Solano County, California

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Solano County
County
Solanocountygovoffice.jpg CABeniciaCapitol0152.jpg
Suisun City Marina and City Hall.jpg Lockheed C-5 Galaxy take off.jpg
Vacaville Hills.jpg
Images, from top down, left to right: The Solano County Government Center in Downtown Fairfield, Benicia Capitol State Historic Park, Suisun City Marina, Military C-5 Aircraft takes off from Travis Air Force Base, Vacaville Hills
Official seal of Solano County
Seal
Location in the state of California
Location in the state of California
California's location in the United States
California's location in the United States
Country  United States
State  California
Region/Metro area San Francisco Bay Area
Incorporated February 18, 1850[1]
County seat Fairfield
Largest city Vallejo (population)
Fairfield (area)
Area
 • Total 906 sq mi (2,350 km2)
 • Land 822 sq mi (2,130 km2)
 • Water 84 sq mi (220 km2)
Population (2010)
 • Total 413,344
 • Density 460/sq mi (180/km2)
Time zone Pacific Standard Time (UTC-8)
 • Summer (DST) Pacific Daylight Time (UTC-7)
Area code(s) 707
Website www.solanocounty.com

Solano County is a county located in the U.S. state of California. As of the 2010 census, the population was 413,344.[2] The county seat is Fairfield,[3] and the largest city is Vallejo.

Solano County comprises the Vallejo-Fairfield, CA Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is also included in the San Jose-San Francisco-Oakland, CA Combined Statistical Area.[4] Solano County is the northeastern county in the nine-county San Francisco Bay Area region.

A portion of the South Campus at the University of California, Davis is in Solano County.

History[edit]

Solano County was one of the original counties of California, created in 1850 at the time of statehood.

At the request of General Mariano Guadalupe Vallejo, the county derives its name directly from an Indian Chief, Chief Solano of the Suisun people, a Native American tribe of the region and Vallejo's close ally. Chief Solano at one time led the tribes between the Petaluma River and the Sacramento River. The chief was also called Sem-Yeto, which signifies "brave or fierce hand." The Chief was given the Spanish name Francisco Solano during baptism at the Catholic Mission, and is named after the Spanish Franciscan missionary, Father Francisco Solano. "Solano" is a common surname in the north of Spain, especially in Navarra, Zaragoza and La Rioja.

Travis Air Force Base is located just east of Fairfield.

Region[edit]

Solano County is the easternmost county of the North Bay.[4] As such, it is sometimes reported by news agencies as being in the East Bay.[5][6][7] Additionally, a portion of the county extends into the Sacramento Valley, geographically.

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 906 square miles (2,350 km2), of which 822 square miles (2,130 km2) is land and 84 square miles (220 km2) (9.3%) is water.[8]

Solano County has several inactive cinnabar mines including the Hastings Mine and St. John's Mine,[9] both of which are subject to ongoing environmental monitoring; these mines were worked in the first half of the twentieth century.

Fauna[edit]

Solano County has a number of 2rare and endangered species including the beetle Elaphrus viridis, the wildflower Lasthenia conjugens, commonly known as Contra Costa goldfields and the annual plant Legenere limosa or False Venus' looking glass.

Adjacent counties[edit]

National protected area[edit]

Transportation[edit]

Major highways[edit]

Public transportation[edit]

Solano County is served by several transit agencies:

Each agency interconnects with each other, enabling transit trips throughout the county. Service also connects with BART stations in Contra Costa County. Transit links are provided to Napa, Yolo and Sacramento counties as well.

Greyhound and Amtrak provide long-distance intercity service.

Airports[edit]

General aviation airports in Solano County which are open to the public are the Nut Tree Airport and Rio Vista Municipal Airport.

Crime[edit]

The following table includes the number of incidents reported and the rate per 1,000 persons for each type of offense.

Cities by population and crime rates[edit]

Demographics[edit]

2011[edit]

Places by population, race, and income[edit]

2010[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1850 580
1860 7,169 1,136.0%
1870 16,871 135.3%
1880 18,475 9.5%
1890 20,946 13.4%
1900 24,143 15.3%
1910 27,559 14.1%
1920 40,602 47.3%
1930 40,834 0.6%
1940 49,118 20.3%
1950 104,833 113.4%
1960 134,597 28.4%
1970 169,941 26.3%
1980 235,203 38.4%
1990 340,421 44.7%
2000 394,542 15.9%
2010 413,344 4.8%
Est. 2013 424,788 2.8%
U.S. Decennial Census[19]
1790-1960[20] 1900-1990[21]
1990-2000[22] 2010-2013[2]

