Century School Fund. May 2001. Retrieved 2 January 2014. 

External links[edit]