South Norfolk (UK Parliament constituency)

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South Norfolk
County constituency
for the House of Commons
Outline map
Boundary of South Norfolk in Norfolk.
Outline map
Location of Norfolk within England.
County Norfolk
Electorate 77,316 (December 2010)[1]
Current constituency
Created 1868
Member of Parliament Richard Bacon (Conservative)
Number of members One (Two 1868-1885)
Overlaps
European Parliament constituency East of England

South Norfolk is a constituency[n 1] represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2001 by Richard Bacon, a Conservative.[n 2]

History[edit]

History of boundaries[edit]

Following the Reform Act 1832 the historic county constituency Norfolk was for the first time split into two, two member, county divisions - East Norfolk and West Norfolk.

The Reform Act 1867 led, the following year, to the county's redistribution into three, two member, county divisions. The three divisions, from the United Kingdom general election, 1868 became this one, the North and modified Western division.

The Southern division had its place of election[n 3] at Norwich. This was the same place of election as the abolished Eastern division. In 1868 the same two MPs who had sat for East Norfolk before its end were re-elected from this constituency.

Under the provisions of the Redistribution of Seats Act 1885, single member constituencies became the norm and greater equalisation in electorate occurred. In Norfolk the three, two member, county divisions were changed to six single member seats. These were this constituency, a revived East Norfolk, Mid Norfolk, North Norfolk, North West Norfolk and South West Norfolk

In the 1885 redistribution this constituency bordered Mid Norfolk to the west, the borough constituency of Norwich and East Norfolk to the north, the borough of Great Yarmouth and the Suffolk constituency of Lowestoft to the east and another Suffolk division, Eye, to the south.

The Southern division was very agricultural in character.[citation needed] The largest town was Diss, which had a population of fewer than 4,000 people in 1900.

From the Representation of the People Act 1918, the constituency comprised the local government divisions:

1918-1950: Diss Urban District and the Rural Districts of Depwade, Forehoe, Henstead, Wayland with part of Thetford.

1950-1974: The Municipal Borough of Thetford, the Urban Districts of Diss and Wymondham and the Rural Districts of Depwade, Loddon and Wayland; combined to produce a somewhat more urban constituency than before.

1974-1983: The constituency was unchanged except for the addition of Forehoe and Henstead Rural District. This was the last redistribution before a major reorganisation of local government, which amalgamated many of the smaller local authorities.

1983-1997: A further reduction meant the seat consisted of the entire District of South Norfolk. The other part of the old seat (in Thetford and Wayland) was transferred to the South West Norfolk constituency in the 1983 redistribution.

1997 redistribution: Continuing population growth led to a reduction in the area of the constituency. It comprised the wards of the District of South Norfolk except the Cringleford and Colney and New Costessey wards.

Boundaries[edit]

For the 2010 general election, the Boundary Commission for England reduced the wide part of the District of South Norfolk comprising the constituency: eight wards became part of other seats. From then, the seat has electoral wards:

Beck Vale, Bressingham and Burston, Brooke, Bunwell, Chedgrave and Thurton, Cringleford, Dickleburgh, Diss, Ditchingham and Broome, Earsham, Easton, Forncett, Gillingham, Harleston, Hempnall, Hethersett, Loddon, Mulbarton, Newton Flotman, Old Costessey, Poringland with the Framinghams, Rockland, Roydon, Scole, Stoke Holy Cross, Stratton, Tasburgh, and Thurlton.[2]

Members of Parliament[edit]

MPs 1868 – 1885 (two seats)[edit]

Election 1st Member[3] 1st Party 2nd Member[3] 2nd Party
1868 Clare Sewell Read Conservative Edward Howes Conservative
1871 Sir Robert Jacob Buxton, Bt Conservative
1880 Robert Thornhagh Gurdon Liberal
1885 representation reduced to one member

MPs since 1885 (one seat)[edit]

William Cozens-Hardy
Election Member[3] Party
1885 Francis Taylor Liberal
1886 Liberal Unionist
1898 Arthur Wellesley Soames Liberal
1918 Hon. William Cozens-Hardy a Liberal
1919 Coalition Liberal
1920 George Edwards Labour
1922 Thomas William Hay Conservative
1923 George Edwards Labour
1924 James Archibald Christie Conservative
1945 Christopher Mayhew Labour
1950 Peter Baker b Conservative
1955 by-election John Hill Conservative
Feb 1974 John MacGregor Conservative
2001 Richard Bacon Conservative

Notes:-

  • a Cozens-Hardy stood at the United Kingdom general election, 1918 as a Liberal without the Coalition "coupon", but he took the Coalition Liberal whip when Parliament assembled in 1919.
  • b Baker was expelled from the House of Commons in 1954 after being convicted of fraud, forgery and uttering and sentenced to seven years imprisonment.

