Somers Point, New Jersey

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Somers Point, New Jersey
City
City of Somers Point
Map of Somers Point in Atlantic County. Inset: Location of Atlantic County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Somers Point in Atlantic County. Inset: Location of Atlantic County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Somers Point, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Somers Point, New Jersey
Coordinates: 39°18′58″N 74°36′24″W / 39.31608°N 74.60677°W / 39.31608; -74.60677Coordinates: 39°18′58″N 74°36′24″W / 39.31608°N 74.60677°W / 39.31608; -74.60677[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Atlantic
Incorporated April 24, 1886
Government[6]
 • Type City
 • Mayor John L. Glasser, Jr. (term ends December 31, 2015)[3]
 • Administrator Wes Swain[4]
 • Clerk Carol Degrassi[5]
Area[1]
 • Total 5.159 sq mi (13.361 km2)
 • Land 4.030 sq mi (10.437 km2)
 • Water 1.129 sq mi (2.924 km2)  21.88%
Elevation[7] 16 ft (5 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total 10,795
 • Estimate (2013)[11] 10,785
 • Rank 226th of 566 in state
7th of 23 in county[12]
 • Density 2,678.8/sq mi (1,034.3/km2)
 • Density rank 234th of 566 in state
5th of 23 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08244[13][14]
Area code 609 exchanges: 601, 653, 926, 927[15]
FIPS code 34001684307[1][16][17]
GNIS feature ID 0885397[1][18]
Website www.somerspointgov.org

Somers Point is a city in Atlantic County, New Jersey, United States. At the 2010 United States Census, the city's population was 10,795,[8][9][10] reflecting a decline of 819 (-7.1%) from the 11,614 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 398 (+3.5%) from the 11,216 counted in the 1990 Census.[19]

The City of Somers Point is in the eastern part of Atlantic County, southwest of Atlantic City.

History[edit]

Somers Point was once known as the Somerset Plantation and its settlement started around 1693. The Somers Mansion, with a commanding view of Somers Point's harbor, was built in 1725. Somers Point was designated as a port of entry in 1791 and remained one until it was abolished in 1915.[20][21]

Somers Point was originally incorporated as a borough by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on April 24, 1886, from portions of Egg Harbor Township, based on the results of a referendum held five days earlier. The borough was reincorporated on April 2, 1890, based on the previous day's referendum. Somers Point was incorporated as a city on April 9, 1902, from all of Somers Point borough and additional portions of Egg Harbor Township.[22]

Geography[edit]

Somers Point is located at 39°18′58″N 74°36′24″W / 39.31608°N 74.60677°W / 39.31608; -74.60677 (39.31608,-74.60677). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city had a total area of 5.159 square miles (13.361 km2), of which, 4.030 square miles (10.437 km2) of it was land and 1.129 square miles (2.924 km2) of it (21.88%) was water.[1][2]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1890 191
1900 308 61.3%
1910 604 96.1%
1920 843 39.6%
1930 2,073 145.9%
1940 1,992 −3.9%
1950 2,480 24.5%
1960 4,504 81.6%
1970 7,919 75.8%
1980 10,330 30.4%
1990 11,216 8.6%
2000 11,614 3.5%
2010 10,795 −7.1%
Est. 2013 10,785 [11] −0.1%
Population sources: 1890-2000[23]
1890-1920[24] 1890-1920[25]
1890-1910[26] 1910-1930[27]
1930-1990[28] 2000[29][30] 2010[8][9][10]

2010 Census[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 10,795 people, 4,655 households, and 2,826 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,678.8 per square mile (1,034.3 /km2). There were 5,556 housing units at an average density of 1,378.7 per square mile (532.3 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 78.75% (8,501) White, 10.68% (1,153) Black or African American, 0.25% (27) Native American, 3.08% (332) Asian, 0.06% (6) Pacific Islander, 4.17% (450) from other races, and 3.02% (326) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 9.49% (1,024) of the population.[8]

There were 4,655 households, of which 26.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 36.8% were married couples living together, 18.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 39.3% were non-families. 31.9% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.32 and the average family size was 2.90.[8]

