Sorcerer (Miles Davis album)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Sorcerer
Studio album by Miles Davis
Released December 1967
Recorded May 16–24, 1967
30th Street Studio B, New York
August 21, 1962 (track 7)
30th Street Studio A, New York
Genre Post-bop[1]
Length 40:17
Label Columbia
Producer Teo Macero
Miles Davis chronology
Miles Smiles
(1967)
Sorcerer
(1967)
Nefertiti
(1968)
Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
Allmusic 4.5/5 stars[2]
Down Beat 5/5 stars[3]
Sputnikmusic 4/5[4]

Sorcerer is an album recorded in May 1967 by the Miles Davis quintet. It is the third of five albums that this quintet recorded. It also includes one track from a 1962 session with vocalist Bob Dorough, which was the first time Wayne Shorter recorded with Davis. Davis does not play on the second track, "Pee Wee".[5] The album's cover is a photo of actress Cicely Tyson, who at the time was Davis's girlfriend (and many years later his wife), in profile.

Songs[edit]

The only tune from the album known to have appeared in Davis's live performances is "Masqualero", written by Wayne Shorter. Davis's groups performed it as late as April 1970; the last known version appears on the live album Black Beauty. The tune has also been revived by Wayne Shorter by his quartet since the 90's.

The CD reissue includes alternate takes of "Masqualero" and "Limbo". The alternate take of "Limbo" was actually recorded in Los Angeles on May 9, several days before the final take was recorded in New York City. This take also replaces Ron Carter with bassist Buster Williams. Both versions of "Masqualero" were recorded on the same date and with the same personnel.

Track listing[edit]

  1. "Prince of Darkness" (Shorter) - 6:30
  2. "Pee Wee" (Tony Williams) - 4:51
  3. "Masqualero" (Shorter) - 8:55
  4. "The Sorcerer" (Hancock) - 5:14
  5. "Limbo" (Shorter) - 7:19
  6. "Vonetta" (Shorter) - 5:39
  7. "Nothing Like You" (Bob Dorough/Fran Landesman) - 2:03

Performers[edit]

The lineup differs greatly on the track "Nothing Like You", since it was recorded several years prior:

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bailey, C. Michael (April 11, 2008). "Miles Davis, Miles Smiles, and the Invention of Post Bop". All About Jazz. Retrieved February 23, 2013. 
  2. ^ Erlewine, Stephen Thomas (2011). "Sorcerer - Miles Davis | AllMusic". allmusic.com. Retrieved 2 August 2011. 
  3. ^ Quinn, Bill et al. (2007). Alkyer, Frank; Enright, Ed; Koransky, Jason, eds. The Miles Davis Reader. Hal Leonard Corporation. pp. 244–6. ISBN 1617745707. Retrieved July 20, 2013. 
  4. ^ Campbell, Hernan M. (June 17, 2012). "Miles Davis - Sorcerer". Sputnikmusic. Retrieved July 20, 2013. 
  5. ^ Jack Chambers (1998). Milestones: The Music And Times Of Miles Davis. Da Capo Press. p. 104. ISBN 978-0306808494. 

External links[edit]