Soham Swami

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Soham Swami
Shyamakanta.jpg
Born Shyamakanta Bandyopadhyay
Dhaka, Bengal, British India
Died 5 December 1918
Nainital, United Provinces, British India
Guru Tibbetibaba
Philosophy Advaita Vedanta
Prominent Disciple(s) Niralamba Swami

Soham Swami (Bengali: সোহং স্বামী )(Hindi:सोऽहं स्वामी ) or Tiger Swami was a great guru and yogi of India. He lived before the first quarter of the twentieth century (his last book ′Common Sense′ was published in 1923 after his death. Originally named as Shyamakanta Bandopaddhyaya, he was Advaita Vedantic disciple of Tibbetibaba. Tibbetibaba was a great yogi and guru of India.[1]

Born as Shyamakanta Bandopaddhyaya, he was Tibbetibaba's Advaita Vedantic disciple. Soham Swami had ashram in both in Nainital and Haridwar. He was born at Autsahi in Dhaka district (now in Munshiganj district) in Dhaka Division, Bangladesh and was one of pioneers of physical prowess of modern Bengal.[2][3] He had so much physical strength that he could wrestle even tigers.[4] Due to this reason came to be known as Tiger Swami. But this tiger bouts took place before he entered into the spiritual path.[5]

Soham Swami had ashram in both in Nainital and Haridwar. It was at the Nainital ashram, Niralamba Swami became his disciple.[6] In his early life Niralamba Swami, also known as Jatindra Nath Banerjee, was a great freedom fighter of India.[7][8]

Life[edit]

Shyamakanta was born at Arial village near Munsigung in modern-day Bangladesh, although their family originally hailed from Fulia, Nadia district, Paschimbanga (West Bengal). His father Shashibhushan Bandyopadhyay was a clerk at a Tripura court. He spent his childhood in Dhaka where he studied at Dhaka Collegiate School. When he was in college, he started bodybuilding at the akhara of Adhar Ghosh at Lakshmibazar, Dhaka. Later he wanted to be a soldier, but he was barred from entering into the British Indian Army.[9]

After that he was appointed the bodyguard of Maharaja Bir Chandra Manikya Bahadur of Tripura. Later he left the job and joined Barishal Zilla School as a gymnasium trainer. Soon he left that job also and started a circus.[9]

In 1899, he left home to become a monk. He was initiated by Nabin Chandra Chakrabarty(Tibbetibaba), a Vedantic monk who renamed Shyamakanta as ″Soham Swami″.[9]

Shyamakanta set up his Ashrama at Bhaowali near Nainital in modern-day Uttarakhand, India. Soham Swami died at Bhaowaliat his Nainital ashram on 5 December 1918.[9][10] The last book written by him was published after his death.[9][11][12] His samadhi(tomb) is located at Palitpur, Burdwan, India.There is also a symbolic samadhi at his Nainital ashram. It is due to the fact that after his mahasamadhi or death at his Nainital ashram, his last remains were brought to the Palitpur ashram of Tibbetibaba and a samadhi(tomb)was built at the Palitpur ashram.[13]

Ashram[edit]

Soham Swami had established two ashrams - one at Nainital and the other at Haridwar. The Haridwar ashram is known as 'Soham Ashram'. It is located at Bhupatwal in Haridwar.[14][15]

Written works[edit]

The writings of Soham Swami include books named:

  • Soham Gita: This book contains teachings of Soham Swami.It is a poem on philosophy.[9][16]
  • Soham Samhita: This book contains teachings of Soham Swami.[9]
  • Common Sense: This book attempts to prove that all religions of the world are full of absurdities, inconsistencies, and fallacies. In this book the importance of development of common sense and realization of divinity in all beings is stressed. This book was first published in 1923.[17][18][19]
  • Truth: This book was the only book written by him in English poetry. It was published in Calcutta, now Kolkata, in 1913.[9][20]

His other notable works included: Soham Tattwa, Vivekgatha, Bhagavat Gitar Samalochana etc.[9]

