Sorbus eminens

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Sorbus eminens
Conservation status
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Rosids
Order: Rosales
Family: Rosaceae
Genus: Sorbus
Subgenus: Sorbus subg. Aria
Species: S. eminens
Binomial name
Sorbus eminens
E.F.Warb.

Sorbus eminens, the round-leaved whitebeam, sometimes classified as Aria eminens when the Aria subgenus of Sorbus is elevated to full genus,[1] is a species of plant in the Rosaceae family. It is endemic to the United Kingdom. It is threatened by habitat loss.

Description[edit]

As part of the Sorbus aria complex, Sorbus eminens is broadly similar to S. aria. It is a shrub or small tree up to 10 m (33 ft) tall. The undersides of the leaves are greyish-white due to the many hairs. The leaves are more or less round, usually with a length 1–1.3 times the width, rarely up to 1.5 times as long as wide; they usually have 9–11 veins on either side. The leaf margins usually have a single series of teeth ("uniserrate") although there can be evidence of a second series ("biserrate"). The fruits have many lenticels, small and large, mainly towards the base.[2]

Distribution and habitat[edit]

Sorbus eminens is endemic to parts of south-west England and south Wales. It is considered to be native to calciferous woodland in north Somerset, west Gloucestershire, Herefordshire and Monmouthshire.[2] It has also been recorded in Sutton Park, Birmingham, well outside its expected range, where it is assumed to have been planted originally.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "NBN Taxonomic and Designation Information: Sorbus eminens". National Biodiversity Network. Joint Nature Conservation Committee. Retrieved 29 June 2012. 
  2. ^ a b Stace, Clive (2010). New Flora of the British Isles (3rd ed.). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-0-521-70772-5.  p. 209.
  3. ^ Trueman, Ian; Poulton, Mike; Reade, Paul (2013). Flora of Birmingham and the Black Country. Newbury, Berks: Pisces Publications. ISBN 978-1-874357-55-1.  p. 271.

Source[edit]