South Australian Cricket Association

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For other uses of SACA, see Saca (disambiguation).
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The South Australian Cricket Association (SACA) is the peak body for the sport of cricket in South Australia. The association runs Adelaide Oval and the Southern Redbacks based in Adelaide, South Australia. SACA is the controlling body for the South Australian Grade Cricket League. The chairman is Andrew Sinclair.

Introduction[edit]

The South Australian Cricket Association (SACA) was formed in 1871 as the "South Australian Cricketing Association"[1] and is the state Cricket body in South Australia. It administers the Grade club cricket competition - the South Australian Grade Cricket League - and the West End Southern Redbacks, South Australia's first-class cricket team as well as, the South Australian Scorpions, the State's women's team in the Women’s National Cricket League (WNCL) and Women’s T20 (WT20) .

SACA's stated aim is to promote and develop the game of cricket in South Australia. The SACA has a membership base of more than 28,000 members and an elected Board which governs the activities of the Association.

In 2009, following negotiations with SACA, SANFL and the AFL, Premier Mike Rann announced that the South Australian Government would make an investment of $450 million to redevelop Adelaide Oval in order to improve amenities and enable AFL football to be played there.[2] The following year Treasurer Kevin Foley announced that the government contribution would increase to $535 million.[3] In 2011 more than 80% of SACA members voted in favour of the redevelopment.[4]

South Australian Grade Cricket League[edit]

The SAGCL is the state (metro Adelaide) cricket league of South Australia. The league administers structured competitions ranging from SACA’s Ray Sutton Shield competition for Under 13’s through to the West End A Grade competition.

Clubs[edit]

There are 13 clubs in the SACA Grade cricket competition. All clubs field four senior teams and 12 of the clubs (University being the notable exception) have four junior teams competing in regular weekend competitions.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "South Australian Cricketing Association". South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900) (Adelaide, SA: National Library of Australia). 1 June 1871. p. 6. Retrieved 30 September 2012.  The "ing" was dropped between the 1898 and 1899 A.G.M.s
  2. ^ Michael Owen, The Australian, December 3 2009
  3. ^ ABC News, May 26 2010, "Another $85 million poured in to Adelaide Oval"
  4. ^ 891 ABC, "Adelaide Oval Revamp given the green light"

External links[edit]