Teachings[edit]

  • In human beings body consciousness gives rise to the pride of body. This pride is the greatest enemy of human beings. By Self-knowledge one gets rid of this pride.
Samadhi(tomb) of Soham Swami
  • Equanimity comes after one transcends body consciousness.
  • Causes of emotions like fear and shame are the false association of Self or Atman (soul) with the body and mind. When one gets knowledge that Self or Atman (soul) is different from body or mind, then these emotions disappear.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Sharma, I. Mallikarjuna, “In retrospect: Sagas of heroism and sacrifice of Indian revolutionaries”, Ravi Sasi Enterprises, India (edition: 1999). p. 94. Page Available [1]
  2. ^ Mukherjee, Jayasree, “The Ramakrishna-Vivekananda movement impact on Indian society and politics (1893-1922): with special reference to Bengal”, Firma KLM. (edition 1997). ISBN 81-7102-057-7. p.255. Page available:[2]
  3. ^ Brahmachari, Akhandananda, Paramhamsa Tibbati Babar Smriti Katha(Reminiscences of Tibbetibaba),(Bengali edition), India: Tibbati Baba Vedanta Ashram, 76/3, Taantipara Lane, P.O. Santragachi, Howrah – 711 104, West Bengal (May, 2003), p.28
  4. ^ Murphet, Howard, Sai Baba: Man of Miracles, Weiser Boo Publication, (1977). ISBN 0-87728-335-4, p. 152. Page available [3]
  5. ^ Yogananda, Sri Sri Paramahansa, Autobiography of a Yogi, Yogoda Satsang Society Of India (1997) ISBN 81-7224-121-6. p.49 and 57
  6. ^ Heehs, Peter, “The bomb in Bengal: the rise of revolutionary terrorism in India, 1900-1910”, Oxford University Press. (edition 1993). p. 62. Page available: [4]
  7. ^ [5]
  8. ^ Jadavpur University. Dept. of International Relations Jadavpur Journal of International Relations, “Jadavpur Journal of International Relations”, Dept. of International Relations, Jadavpur University, Kolkata, India. (edition: 2001). pp.117 and 122. Page Available: [6]
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h i Ghosh, Anil Chandra (2008) [1928]. ব্যায়ামে বাঙালী — Byamame Bangali [Physical Exercise and the Bengalis] (in Bengali) (9th ed.). Kolkata: Presidency Library. pp. 1–8. ISBN 81-89466-04-6. 
  10. ^ Brahmachari, Akhandananda, Paramhamsa Tibbati Babar Smriti Katha(Reminiscences of Tibbetibaba),(Bengali edition), India: Tibbati Baba Vedanta Ashram, 76/3, Taantipara Lane, P.O. Santragachi, Howrah – 711 104, West Bengal (May, 2003), p.31
  11. ^ Luzac & Co. (London, England), Luzac's oriental list and book review, Luzac and Co.. (edition 1924). p. 33. Page available: [7]
  12. ^ Swami, Soham, "Common Sense", Bangladesh: Surja Kanta Banerjee, Gandharia Press, Dacca(Dhaka) (ed. 1923). p. 4.
  13. ^ Brahmachari, Akhandananda, Paramhamsa Tibbati Babar Smriti Katha(Reminiscences of Tibbetibaba),(Bengali edition), India: Tibbati Baba Vedanta Ashram, 76/3, Taantipara Lane, P.O. Santragachi, Howrah – 711 104, West Bengal (May, 2003), p.48
  14. ^ http://www.haridwarrishikeshtourism.com/haridwar-ashrams.html
  15. ^ http://www.hillsguide.com/garhwal/haridwar/ashram.htm
  16. ^ Ghose, Aurobindo, Karmayogin: political writings and speeches 1909-1910. Volume 8 of The Complete Works of Sri Aurobindo , Volume 8 of Works, Sri Aurobindo Ashram Publication Dept, India. (ed. 1997) p.196. Page available: [8]
  17. ^ Luzac & Co. (London, England), “Luzac's oriental list and book review”, Luzac and Co.. (edition 1924). p. 33. Page available: [9]
  18. ^ Swami, Soham, "Common Sense", Bangladesh: Surja Kanta Banerjee, Gandharia Press, Dacca(Dhaka) (ed. 1923). pp. 1-3.
  19. ^ University of Calcutta. Dept. of English, “Calcutta review”, University of Calcutta, University of Calcutta. Dept. of English, Kolkata, India (ed. 1925). p.20. Page available: [10]
  20. ^ A Bibliography of Indian English, Central Institute of English and Foreign Languages, India. (edition 1972). p.97.

