South Africans in the United Kingdom

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South Africans in the United Kingdom
Peter Hain.pngSiennaMillerFactoryGirl.jpgMark Shuttleworth.jpg
Notable South Africans in the United Kingdom:
Peter Hain, Sienna Miller, Mark Shuttleworth
Total population
South African-born residents
141,405 (2001 Census figure)
216,000 (ONS 2009 estimate)
Other population estimates
550,000 (Runnymede 2001 estimate)

Up to 1.0% of the UK population
Regions with significant populations
London, South East England
Languages
English, Afrikaans
Religion
Anglicanism · Methodism · Baptism · Pentecostalism · Roman Catholicism.
Related ethnic groups
Zimbabwean British, Kenyan British, Afrikaners, British diaspora in Africa, South African American

South Africans in the United Kingdom include citizens and residents of the United Kingdom with origins in South Africa.

Demographics[edit]

The majority of these people are concentrated in largely affluent areas of London, the anecdotal evidence being that many are business people working in the City of London. There is, for instance, a South African-born cluster in the Canary Wharf area. In fact, London has the second biggest number of South African expatriates in the western world. University towns such as Oxford, Cambridge, Edinburgh and Bristol also show significant clusters of South Africa-born. Many young people with British family ties have come over the years to work in the UK, including the public services.[1]

According to the 2001 UK Census, 140,201 South African born people were calling the UK, although most recent estimates put the population (including those of South African descent) at over half a million. Unlike South Africa itself, the majority of South Africans in the UK are not ethnically black, however White. The 2001 census showed that 90% of South Africans in the UK are White (mainly of British and Afrikaner origin), 3% Black, 3% Indian, 2% Mixed, 2% Other, meaning that there could currently be around 495,000, 16,500, 16,500, 11,000 and 11,000 for each ethnic group respectively in the UK. There is a large number of Jewish South Africans in the UK. It is estimated that 9% of the South African population in London is Jewish, as compared to 2% of Londoners as a whole who would claim to be of the Jewish faith.[2]

Notable South Africans in the United Kingdom[edit]

Individuals who have migrated from South Africa to the UK[edit]

Name Occupation
Jani Allan Journalist and radio personality
Elize du Toit actress
Gary Frisch &
Henry Badenhorst
Co-founders of website, Gaydar
Peter Hain former Secretary of State for Work and Pensions and Welsh Secretary, born in Kenya, he was raised in South Africa and has South African parents
Nicky Hambleton-Jones stylist and television personality
Ronald Harwood playwright
Bob Holness actor & quiz show host
Doreen Mantle actress
Kevin Pietersen Former England Cricket Captain
Lucas Radebe former long-serving Leeds United FC defender
Sir Antony Sher actor & novelist
Mark Shuttleworth billionaire, space tourist and software developer (holds dual citizenship)
Laurens van der Post writer & conservationist
Sid James Actor most famous for starring in the Carry On series of films
Retief Goosen Professional golfer and winner of 2 United States Opens.
Ernie Els Professional golfer and multiple major winner.

British people of South African ancestry[edit]

Name Occupation Link
Natasha Kaplinsky news presenter (South African father of Polish descent)
Joan Collins actress, author and columnist (South African father)
Jackie Collins novelist (South African father)
Sienna Miller actress, model, and fashion designer (South African mother)
Andrew Lincoln actor, director (South African mother)
Christian Bale actor (South African father)
Andrew Strauss England cricketer (South African father)
Andy Zaltzman comedian, radio personality (South African father)
Daniel Radcliffe actor (South African mother)

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Born Abroad – South Africa". BBC News. 2005-09-07. Retrieved 2007-10-17. 
  2. ^ "South African in multi-ethnic Britain". [Runnymede. Retrieved 2008-12-19.