In the city, 21.3% of the population were under the age of 18, 9.0% from 18 to 24, 24.0% from 25 to 44, 31.1% from 45 to 64, and 14.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41.4 years. For every 100 females there were 88.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 84.5 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006–2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $47,312 (with a margin of error of +/- $4,646) and the median family income was $51,489 (+/- $7,704). Males had a median income of $45,385 (+/- $6,862) versus $37,536 (+/- $3,731) for females. The per capita income for the city was $29,626 (+/- $1,822). About 11.9% of families and 12.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 25.6% of those under age 18 and 6.6% of those age 65 or over.[31]

2000 Census[edit]

At the 2000 United States Census,[16] there were 11,614 people, 4,920 households and 2,952 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,883.1 per square mile (1,112.7/km2). There were 5,402 housing units at an average density of 1,341.0 per square mile (517.5/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 85.66% White, 7.01% African American, 0.25% Native American, 3.17% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 2.25% from other races, and 1.64% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.99% of the population.[29][30]

There were 4,920 households of which 29.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 41.2% were married couples living together, 14.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 40.0% were non-families. 32.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.32 and the average family size was 2.97.[29][30]

Age distribution was 23.4% under the age of 18, 7.1% from 18 to 24, 31.6% from 25 to 44, 22.9% from 45 to 64, and 15.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 88.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 84.2 males.[29][30]

The median household income was $42,222, and the median family income was $51,868. Males had a median income of $39,650 versus $28,691 for females. The per capita income for the city was $22,229. About 5.0% of families and 7.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.3% of those under age 18 and 2.3% of those age 65 or over.[29][30]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Somers Point is governed under the City form of government, with a mayor and a seven-member City Council, with three members each from two wards and a single at-large seat, all elected on a partisan basis as part of the November general election.[6] The Mayor is elected to a four-year term and is assigned overall responsibility for the health, safety and welfare of the municipality. As Chief Executive Officer, the Mayor is charged with putting into effect the municipal laws, known as ordinances. The Mayor is not a member of the governing body, but has the statutory authority to veto ordinances, and may vote in the event of a tie. The Mayor makes appointments to certain boards, including the Planning Board, Recreation Commission, and Environmental Commission. The City Council, the city's governing body, consists of seven members, with three members from each of two wards, elected for staggered three-year terms, and one at large representative, elected to a four-year term. The Council elects one of its members as President to chair the Council meetings and perform the other duties of a presiding officer. The City Council is the governing body of the City. They enact ordinances. The Council adopts an annual budget and sets policy for the municipality.[32]

As of 2014, the Mayor of Somers Point is Republican John L. Glasser, Jr. whose term of office ends on December 31, 2015.[33] Members of the City Council are Council President Maureen Kern (R, 2014; 2nd Ward), Carl D'Adamo (D, 2016; At Large), Howard Dill (R, 2015; 2nd Ward), Sean McGuigan (R, 2016; 1st Ward), Thomas Smith (R, 2015; 1st Ward), Dennis Tapp (R, 2016; 2nd Ward) and Ralph Triboletti (R, 2014; 1st Ward).[34][35][36][37][38][39]

In elections held on November 8, 2011, Glasser defeated Democrat-turned Independent Daniel Gudauskas by 1,650-558, making it the largest margin of victory in a contested election on the municipal level in Somers Point history. Triboletti and Kern ran unopposed in the first and second wards respectively.[40]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Somers Point is located in the 2nd Congressional District[41] and is part of New Jersey's 2nd state legislative district.[9][42][43] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Somers Point had been in the 1st state legislative district.[44]

New Jersey's Second Congressional District is represented by Frank LoBiondo (R, Ventnor City).[45] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[46][47] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[48][49]

The 2nd Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Jim Whelan (D, Atlantic City) and in the General Assembly by Chris A. Brown (R, Ventnor City) and John F. Amodeo (D, Northfield).[50] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[51] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[52]