References[edit]

  • Ghosh, Sudhanshu Ranjan, "Bharater Sadhak O Sadhika"(Bengali edition), India: Tuli Kalam Publication, 1, College Row, Kolkata – 700 009 (1992.Bengali calendar year – 1399), pp. 318–343
  • Chakravorty, Subodh, "Bharater Sadhak – Sadhika"(Bengali edition), India: Kamini Publication, 115, Akhil Mistry Lane, Kolkata – 700 009 (1997.Bengali calendar year – 1404), Volume 1, pp. 450–478 and 500-522
  • Murphet, Howard, Sai Baba: Man of Miracles, Weiser Boo Publication, (1977). ISBN 0-87728-335-4, p. 152.
  • Sanyal, Jagadiswar, Guide To Indian Philosophy (1996 ed.), India: Sribhumi Publishing Company (1999), 79, Mahatma Gandhi Road, Kolkata - 700 009.
  • Hornby, A S, "Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary of Current English" (5th ed.), UK: Oxford University Press (1998). ISBN 0-19-431445-6, pp. 1433–1475.
  • Why I am an Atheist: Bhagat Singh, People's Publishing House, New Delhi, India.
  • Swami, Soham, "Common Sense", Bangladesh: Surja Kanta Banerjee, Gandharia Press, Dacca(Dhaka) (1923). pp. 1–3.
  • Misra, Kunjeshwar, Tibbatibabar Parichay(Bengali edition), India: Tibbati Baba Vedanta Ashram, 76/3, Taantipara Lane, P.O. Santragachi, Howrah – 711 104, West Bengal (1934. Bengali calendar year – 1341), pp. 1–60
  • Brahmachari, Akhandananda, Paramhamsa Tibbati Babar Smriti Katha(Bengali edition), India: Tibbati Baba Vedanta Ashram, 76/3, Taantipara Lane, P.O. Santragachi, Howrah – 711 104, West Bengal (May, 2003), pp. 1–50
  • Sharma, I. Mallikarjuna, “In retrospect: Sagas of heroism and sacrifice of Indian revolutionaries”, Ravi Sasi Enterprises, India (edition: 1999). p. 94.
  • Roy Dilip Kumar, Devi Indira, “Pilgrims of the stars: autobiography of two yogis”, India (edition: 1985). p. 357.
  • Majumdar, Bimanbehari, “Militant nationalism in India and its socio-religious background, 1897-1917”, General Printers & Publishers, India (edition 1966.) p. 101.
  • Keshavmurti, “Sri Aurobindo, the hope of man”, Dipti Publications, India. (edition 1969). p. 258.
  • Heehs, Peter, “The bomb in Bengal: the rise of revolutionary terrorism in India, 1900-1910”, Oxford University Press. (edition 1993). p. 62.
  • “A bibliography of Indian English”, Central Institute of English and Foreign Languages, India. (edition 1972). p. 97.
  • Luzac & Co. (London, England), “Luzac's oriental list and book review”, Luzac and Co. (edition 1924). p. 33.
  • Mukherjee, Jayasree, “The Ramakrishna-Vivekananda movement impact on Indian society and politics (1893-1922): with special reference to Bengal”, Firma KLM. (edition 1997). ISBN 81-7102-057-7. p. 255.