Solicitor-General of Australia

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The Solicitor-General of the Commonwealth of Australia is the country's second law officer, after the Attorney-General for Australia. The holders of this office are not members of Parliament.

The Commonwealth Solicitor-General gives the Government legal advice and appears in court to represent the Commonwealth's interest in important legal proceedings, particularly in the High Court.[1]

The office was created in 1916 with the appointment of Sir Robert Garran. Prior to this, from 1903 to 1913 Sir Charles Powers had served as the first Commonwealth Crown Solicitor,[2][3][4] which later became the Australian Government Solicitor. Sir Charles Powers was also sometimes referred to as the "Solicitor-General",[5][6] but the two offices are separate: Powers was succeeded in 1913 as Crown Solicitor by Gordon Castle,[7] whereas the first Solicitor-General, Robert Garran, was not appointed until 1916.[8]

Name Period in office
Robert Garran 1916 – 1932
George Knowles 1932 – 1946
Kenneth Bailey[9] 1946 – 1964
Anthony Mason 1964 – 1969
Bob Ellicott 1969 – 1973
Maurice Byers 1973 – 1983
Gavan Griffith 1984 – 1997
Henry Burmester (acting) 1997 – 1998
David Bennett 1998 – 2008
Stephen Gageler 2008 – 2012
Justin Gleeson 2013 –

References[edit]

  1. ^ Solicitor-General. Australian Government Directory. Retrieved 21 August 2012.
  2. ^ Forster, Colin. "Powers, Sir Charles (1853–1939)". Australian Dictionary of Biography. Canberra: Australian National University. Retrieved 9 July 2013. 
  3. ^ Sir Charles Powers KCMG, High Court of Australia
  4. ^ Sir Charles Powers, Supreme Court Library Queensland
  5. ^ "Obituary. Sir Charles Powers". The Argus. Trove. 26 April 1939. 
  6. ^ "From the States". Cairns Morning Post. Trove. 12 June 1903. 
  7. ^ AGS Legal Opinions - CASTLE Gordon Harwood, Attorney-General's Department
  8. ^ Forster, Colin. "Garran, Sir robert Randolph (1867–1957)". Australian Dictionary of Biography. Canberra: Australian National University. Retrieved 6 May 2014. 
  9. ^ http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/bailey-sir-kenneth-hamilton-9404