Sodium metavanadate

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Sodium vanadate
Names
IUPAC name
Sodium trioxovanadate(V)
Other names
Sodium vanadate
Metamunirite
Munirite
Identifiers
13718-26-8 YesY
ChEBI CHEBI:75221 N
EC number 237-272-7
Jmol-3D images Image
PubChem 4148882
RTECS number YW1050000
Properties
NaVO3
Molar mass 121.9295 g/mol
Appearance yellow crystalline solid
hygroscopic
Density 5.15 g/cm3
Melting point 630 °C (1,166 °F; 903 K)
19.3 g/100 mL (20 °C)
40.8 g/100 mL (80 °C)
Thermochemistry
97.6 J/mol K
113.8 J/mol K
-1148 kJ/mol
Hazards
Main hazards Toxic, irritant
EU Index Not listed
NFPA 704
Flammability code 0: Will not burn. E.g., water Health code 2: Intense or continued but not chronic exposure could cause temporary incapacitation or possible residual injury. E.g., chloroform Reactivity code 0: Normally stable, even under fire exposure conditions, and is not reactive with water. E.g., liquid nitrogen Special hazards (white): no codeNFPA 704 four-colored diamond
Flash point Non-flammable
98 mg/kg (rat, oral)
Related compounds
Other anions
Sodium orthovanadate
Other cations
Potassium metavanadate
Ammonium metavanadate
Related compounds
Vanadium pentoxide
Except where noted otherwise, data is given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C (77 °F), 100 kPa)
 N verify (what isYesY/N?)
Infobox references

Sodium metavanadate is a yellow solid which is soluble in water. Its use is limited to its hygroscopic property. Its natural forms include mineral metamunirite (anhydrous) and a dihydrate, munirite. Both are very rare, metamunirite is now known only from V- and U-bearing sandstone formations of central-western USA and munirite from Pakistan and South Africa.[1]

References[edit]