Society for Mathematical Biology

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

The Society for Mathematical Biology (SMB) is an international association co-founded in 1972 in USA by Drs.George Karreman, Herbert Daniel Landahl and (initially chaired) by Anthony Bartholomay for the furtherance of joint scientific activities between Mathematics and Biology research communities,.[1][2] SMB publishes the "Bulletin of Mathematical Biology" (ISSN 1522–9602),[3][4] as well as the SMB annual newsletter.[5]

History of The Society for Mathematical Biology[edit]

The Society for Mathematical Biology emerged and grew from the earlier school of mathematical biophysics, initiated and supported by the Founder of Mathematical Biology, Nicolas Rashevsky.[6][7] Thus, the roots of SMB go back to the publication in 1939 of the first international journal of mathematical biology, previously entitled "The Bulletin of Mathematical Biophysics"-- which was founded by Nicolas Rashevsky, and which is currently published by SMB under the name of "Bulletin of Mathematical Biology".[8] Professor Rashevsky also founded in 1969 the non-profit organization "Mathematical Biology, Incorporated"--the precursor of SMB. Another notable member of the University of Chicago school of mathematical biology was Anatol Rapoport whose major interests were in developing basic concepts in the related area of mathematical sociology, who cofounded the Society for General Systems Research and became a president of the latter society in 1965. Herbert D. Landahl was initially also a member of Rashevsky's school of mathematical biology, and became the second president of SMB in the 1980s; both Herbert Landahl and Robert Rosen from Rashevsky's research group were focused on dynamical systems approaches to complex systems biology, with the latter researcher becoming in 1980 the president of the Society for General Systems Research.

Research and educational activities[edit]

In addition to its research and news publications, The Society for Mathematical Biology supports education in: mathematical biology, mathematical biophysics, complex systems biology and theoretical biology through sponsorship of several topic-focused graduate and postdoctoral courses. To encourage and stimulate young researchers in this relatively new and rapidly developing field of mathematical biology The Society for Mathematical Biology awards several prizes, as well as lists regularly new open international opportunities for researchers and students in this field.[9]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Conrad, Michael (September 1996). "SMB – "Childhood, Boyhood, Youth."". Society for Mathematical Biology Newsletter. Retrieved 2009-06-25. 
  2. ^ http://www.smb.org/governance/history.shtml History of SMB
  3. ^ "Bulletin of Mathematical Biology". Springer New York. Retrieved 2009-06-25. 
  4. ^ http://people.maths.ox.ac.uk/maini/PKM%20publications/170.pdf "Bulletin of Mathematical Biology—Facts, Figures and Comparisons.", by Philip K. Maini, Santiago Schnell and Sara Jolliffee., Bulletin of Mathematical Biology (2004) 66, 595–603, doi:10.1016/j.bulm.2004.03.003
  5. ^ http://www.smb.org/publications/index.shtml SMB Publications
  6. ^ Rosen, Robert. 1972. "Tribute to Nicolas Rashevsky" 1899-1972. Progress in Theoretical Biology 2.
  7. ^ Conrad, Michael (September 1996). "SMB – CHILDHOOD, BOYHOOD, YOUTH". Society for Mathematical Biology Newsletter. Retrieved 2009-06-25. 
  8. ^ The Bulletin of Mathematical Biophysics
  9. ^ http://www.smb.org/prizes/index.shtml SMB Mathematical Biology Prize Awards

Further reading[edit]

  • Nicolas Rashevsky. 1965. The Representation of Organisms in Terms of Predicates, Bulletin of Mathematical Biophysics 27: 477–491.
  • Nicolas Rashevsky. 1969, Outline of a Unified Approach to Physics, Biology and Sociology., Bulletin of Mathematical Biophysics 31: 159–198.
  • Elsasser, M.W.: 1981, A Form of Logic Suited for Biology., In: Robert, Rosen, ed., Progress in Theoretical Biology, Volume 6, Academic Press, New York and London, pp. 23–62.
  • Rosen, R. 1958a, A Relational Theory of Biological Systems., Bulletin of Mathematical Biophysics 20: 245–260.
  • Rosen, R. 1958b, The Representation of Biological Systems from the Standpoint of the Theory of Categories., Bulletin of Mathematical Biophysics 20: 317–341.
  • Warren McCulloch and Walter Pitts, "A Logical Calculus of Ideas Immanent in Nervous Activity", 1943, Bulletin of Mathematical Biophysics 5:115-133.
  • Warren McCulloch and Walter Pitts, "On how we know universals: The perception of auditory and visual forms", 1947, Bulletin of Mathematical Biophysics 9:127-147.
  • Santiago Schnell, Ramon Grima and Philip K. Maini. 2007. Multiscale modeling in biology. American Scientist 95: 134-142.

External links[edit]