Solar power in Alaska

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Solar power in Alaska has been primarily used in remote locations,[1] such as the Nenana Teen Center,[2] near Fairbanks, where long summer days provide most of the electricity generated.[3][4] Rooftop solar panels could provide 23% of all electricity used in Alaska.[5] Net metering is available for systems up to 25 kW but is limited to 1.5% of average demand.[6] IREC best practices, based on experience, recommends no limits to net metering, individual or aggregate, and perpetual roll over of kWh credits.[7]

In 2011, Alaska's largest solar array was the 17.28 kW array installed on a building in Anchorage.[8]

A 12 kW solar array installed in Lime Village in July 2001 helped reduce electricity costs.[9][10]

Statistics[edit]

Source: NREL[11]
Alaska Grid-Connected PV Capacity (MWp)[12][13][14][15]
Year Capacity Change % Change
2010 <0.1
2011 <0.1
2012 <0.1


See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Renewable Energy in Alaska
  2. ^ Nenana Teen Center
  3. ^ Do Solar Panels Work in Alaska?
  4. ^ Tiny Alaskan Village May Set Solar Pace for Remote Areas
  5. ^ Report Argues for a Decentralized System of Renewable Power Generation
  6. ^ Alaska - Net Metering
  7. ^ Net Metering and Interconnection Procedures Incorporating Best Practices
  8. ^ Solar Panels Light Up Downtown Building
  9. ^ View from the Field – Solar in Alaska
  10. ^ Hybrid generator cuts Lime Village energy costs
  11. ^ "PV Watts". NREL. Retrieved 9 June 2012. 
  12. ^ Sherwood, Larry (August 2012). "U.S. Solar Market Trends 2011". Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC). Retrieved 2012-08-16. 
  13. ^ Sherwood, Larry (June 2011). "U.S. Solar Market Trends 2010". Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC). Retrieved 2011-06-29. 
  14. ^ Sherwood, Larry (July 2009). "U.S. Solar Market Trends 2008" (PDF). Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC). p. 16. Retrieved 2010-07-24. 
  15. ^ Sherwood, Larry (July 2012). "U.S. Solar Market Trends 2012" (PDF). Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC). p. 16. Retrieved 2013-10-11. 

External links[edit]