Solidago villosicarpa

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Solidago villosicarpa
Solidago villosicarpa.jpg
Conservation status

Critically Imperiled (NatureServe)
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
Order: Asterales
Family: Asteraceae
Tribe: Astereae
Genus: Solidago
Species: S. villosicarpa
Binomial name
Solidago villosicarpa
LeBlond

Solidago villosicarpa is a species of flowering plant in the aster family known by the common names coastal goldenrod, glandular wand goldenrod, and shaggy-fruit goldenrod.[1] It is endemic to North Carolina in the United States, where there are only four known populations.[2]

Solidago villosicarpa is a subsection of the Solidago Squarrosae (Bicolor) group that is found east of the Rocky Mountains in Canada and the United States.[3]

This goldenrod was first collected in 1949, misidentified for several decades, and described as a new species in 2000.[4][2] It is a perennial herb which can grow to 1.5 meters tall. There is usually a single erect stem which may be brownish to bluish in color and has rough hairs. The basal rosette of leaves may be up to 30 centimeters wide[2] and may persist until the flowering stage. The leaves are serrated and lined with hairs. The inflorescence contains many flower heads that contain several yellow ray and disc florets. The fruits are covered in long hairs.[5]

This species is native to the coastal plain of North Carolina.[6] It occurs in a variety of habitat types, but it is always found within 1000 feet of an estuary.[2] It grows in several types of forest habitat and maritime scrub. It grows on the coast or farther inland next to tidal waters. The plant is likely adapted to patterns of disturbance, except for fire. The sites where it is currently found have all been logged at some point. The plants also respond positively to hurricane damage, where surrounding trees are blown down. The species is probably not tolerant of shade and does better when the canopy is opened or removed.[2]

Each of the four known populations has between 100 and 1400 individuals. It is considered critically imperiled.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Shaggy fruit" is the literal translation of the specific villosicarpa.
  2. ^ a b c d e f Solidago villosicarpa. NatureServe.
  3. ^ Aster Graphics, John C. Semple. Classification and Illustrations of Goldenrods
  4. ^ LeBlond, R.J. (2000). "Solidago villosicarpa (Asteraceae: Astereae), a rare new Southeastern Coastal Plain endemic". Sida 19 (2): 291–300. 
  5. ^ Solidago villosicarpa. Flora of North America.
  6. ^ Solidago villosicarpa. Center for Plant Conservation.

External links[edit]