Society of Graphical and Allied Trades

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The SOGAT crest
The former SOGAT House at Oval, London. Photo taken July 2007

The Society of Graphical and Allied Trades (SOGAT) was a British trade union in the printing industry.

SOGAT was formed in 1966 by the National Union of Printing, Bookbinding and Paper Workers and the National Society of Operative Printers and Assistants (NATSOPA). The National Union of Printing, Bookbinding and Paper Workers became the Society of Graphical and Allied Trades Division A and NATSOPA became the Society of Graphical and Allied Trades Division 1. The aim was to achieve a complete merger over time, but differences led to in-fighting and in 1970 the two divisions split, Division A retaining the name Society of Graphical and Allied Trades and Division 1 becoming the National Society of Operative Printers, Graphical and Media Personnel (but retaining the NATSOPA acronym).

In 1975, SOGAT officially became the Society of Graphical and Allied Trades 1975 (SOGAT '75) after amalgamation with the Scottish Graphical Association. In 1982, SOGAT '75 and NATSOPA finally amalgamated to become the Society of Graphical and Allied Trades 1982 (SOGAT '82). In 1992, SOGAT '82 merged with the National Graphical Association to form the Graphical, Paper and Media Union, which subsequently merged with Amicus to become that union's Graphical, Paper and Media industrial sector.

Brenda Dean was general secretary of SOGAT '82 from 1985 to 1992.

Closed Shop[edit]

"A SOGAT member ... working in a pre-entry shop [where an employee had to be a member of the union before getting a job], authorized his employer to deduct his union dues from his wage packet. Due to an administrative error by his union, his authorization was not implemented. He fell into arrears, was expelled from the union and lost his job". He was readmitted following legal action.[1]

General Secretaries[edit]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Dunn, Stephen & Gennard, John (1984). The Closed Shop in British Industry. London and Basingstoke. p. 135.