Social firm

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Social Firm is the British term for a work integration social enterprise (WISE), a business created to employ people who have a disability or are otherwise disadvantaged in the labour market. Its commercial and production activities are undertaken in the context of a social mission, with profits going back into the company to further its goals. A significant number of the employees of social firms will be people with a disability or disadvantage, including psychiatric disabilities. The firms grew out of disillusionment with mainstream businesses, and the failure to recognise or enable everyone's potential. All workers are paid a market-rate wage or salary that is appropriate to the work. All employees are intended to have the same employment opportunities, rights and obligations.

History[edit]

The original social firms were established well before the term came into use in 1980s. Firms in Europe started to prosper and employ increasing numbers of people with a disability. Schemes, and coordinating organisations, became more established and numerous in the 1990 [1]

Iain Duncan Smith visited Pluss, a social firm in Exeter, which makes cushions for wheelchairs and car upholstery, in March 2015. The firm is owned by four councils: Devon, Plymouth, Somerset and Torbay and is facing potential closure of its manufacturing operations in Exeter and Bridgwater, and rationalisation of corporate services could result in up to 75 redundancies.[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Grove, B., Harding, A., Freudenberg, M and O’Flynn, D. (1997). Social Firms: New Directions in the Employment, Rehabilitation and Integration of People with Mental Health Problems. London, Pavilion
  2. ^ "Iain Duncan Smith 'insults' disabled workers at factory facing the axe". Daily Mirror. 31 March 2015. Retrieved 1 April 2015. 

External links[edit]