Society for the Study of Evolution

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The Society for the Study of Evolution is a professional organization of evolutionary biologists. It was formed in the United States in 1946 to promote evolution and the integration of various fields of science concerned with evolution and to organize the publication of a scientific journal to report on new research on evolution across a variety of fields.

The Society was established at a meeting in St. Louis on March 30, 1946. Fifty-seven scientists attended the meeting, which was chaired by Alfred E. Emerson. George Gaylord Simpson was elected as the Society's first President, with E. B. Babcock, Emerson, and J. T. Patterson as his Vice-presidents and Ernst Mayr as secretary.[1] This society grew as an extension of the US National Research Council's Committee on Common Problems of Genetics and Paleontology (later renamed the Committee on Common Problems of Genetics, Paleontology and Systematics).[2]

The first annual meeting of the society was held in Boston, December 28–31, 1946. A grant from the American Philosophical Society led to the publication of the journal Evolution.

Commonly known as 'evolution meeting,' the annual conference is often held together with the Society of Systematic Biologists and the American Society of Naturalists.

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  1. ^ Cain, Joseph. 1994. Ernst Mayr as community architect: launching the Society for the Study of Evolution and the journal Evolution. Biology and Philosophy 9: 387-427; Cain, Joe. 2000. For the 'promotion' and 'integration' of various fields: first years of Evolution, 1947-1949. Archives of Natural History 27: 231-259.
  2. ^ Cain, Joe, ed. 2004. Exploring the borderlands: documents of the Committee on Common Problems of Genetics, Paleontology, and Systematics, 1943-1944. Transactions of the American Philosophical Society. 94: xlii + 160; Cain, Joe. 2002. Epistemic and community transition in American evolutionary studies: the 'Committee on Common Problems of Genetics, Paleontology, and Systematics' (1942-1949). Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences. 33: 283-313.

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