Southeast Asian Games

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"SEA Games" redirects here. For other uses, see SEA Games (disambiguation).
Southeast Asian Games
SEA Games Logo.png
The Southeast Asian Games Federation logo and flag; the eleven circles represent the ten ASEAN nations and Timor-Leste.
Abbreviation SEA Games
First event 12–17 December 1959 in Bangkok, Thailand
Occur every 2 years
Last event 11–22 December 2013 in Naypyidaw, Myanmar
Website www.seagfoffice.org

The Southeast Asian Games (also known as the SEA Games), is a biennial multi-sport event involving participants from the current 11 countries of Southeast Asia. The games is under regulation of the Southeast Asian Games Federation with supervision by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) and the Olympic Council of Asia.

History[edit]

The Southeast Asian Games owes its origins to the South East Asian Peninsula Games or SEAP Games. On 22 May 1958, delegates from the countries in Southeast Asian peninsula attending the Asian Games in Tokyo, Japan had a meeting and agreed to establish a sport organisation. The SEAP Games was conceptualised by Luang Sukhum Nayaoradit, then Vice-President of the Thailand Olympic Committee. The proposed rationale was that a regional sports event will help promote co-operation, understanding and relations among countries in the Southeast Asian region.

Thailand, Burma (now Myanmar), Malaya (now Malaysia), Laos, South Vietnam and Cambodia (with Singapore included thereafter) were the founding members. These countries agreed to hold the Games biennially. The SEAP Games Federation Committee was formed.

The first SEAP Games were held in Bangkok from 12–17 December 1959 comprising more than 527 athletes and officials from Thailand, Burma, Malaya (now Malaysia), Singapore, South Vietnam and Laos participating in 12 sports.

At the 8th SEAP Games in 1975, the SEAP Federation considered the inclusion of Brunei, Indonesia and the Philippines. These countries were formally admitted in 1977, the same year when SEAP Federation changed their name to Southeast Asian Games Federation (SEAGF), and the games were known as the Southeast Asian Games. East Timor was admitted at the 22nd Southeast Asian Games in Vietnam.

The 2009 Southeast Asian Games was the first time Laos has ever hosted a Southeast Asian Games (Laos had previously declined hosting the 1965 Southeast Asian Peninsular Games citing financial difficulties). Running from 9–18 December, it has also commemorated the 50 years of the Southeast Asian Games, held in Vientiane, Laos.

The most recent host for the Games was Myanmar in 2013, while Singapore will host the upcoming Games. Cambodia is yet to host the SEA games. At first starting 2019, the Asian Games will fall on the same year as the Southeast Asian Games but Vietnam then declined to host the 2019 Asian Games.

Participating countries[edit]

Nation / IOC Designation Debuted IOC-Code Notes
 Cambodia
1959
CAM
 Laos (IOC designation: Lao People's Democratic Republic)
1959
LAO
 Malaysia
1959
MAS
 Burma
1959
MYA
BIR 1948–1992
 Singapore
1959
SIN
 Thailand
1959
THA
 Vietnam (IOC designation: Viet Nam)
1959
VIE
 Brunei (IOC designation: Brunei Darussalam)
1977
BRU
 Indonesia
1977
INA
IHO 1952
FIFA-code IDN
 Philippines
1977
PHI
ISO PHL
 Timor-Leste
2003
TLS
IOA 2000

Sports[edit]

Below was the list of the types of sports played in the SEAG from 1959. the bullet mark () indicates that the sport was played in the respective year.

Sport 59 61 65 67 69 71 73 75 77 79 81 83 85 87 89 91 93 95 97 99 01 03 05 07 09 11 13
Aquatics
Archery
Arnis2
Athletics
Badminton
Baseball
Basketball
Billiards and Snooker1
Bodybuilding1
Bowling1
Boxing
Bridge
Canoe/Kayak
Chess1
Chinlone2
Cycling
Dancesport3
Equestrian
Fencing
Finswimming1
Football
Futsal1
Golfo
Gymnastics
Handball
Hockey
Judo
Karate1
Kenpō
Lawn bowls3
Muay2
Paragliding
Pencak Silat2
Pétanque2
Polo1
Rowing
Roller Sport
Rugby union
Sailing
Sepak Takraw1
Shooting
Shuttle cock2
Softball
Soft Tennis1
Squash1
Table tennis
Taekwondo
Tennis
Traditional boat race1
Triathlon
Volleyball4
Waterskio
Weightlifting
Wrestling
Wushu1
Vovinam
Wall climbing
Total events 12 13 12 16 15 15 16 18 18 18 18 18 22 26 26 27 27 30 34 17 33 29 40 43 25 41 35
  • 1 – not an official Olympic Sport.
  • 2 – sport played only in the SEAG.
  • 3 – not a traditional Olympic nor SEAG Sport and introduced only by the host country.
  • 4 – Beach volleyball was introduced in 1993.
  • o – a former official Olympic Sport, not applied in previous host countries and was introduced only by the host country.
  • h – sport not played in the previous edition and was reintroduced by the host country.
  • e – Netball was included in 2001.[1]

Host nations and cities[edit]

Since the Southeast Asian Games began in 1959, it has been held in 15 different cities across all Southeast Asian countries except Cambodia and Timor Leste. Cambodia will play host for the first time in 2023.

Location of the Southeast Asian Games Host

Criticism[edit]

The games is unique in that there are no official limits to the number of sports which may be contested, and the range may be decided by the organising host pending approval by the Southeast Asian Games Federation. Albeit for some core sports which must be featured, the host is also free to drop or introduce other sports.

This leeway has resulted in hosts maximising their medal hauls by dropping sports which are disadvantages to themselves relative to their peers, and the introduction of obscure sports, often at short notice, thus preventing most other nations from building up credible opponents. Some examples of these include:

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]