Atlantic County is governed by a County Executive directly chosen by voters, with the county's legislature, the Board of Chosen Freeholders, consisting of nine members elected to three-year terms on a staggered basis, with three seats coming up for election each year; four of its members are elected at-large and there are five election districts, each of which elect a single member.[53][54] The County Executive is Dennis Levinson (Linwood, term ends December 31, 2015.[55] As of 2013, Atlantic County's Freeholders are the four at-large members; Colin G. Bell (Northfield, 2015)[56], Alexander C. Marino (Linwood, 2014)[57], Vice Chairman Joseph J. McDevitt (Ventnor City, 2013)[58] and John W. Risley (Northfield, 2014)[59]; and five district members elected from District 1 (Atlantic City (part), Egg Harbor Township (part) and Pleasantville) Charles T. Garrett (Atlantic City, 2013)[60], District 2 - (Atlantic City (part), Egg Harbor Township (part), Longport, Margate City, Somers Point and Ventnor City), Chairman Frank D. Formica (Atlantic City, 2015)[61], District 3 (Egg Harbor Township (part), Hamilton Township (part), Linwood and Northfield) - Frank Sutton (Egg Harbor Township, 2014)[62], District 4 (Absecon, Brigantine, Galloway Township and Port Republic - Richard Dase (Galloway Township, 2013)[63] and District 5 (Buena Borough, Buena Vista Township, Corbin City, Egg Harbor City, Estell Manor, Folsom, Hamilton Township (part), Hammonton, Mullica Township and Weymouth Township) - James A. Bertino (Hammonton, 2015).[64][53]

Education[edit]

Students in pre-Kindergarten through eighth grade are served by the Somers Point Public Schools. As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's three schools had an enrollment of 1,098 students and 99.1 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 11.08:1.[65] Schools in the district (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[66]) are New York Avenue School[67] with 93 students in pre-school, Dawes Avenue School[68] with 384 students in grades K-6 and Jordan Road Middle School[69] with 621 students in Pre-K through 8th grade.[70]

Students in public school for ninth through twelfth grades attend the Mainland Regional High School, which also serves students from Linwood and Northfield.[71] The high school is located in Linwood.

Students from Somers Point, and all of Atlantic County, have the option to attend the career technical programs and full-time career academies offered by the Atlantic County Institute of Technology located in the Mays Landing section of Hamilton Township[72] or the Charter-Tech High School for the Performing Arts, located in Somers Point.[73]

St. Joseph Regional School is a Catholic elementary school serving students in Kindergarten through eighth grade, operated under the jurisdiction of the Diocese of Camden.[74][75]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

The city had a total of 55.39 miles (89.14 km) of roadways, of which 43.19 miles (69.51 km) are maintained by the municipality, 5.45 miles (8.77 km) by Atlantic County and 3.73 miles (6.00 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and 3.02 miles (4.86 km) by the New Jersey Turnpike Authority.[76]

The Garden State Parkway passes through the city, connecting Egg Harbor Township on either side of the city.[77] Interchange 30 for the Parkway is located in the city, signed for Somers Point and Downtown Ocean City.[78]

On the city's southern border, bridges connect to Cape May County via the Garden State Parkway to Upper Township, into Ocean City via Route 52 and over the Beesley's Point Bridge, which has been demolished.[79] As part of a $400 million project completed by the New Jersey Department of Transportation in 2012, a new causeway for Route 52 was completed over Great Egg Harbor Bay, replacing the Howard S. Stainton Memorial Causeway that had been completed in 1933.[80] the Beesley's Point Bridge was demolished in 2013 as part of a project adding a new bridge for traffic on the Parkway.[81]

Public transportation[edit]

New Jersey Transit offers bus transportation in the city between Ocean City and Atlantic City on the 507 and 509 routes.[82][83]

Popular culture[edit]

The 1983 movie Eddie and the Cruisers was largely filmed in Somers Point, using the defunct Tony Mart's nightclub as a setting.[84]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Somers Point include:

