Songara

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Sonigara or Songira is the name of a branch of the Chauhan clan of Agnivanshi Rajputs. They had their seat of power at Jalore in the state of Rajasthan, India. Sonigara Rajputs belong to the Agnivanshi Rajputs which claim to descend from Agni, the Vedic god of fire. Jalore, Pokhran, Bundi, Kotah and Sirohi were ruled by Sonigara Chouhan Rajputs. Kanhad Dev Sonigara is perhaps the most famous of the Sonigara rulers of Jalore. Ambliara Princely State is a Songara dynasty Rajput state in Gujarat establishing state in reign of Mughal Emperoe Aurangzeb in 1619 through Maharaj Krishnadasji Sonigara descended of Rani Popadevi of jalore now Ambliara in Sabarkantha Agency in Gujarat.

History[edit]

A prominent Rajput race and bastion in Rajasthan reduced by Alauddin was Chauhan Khanhad dev Sonigara’s Kingdom of Jalore. The first penetration of the Khalji forces into Jalore was conducted as early as the third year of Sultans ‘reign. The objective however, was the invasion of Gujarat. On their return march from Gujarat, there was a serious uprising in the Muslim army near Jalore over the issue of distribution of one – fifth of the spoils. Many rebellious Muslims, when hard pressed, fled to join the adjoining Raos and Rajas.

Attacks[edit]

Kanhadadev Sonigara’s independent existence and hostile attitude attracted the attention of the Sultan in 1305 when Delhi troops marched towards Jalore and besieged the fortress. The "Kanhadadevaprabandha" and other Rajput accounts mentions in detail the defense preparations carried on by the Sonigaras. The garrison was subjected to starvation and utmost misery. Flames of Jauhar rose high in which Sonigara queens consigned themselves. Kanhadadev Sonigara came out of the fortress and died fighting against the Imperial forces in 1311-12 A.D.

Clans[edit]

  1. Maansinghot Sonigara[1]
  2. Bhansinghot Sonigara
  3. Roopsinghot Sonigara
  4. Akheirajsinghot sonigara
  5. Tejmalot Sonigara

References[edit]

  1. ^ Archibald Adams, The western Rajputana states: a medico-topographical and general account, page 60