The 2010 United States Census reported that Solano County had a population of 413,344. The racial makeup of Solano County was 210,751 (51.0%) White, 60,750 (14.7%) African American, 3,212 (0.8%) Native American, 60,473 (14.6%) Asian, 3,564 (0.9%) Pacific Islander, 43,236 (10.5%) from other races, and 31,358 (7.6%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 99,356 persons (24.0%).[23]

2000[edit]

As of the census[24] of 2000, there were 394,542 people, 130,403 households, and 97,411 families residing in the county. The population density was 476 people per square mile (184/km²). There were 134,513 housing units at an average density of 162 per square mile (63/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 56.4% White, 14.9% Black or African American, 0.8% Native American, 12.8% Asian, 0.8% Pacific Islander, 8.0% from other races, and 6.4% from two or more races. 17.64% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 8.5% were of German, 6.4% Irish and 6.0% English ancestry according to Census 2000. 75.7% spoke English, 12.1% Spanish and 6.6% Tagalog as their first language.

There were 130,403 households out of which 39.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.7% were married couples living together, 13.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.3% were non-families. 19.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.90 and the average family size was 3.33.

In the county the population was spread out with 28.3% under the age of 18, 9.2% from 18 to 24, 31.3% from 25 to 44, 21.7% from 45 to 64, and 9.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 101.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 100.2 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $54,099, and the median income for a family was $60,597. Males had a median income of $41,787 versus $31,916 for females. The per capita income for the county was $21,731. About 6.1% of families and 8.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.3% of those under age 18 and 6.3% of those age 65 or over.

Government and politics[edit]

Government[edit]

The Government of Solano County is defined and authorized under the California Constitution and law as a general law county. The County government provides countywide services such as elections and voter registration, law enforcement, jails, vital records, property records, tax collection, public health, and social services. In addition the County serves as the local government for all unincorporated areas.

The County government is composed of the elected five-member Board of Supervisors, several other elected offices including the Sheriff-Coroner, District Attorney, Assessor/Recorder, Auditor-Controller, and Treasurer/Tax Collector/County Clerk, and numerous county departments and entities under the supervision of the County Administrator. As of January 2013 the members of the Solano County Board of Supervisors were:

  • Erin Hannigan, District 1
  • Linda Seifert, District 2, Chairman
  • Jim Spering, District 3
  • John Vasquez, District 4
  • Skip Thomson, District 5, Vice-Chairman

Politics[edit]

Voter registration statistics[edit]

Cities by population and voter registration[edit]

Overview[edit]

Solano County vote
by party in presidential elections
Year GOP DEM Others
2012 34.1% 52,092 63.3% 96,783 2.6% 3,965
2008 34.9% 56,035 63.5% 102,095 2.1% 3,458
2004 41.9% 62,301 57.2% 85,096 1.0% 1,440
2000 39.2% 51,604 57.0% 75,116 3.8% 5,015
1996 34.7% 40,742 55.1% 64,644 10.1% 11,893
1992 29.4% 38,883 48.7% 64,320 21.9% 28,908
1988 47.4% 50,314 51.2% 54,344 1.4% 1,430
1984 54.5% 51,678 44.3% 41,982 1.2% 1,138
1980 50.7% 40,919 38.4% 30,952 10.9% 8,805
1976 42.4% 26,136 54.6% 33,682 3.0% 1,826
1972 54.0% 31,314 42.7% 24,766 3.3% 1,885
1968 34.7% 17,683 53.5% 27,271 11.8% 5,998
1964 30.4% 15,263 69.5% 34,930 0.1% 47
1960 40.9% 18,751 58.8% 26,977 0.3% 141
1956 41.7% 17,865 58.1% 24,903 0.2% 95
1952 42.4% 19,369 57.2% 26,130 0.5% 216
1948 33.7% 12,345 63.5% 23,257 2.8% 1,022
1944 29.8% 10,361 69.9% 24,335 0.3% 105
1940 28.5% 6,081 70.6% 15,054 0.9% 193
1936 20.9% 3,603 78.1% 13,459 1.1% 182
1932 30.3% 4,382 67.2% 9,712 2.5% 367
1928 52.3% 7,061 46.5% 6,278 1.2% 158
1924 48.0% 4,782 9.6% 957 42.4% 4,223
1920 64.8% 7,102 26.9% 2,954 8.3% 909

Solano is a strongly Democratic county in presidential and congressional elections, though it usually gives somewhat higher vote percentages to Republicans compared to the eight other Bay Area counties. The last Republican to win a majority in the county was Ronald Reagan in 1984.

Solano County is split between California's 3rd and 5th congressional districts, represented by John Garamendi (DWalnut Grove) and Mike Thompson (DSt. Helena), respectively.[26]

In the State Assembly Solano is in the 7th and 8th Assembly districts, which are held by Democrats Michael Allen and Mariko Yamada, respectively. In the California State Senate, Solano is part of the 2nd and 5th Senate districts, which are held by Democrats Noreen Evans and Lois Wolk, respectively.