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  2. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 13, 2013.
  4. ^ Department of Administration, City of Somers Point. Accessed August 4, 2012.
  5. ^ Office of the City Clerk, City of Somers Point. Accessed August 4, 2012.
  6. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 8.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: City of Somers Point, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 14, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Somers Point city, Atlantic County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 1, 2012.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 2. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c Table DP-1. Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Somers Point city, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed January 1, 2012.
  11. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 - 2013 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2014.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 21, 2013.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code, United States Postal Service. Accessed November 27, 2011.
  14. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed November 19, 2013.
  15. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Somers Point, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed November 19, 2013.
  16. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  17. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed August 4, 2012.
  18. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  19. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed August 4, 2012.
  20. ^ "An Historic Trip Up the Great Egg Harbor River", Somers Point Historical Society. Accessed November 20, 2013.
  21. ^ Treasury decisions under customs and other laws, p. 804. United States Department of the Treasury, 1916. Accessed November 20, 2013.
  22. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 70. Accessed August 4, 2012.
  23. ^ Barnett, Bob. Population Data for Atlantic County Municipalities, 1840 - 2000, WestJersey.org. December 6, 2010. Accessed November 20, 2013.
  24. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed November 19, 2013.
  25. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed August 12, 2013.
  26. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 335. Accessed August 4, 2012.
  27. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 714. Accessed January 1, 2012.
  28. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930–1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed January 1, 2012.
  29. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Somers Point city, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 4, 2012.
  30. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Somers Point city, Atlantic County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 4, 2012.
  31. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006–2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Somers Point city, Atlantic County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 1, 2012.
  32. ^ Government, City of Somers Point. Accessed January 17, 2012.
  33. ^ Mayor Jack Glasser, City of Somers Point. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  34. ^ City Council, City of Somers Point. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  35. ^ [Council President Maureen Kern (R, 2014; 2nd Ward), Carl D'Adamo (D, 2015; At Large), Howard Dill (R, 2015; 2nd Ward), Sean McGuigan (R, 2013; 1st Ward), Thomas Smith (R, 2015; 1st Ward), Dennis Tapp (R, 2013; 2nd Ward) and Ralph Triboletti (R, 2014; 1st Ward) 2014 Municipal Data Sheet], City of Somers Point. Accessed November 19, 2013.
  36. ^ Municipal Governments in Atlantic County, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  37. ^ Atlantic County General Election November 6, 2012, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed November 19, 2013.
  38. ^ Atlantic County General Election November 8, 2011, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed November 19, 2013.
  39. ^ Atlantic County General Election November 2, 2010, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed November 19, 2013.
  40. ^ Smith, Shaun. "Glasser, Kern, Triboletti win re-election in Somers Point ", Shore News Today, November 9, 2011. Accessed November 27, 2011. "Republican John L. "Jack" Glasser has been elected here to his second term as mayor, and he will be joined by fellow incumbent council members Maureen Kern and Ralph Triboletti."
  41. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  42. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 64, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  43. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  44. ^ 2011 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 64, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  45. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  46. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  47. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  48. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  49. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  50. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 15, 2014.
