Solar power in Nevada

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Solar power in Nevada has been growing, due to a Renewable Portfolio Standard which requires 20% renewable energy by 2015, and 5% from solar power.[1] Nevada, at the end of 2007, became home to then-largest photovoltaic power plant in the world, the 14.2 megawatt (peak) Nellis Solar Power Plant, which, by selling the renewable energy credits (RECs), was able to provide Nellis Air Force Base with electricity for only 2.2 cents/kWh, instead of the 9 cents they are paying Nevada Power.[2] Since then many larger photovoltaic plants have been built, and proposed.

Nevada has vast deserts, and is capable of providing a great amount of solar power. The Nellis power plant only occupies 140 acres (57 ha) of land.

Nevada is also home to the 64 MW concentrating solar thermal power plant, Nevada Solar One.

The 350 MW Silver State South Project is a photovoltaic power station which has been proposed by First Solar,[3] the top solar contractor in the US.[4]

The 350 MW Moapa Solar Project is a photovoltaic power station which has been proposed by K Road Power.[3]

Prominent Nevada-based solar installation companies include Summerlin Energy, Bombard Renewable Energy, and Hamilton Solar.[5]

Statistics[edit]

Nevada Grid-Connected PV Capacity (MW)[6][7][8][9][10][11][12]
Year Capacity Installed % Change
2007 18.8 15.9 548%
2008 34.2 14.9 82%
2009 36.4 2.5 6%
2010 104.7 68.3 188%
2011 124.1 19.4 19%
2012 349.7 225.6 182%
2013 424.0 74.3 21%

Nevada solar electric generation:[13][14]

Year Generation
(GWh)
Generation
(% of total)
2010 217 0.62%
2011 290 0.90%
2012 473 1.34%
2013 749 2.05%

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Energy Portfolio Standard
  2. ^ Solar panels at Nellis could be win-win
  3. ^ a b Bureau of Land Management (November 22, 2011). "2012 Renewable Energy Priority Projects". 
  4. ^ Solar Power World
  5. ^ Solar Power World
  6. ^ Sherwood, Larry (July 2014). "U.S. Solar Market Trends 2013". Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC). Retrieved 2014-07-17. 
  7. ^ Sherwood, Larry (July 2013). "U.S. Solar Market Trends 2012" (PDF). Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC). p. 16. Retrieved 2013-10-11. 
  8. ^ Sherwood, Larry (August 2012). "U.S. Solar Market Trends 2011". Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC). Retrieved 2012-08-16. 
  9. ^ Sherwood, Larry (June 2011). "U.S. Solar Market Trends 2010". Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC). Retrieved 2011-06-29. 
  10. ^ Sherwood, Larry (July 2010). "U.S. Solar Market Trends 2009". Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC). Retrieved 2010-07-28. 
  11. ^ Sherwood, Larry (July 2009). "U.S. Solar Market Trends 2008" (PDF). Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC). p. 16. Retrieved 2010-07-24. 
  12. ^ Sherwood, Larry (August 2008). "U.S. Solar Market Trends 2007". Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC). Retrieved 2010-07-24. 
  13. ^ "Electric Power Monthly with Data for December 2011". U.S. Energy Information Administration. February 2012. Retrieved 2014-07-17. 
  14. ^ "Electric Power Monthly with Data for December 2013". U.S. Energy Information Administration. February 2014. Retrieved 2014-07-17.