On Nov. 4, 2008, Solano County voted 55.9% for Proposition 8, which amended the California Constitution to ban same-sex marriages. It was the only Bay Area county to approve the initiative.[citation needed] In the 2008 presidential election that day, Barack Obama carried the county by a 28.5% margin over John McCain, a larger margin than statewide (24%).[27]

According to the California Secretary of State, as of October 22, 2012, Solano County has 209,484 registered voters, out of 274,284 eligible (76.4%). Of those, 101,815 (48.6%) are registered Democrats, 52,777 (25.2%) are registered Republicans, and 45,581 (21.8%) have declined to state a political party.[28] Democrats hold voter-registration advantages in all incorporated cities and towns in Solano County. However, Republicans lead in registration in the unincorporated communities of the county (40%-35%), making Solano the only county in the Bay Area where Republicans out-number Democrats in unincorporated communities. The Democrats' largest registration advantage in Solano is in the city of Vallejo, wherein there are only 8,242 Republicans (14.6%) out of 56,313 total voters compared to 33,753 Democrats (59.9%) and 12,157 voters who have declined to state a political party (21.6%).

Communities[edit]

Cities[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

Trivia[edit]

  • In 1985 Humphrey the humpback whale strayed off his migration route and ended up in Shag Slough north of Rio Vista. Rescuers from The Marine Mammal Center and other volunteers dismantled a county bridge before being able to turn him around in the narrow slough.

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Only larceny-theft cases involving property over $400 in value are reported as property crimes.
  2. ^ Other = Some other race + Two or more races
  3. ^ Native American = Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander + American Indian or Alaska Native
  4. ^ a b Percentage of registered voters with respect to total population. Percentages of party members with respect to registered voters follow.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Chronology". California Counties. California State Association of Counties. Retrieved 2012-05-14. 
  2. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 31, 2014. 
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  4. ^ a b Landis, John D.; Reilly, Michael (2003). "How We Will Grow: Baseline Projections of California's Urban Footprint Through the Year 2011". In Guhathakurta, Subhrajit. Integrated Land Use and Environmental Models: A Survey of Current Applications and Research. Springer. p. 84. ISBN 9783540005766. Retrieved 14 March 2012. 
  5. ^ Alston, John (18 April 2008). "Solano County's unemployment rate soars to 6.4 percent". abc7news.com. Retrieved 14 March 2012. 
  6. ^ Walters, Dan (29 March 1986). "East Bay is a Socioeconomic Dichotomy". Lodi News-Sentinel. p. 12. Retrieved 14 March 2012. 
  7. ^ "Bay Area median home price falls below $500,000". San Francisco Business Times. 17 July 2008. Retrieved 14 March 2012. 
  8. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  9. ^ Hogan, C. Michael; Papineau, Marc (September 1989). "Environmental Assessment of the Columbus Parkway Widening between Ascot Parkway and the Northgate Development, Vallejo". Earth Metrics Inc. Report 7853. California State Clearinghouse. 
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B02001. American FactFinder. Retrieved 2013-10-26.
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Office of the Attorney General, Department of Justice, State of California. Table 11: Crimes – 2009. Retrieved 2013-11-14.
  12. ^ a b c United States Department of Justice, Federal Bureau of Investigation. Crime in the United States, 2012, Table 8 (California). Retrieved 2013-11-14.
  13. ^ a b U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B03003. American FactFinder. Retrieved 2013-10-26.
  14. ^ a b U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B19301. American FactFinder. Retrieved 2013-10-21.
  15. ^ a b U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B19013. American FactFinder. Retrieved 2013-10-21.
  16. ^ a b U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B19113. American FactFinder. Retrieved 2013-10-21.
  17. ^ a b U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates. American FactFinder. Retrieved 2013-10-21.
  18. ^ U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B01003. American FactFinder. Retrieved 2013-10-21.
  19. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 31, 2014. 
  20. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved May 31, 2014. 
  21. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 31, 2014. 
  22. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 31, 2014. 
  23. ^ "2010 Census P.L. 94-171 Summary File Data". United States Census Bureau. 
  24. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2011-05-14. 
  25. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q California Secretary of State. February 10, 2013 - Report of Registration. Retrieved 2013-10-31.
  26. ^ "California's 3rd Congressional District - Representatives & District Map". Civic Impulse, LLC. Retrieved March 1, 2013. 
  27. ^ U.S. Election Atlas
  28. ^ CA Secretary of State – Report of Registration – October 22, 2012

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 38°16′N 121°56′W / 38.27°N 121.94°W / 38.27; -121.94