  51. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  52. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  53. ^ a b Board of Chosen Freeholders, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  54. ^ Atlantic County District Map 2013, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  55. ^ County Executive Dennis Levinson, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  56. ^ Colin G. Bell, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  57. ^ Alexander C. Marino, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  58. ^ Joseph C. McDevitt, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  59. ^ John W. Risley, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  60. ^ Charles T. Garrett, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  61. ^ Frank D. Formica, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  62. ^ Frank Sutton, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  63. ^ Richard Dase, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  64. ^ James A. Bertino, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  65. ^ District information for Somers Point School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  66. ^ School Data for the Somers Point Public Schools, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  67. ^ New York Avenue School, Somers Point Public Schools. Accessed August 12, 2013.
  68. ^ Dawes Avenue School, Somers Point Public Schools. Accessed August 12, 2013.
  69. ^ Jordan Road Middle School, Somers Point Public Schools. Accessed August 12, 2013.
  70. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Somers Point Public Schools, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed August 12, 2013.
  71. ^ Mainland Regional High School 2013 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed July 28, 2014. "The 2012-2013 school year was another very successful year for Mainland Regional High School. Enrollment slightly decreased to approximately 1500 students in our 9-12 building. The school serves the communities of Linwood, Northfield, and Somers Point with a total population of 26,511. "
  72. ^ About Us, Atlantic County Institute of Technology. Accessed November 19, 2013.
  73. ^ Profile, Charter-Tech High School for the Performing Arts. Accessed November 19, 2013.
  74. ^ Atlantic County Schools, Roman Catholic Diocese of Camden. Accessed July 21, 2013.
  75. ^ Home Page, Saint Joseph Regional School. Accessed July 21, 2013. "St. Joseph Regional School is located in Somers Point, New Jersey and is staffed by the Sisters of Saint Joseph and lay teachers."
  76. ^ Atlantic County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed November 19, 2013.
  77. ^ Garden State Parkway Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation, January 1997. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  78. ^ Travel Resources: Interchanges, Service Areas & Commuter Lots, New Jersey Turnpike Authority. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  79. ^ About our Community, City of Somers Point. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  80. ^ Smith, Shaun. "Bridge opening reconnects Somers Point, Ocean City ", The Current, May 30, 2012. Accessed July 28, 2014. "The bridge it replaced was named the Howard S. Stainton Memorial Causeway, built in 1933."
  81. ^ Campbell, Braden. " As one bridge goes up, one comes down at Beesley's PointContractor balances two jobs at once", The Press of Atlantic City, November 6, 2013. Accessed July 28, 2014. "This is the task facing Route 52 Contractors - the same outfit responsible for the new roadway between Somers Point and Ocean City - which earlier this year was awarded a $130 million contract by the New Jersey Turnpike Authority to take down the decaying Beesleys Point Bridge and build a new southbound Garden State Parkway span bridging Somers Point and Upper Township."
  82. ^ Atlantic County Bus / Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of February 23, 2011. Accessed November 19, 2013.
  83. ^ South Jersey Transit Guide, Cross County Connection, as of April 1, 2010. Accessed November 19, 2013.
  84. ^ Staff. "Nostalgia rules / Classic sounds and theater headline a busy Friday", The Press of Atlantic City, November 21, 2008. Accessed April 8, 2011. "In 1983, American rock fans fell in love with "Eddie and the Cruisers", a cult film about a fictional rock band that was shot partly in former Somers Point nightspot Tony Mart's."
  85. ^ Joe Bastardi Private Client Services: Biography, AccuWeather. Accessed January 1, 2012. "Joe was born in Providence, R.I., and grew up in College Station, Texas, and Somers Point, N.J."
  86. ^ Doug Colman, database Football. Accessed November 6, 2007.
  87. ^ Stewart, Zan. "Drummer Discovers Small Is Beautiful", Los Angeles Times, April 25, 1993. Accessed November 19, 2013. "Last year, [Peter Erskine], along with bassist John Patitucci, traveled through the United States for a month with a threesome led by pianist Chick Corea. The Somers Point, N. J., native also worked in Italy and Spain as part of pianist Joey Calderazzo's trio, then recorded on the latter's upcoming Blue Note release."
  88. ^ Staff. "Kagen, David", Theatre World Volume 35, p. 244, Crown Publishers, 1980. Accessed November 27, 2011.
  89. ^ Cavin, Curt. "Young rivals surge to top after loss of ex-champs", The Indianapolis Star, February 20, 2010. Accessed March 31, 2011. "Lawrence, 22, is originally from Somers Point, N.J., but he trains in Carlsbad, Calif."
  90. ^ Lemongello, Steven. "Playmate's journey began in Somers Point", The Press of Atlantic City, April 19, 2009. Accessed March 31, 2011. ""From Gregory's to Caroline's to the Anchorage", Jennifer Pershing, 28, listed her hometown drinking establishments, 'pretty much any time I walk into one, I see somebody I know.' The former Jennifer Ackley, a 1998 graduate of Mainland Regional High School, returned to the area this weekend for an appearance at the Trump Taj Mahal Casino Resort - or, as this week's At The Shore puts it, locals and visitors had the chance to 'Party with a Playmate.'"
  91. ^ Hilt, Ed. "Brief time with Pats enough to make Stone a believer", The Press of Atlantic City, February 3, 2008. Accessed November 19, 2013. "'That was after they came off that (playoff) loss to Denver,' said Stone, from Somers Point, who was in the Patriots' camp in 2006 as a wide receiver after three years with the Oakland Raiders."
  92. ^ Captain John Jeffries Burial Marker - Nomination Form, National Register of Historic Places. Accessed August 12, 2013.

External links[edit]