Sophie Gail

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Sophie Gail after Eugène Isabey

Edmee Sophie Gail née Garre (b. 28 August 1775, d. 24 July 1819) was a French singer and composer.

Life[edit]

Sophie Garre was born in Paris in the parish of Saint Sulpice, the daughter of Marie-Louise Adelaide Colloz and surgeon Claude-Francois Garre (1730–1799). She studied piano as a child and published her first composition, a romance, at the age of 14. At the age of 19, she married editor Jean-Baptiste Gail (1755–1829) and had one son, Jean François Gail.

She and her husband divorced in 1801, and Sophie Garre toured as a singer in Europe. She studied with Fétis, Perne and Sigismund Neukomm and wrote an opera comique as her first work for theater. She died in Paris.[1][2]

Works[edit]

Selected works include:

  • 1797, Deus airs for the drama Montoni
  • 1813, Les deux jaloux, opéra comique in one act
  • 1814, Il est vrai que Thibaut mérite, romance
  • 1853, Ma Fanchette est charmante, trio
  • 1813, Mademoiselle de Launay à la Bastille, opéra-comique in one act
  • 1813 Ma liberté, ma liberté, romance
  • 1814, Angela ou L'atelier de Jean Cousin, opéra comique in 1 act
  • 1814, La Méprise, opéra comique in 1 act
  • 1818, La Sérénade, opéra
  • 1807, N'est-ce pas elle, romance with piano accompaniment
  • 1807, La jeune et charmante Isabelle, romance
  • 1808, Heure de soir, romance with piano and harp accompaniment
  • 1814, Les devoirs du chevalier, romance on a poème de Creuzé de Lesser
  • 1814, Variations concertantes for flute and piano
  • 1861, Transcription variée de Moeris for piano
  • 1815, Prière aux songes, nocturne à deux voix sur un poème de M. Cheurlin, with piano and harp accompaniment
  • 1815, Le souvenir du diable
  • 1838, Le Diable, chansonnette sur un poème d'Arnault with piano
  • 1838, A mes fleurs, with piano
  • 1820, Les langueurs et le Le Serment, nocturnes with piano

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sadie, Julie Anne; Samuel, Rhian (1994). The Norton/Grove dictionary of women composers (Digitized online by GoogleBooks). Retrieved 12 December 2010. 
  2. ^ "Gail (Edmee) Sophie". Retrieved 12 December 2010.