South Devon Railway Eagle class

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South Devon Railway Eagle class
Type and origin
Power type Steam
Designer Daniel Gooch
Builder Slaughter, Grüning and Company
Serial number 360–368, 411–412, 522, 559, 591–593
Build date 1859–1865
Total produced 16
Specifications
Configuration 4-4-0ST
UIC classification 2′B n2t
Gauge 7 ft 14 in (2,140 mm)
Leading wheel
diameter
3 ft 6 in (1.067 m)
Driver diameter 5 ft 6 in (1.676 m)
Wheelbase 18 ft 0 in (5.49 m)
Water capacity 1,100 imp gal (5,000 l; 1,300 US gal)
Cylinder size 16 12 in × 24 in (419 mm × 610 mm)
Career
Operator(s)
Class Eagle
Withdrawn 1876–1892
Disposition All scrapped

The Eagle class were sixteen 4-4-0 saddle tank broad gauge locomotives operated on the South Devon Railway, Cornwall Railway and associated adjacent railways. They were designed for passenger trains on this steep and sharply curved line but were also used on goods trains when required.

They were ordered by Evans, Walker and Gooch who were contracted to operate the locomotives for both the railways. They were designed by Daniel Gooch a development of his earlier Comet class with slightly smaller wheels and larger tanks containing 1,100 gallons, a 37.5% increase, and built by Slaughter, Grüning and Company.

From 1 July 1866 the locomotives were bought by the South Devon Railway, after which they were operated as a combined fleet over both railways, but they continued to be accounted to their original owner. On 1 February 1876 the South Devon Railway was amalgamated with the Great Western Railway, the locomotives were given numbers by their new owners but continued to carry their names too.

Locomotives[edit]

South Devon Railway[edit]

  • Hawk (Slaughter, Grüning & Co. 591? of 1859); GWR no. 2108; withdrawn 1885
Named after the bird of prey, hawk.
  • Giraffe (SG 365 of 1859); – 1877) GWR no. 2112; withdrawn 18
Giraffe hauled the first train on the Launceston and South Devon Railway on 1 June 1865 with Dart.
The locomotive was named after the animal, giraffe.
  • Lion (SG 366 of 1859); GWR no. 2113; withdrawn 1883
Named after the powerful animal, lion.
  • Antelope (SG 367 of 1859); GWR no. 2114; withdrawn 1884
Named after the swift animal, antelope.
  • Tiger (SG 411 of 1860); GWR no. 2116; withdrawn 1884
Named after the powerful animal, tiger.
  • Hector (SG 412 of 1860); GWR no. 2117; withdrawn 1892
Named after the Greek mythological character, Hector.
  • Dart (SG 559 of 1863); GWR no. 2119; withdrawn 1885
Dart hauled the first train on the Launceston and South Devon Railway on 1 June 1865 with Giraffe.
The locomotive was named after the dart missile.

Cornwall Railway[edit]

  • Eagle (SG 360 of 1859); GWR no. 2106; withdrawn 1876
Named after the bird of prey, eagle.
  • Elk (SG 361 of 1859); GWR no. 2107; withdrawn 1877
Just two days after the opening of the railway Elk was derailed near St Germans and fell off Grove viaduct with fatal consequences.
The locomotive was named after the animal, elk.
  • Lynx (SG 363 of 1859); GWR no. 2109; withdrawn 1876
Named after the strong animal, lynx.
  • Gazelle (SG 364 of 1859); GWR no. 2110; withdrawn 1865
Named after the swift animal, gazelle.
  • Mazeppa (SG 362 of 1859); GWR no. 2111; withdrawn 1885
Named after an epic poem, Mazeppa by Lord Byron.
  • Wolf (SG 368 of 1859); GWR no. 2115; withdrawn 1878
Named after the strong animal, wolf.
  • Cato (SG 522 of 1863); GWR no. 2118; withdrawn 1877
Cato was a name shared by many famous Romans.
  • Pollux (SG 592 of 1865); GWR no. 2120; withdrawn 1892
Named after the Greek mythological character, Pollux, it had originally been intended to be named Tamar after the River Tamar.
  • Castor (SG 593 of 1865) GWR no. 2121; withdrawn 1882
Named after the Greek mythological character' Castor, it had originally intended to be named Fal after the River Fal.

References[edit]

  • Beck, Keith & Copsey, John (1990). The Great Western in South Devon. Didcot: Wild Swan Publications. ISBN 0-901115-32-0. 
  • Gregory, R. H. (1982). The South Devon Railway. Salisbury: The Oakwood Press. ISBN 0-85361-286-2. 
  • Reed, P. J. T. (February 1953). White, D. E., ed. The Locomotives of the Great Western Railway, Part 2: Broad Gauge. Kenilworth: RCTS. ISBN 0-901115-32-0. 
  • Waters, Laurence (1999). The Great Western Broad Gauge. Hersham: Ian Allan. ISBN 0-7110-2634-3. 
  • Railway company records at The National Archives