Elections[edit]

Elections in the 2010s[edit]

General Election 2015: South Norfolk
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Richard Bacon


General Election 2010: South Norfolk
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Richard Bacon 27,133 49.3 +4.6
Liberal Democrat Jacky Howe 16,193 29.4 -0.4
Labour Mick Castle 7,252 13.2 -9.3
UKIP Evan Heasley 2,329 4.2 +1.4
BNP Helen Mitchell 1,086 2.0 +2.0
Green Jo Willcott 1,000 1.8 +1.8
Majority 10,940 19.9
Turnout 54,993 72.2 +3.1
Conservative hold Swing +3.3

Elections in the 2000s[edit]

General Election 2005: South Norfolk
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Richard Bacon 26,399 44.8 +2.6
Liberal Democrat Ian Mack 17,617 29.9 +0.0
Labour John Morgan 13,262 22.5 -2.0
UKIP Philip Tye 1,696 2.9 +1.4
Majority 8,782 14.9
Turnout 58,974 68.7 +1.1
Conservative hold Swing 1.3
General Election 2001: South Norfolk
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Richard Bacon 23,589 42.2 +2.0
Liberal Democrat Anne Lee 16,696 29.9 +1.6
Labour Mark Wells 13,719 24.5 -1.5
Green Stephanie Ross-Wagenknect 1,069 1.9 +1.1
UKIP Joe Neal 856 1.5 +0.9
Majority 6,893 12.3
Turnout 55,929 67.6 -10.7
Conservative hold Swing 0.2

Elections in the 1990s[edit]

General Election 1997: South Norfolk
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative John MacGregor 24,935 40.2 -12.4
Liberal Democrat B Hacker 17,557 28.3 +1.3
Labour J Ross 16,188 26.1 +8.0
Referendum Party P Bateson 2,533 4.1 +4.1
Green S Ross-Wagenknecht 484 0.8 -0.2
UKIP A Boddy 400 0.6 +0.6
Majority 7,378 11.9 -13.7
Turnout 79,239 78.37 -5.62
Conservative hold Swing -6.8
General Election 1992: South Norfolk[4]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative John MacGregor 36,081 52.6 -0.8
Liberal Democrat Christopher Brocklebank-Fowler 18,516 27.0 -6.9
Labour CJ Needle 12,422 18.1 +5.4
Green S Ross-Wagenknecht 702 1.0 +1.0
Natural Law N Clark 320 0.5 +0.5
Independent R Peacock 304 0.4 +0.4
Independent Conservative R Watkins 232 0.3 +0.3
Majority 17,565 25.6 +6.0
Turnout 68,577 83.99 -3.03
Conservative hold Swing +3.0

Elections in the 1980s[edit]

General Election 1987: South Norfolk
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative John MacGregor 33,912 53.4 -0.8
Liberal RAP Carden 21,494 33.9 +1.1
Labour L Addison 8,047 12.7 -0.3
Majority 12,418 19.6 -1.8
Turnout 63,453 80.96 +3.75
Conservative hold Swing -0.9
General Election 1983: South Norfolk
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative John MacGregor 30,747 54.2 -0.3
Liberal RA Carden 18,612 32.8 +17.5
Labour HA Holzer 7,408 13.0 -17.2
Majority 12,135 21.4 +9.4
Turnout 56,767 77.21 -1.94
Conservative hold Swing +4.7

Elections in the 1970s[edit]

General Election 1979: South Norfolk
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative John MacGregor 42,792 54.5 +9.0
Labour PJ Davies 23,755 30.2 -2.6
Liberal J Bristol 11,990 15.3 -5.9
Majority 19,037 24.2 +11.5
Turnout 78,537 78.35 +2.15
Conservative hold Swing +5.8
General Election October 1974: South Norfolk
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative John MacGregor 31,478 45.5 +1.2
Labour H Gray 22,713 32.8 +3.2
Liberal M Scott 14,687 21.2 -4.4
United Democratic Party CC Fairhead 317 0.5 +0.0
Majority 8,765 12.7 -2.1
Turnout 69195 76.20 -6.59
Conservative hold Swing -1.0
General Election February 1974: South Norfolk
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative John MacGregor 33,059 44.3
Labour RJ Truman 22,040 29.6
Liberal M Scott 19,115 25.6
Independent Progressive CC Fairhead 337 0.5
Majority 11,019 14.8
Turnout 74,551 82.79
Conservative hold Swing
General Election 1970: South Norfolk
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative John Edward Bernard Hill 22,614 51.9
Labour C Shaw 17,172 39.4
Liberal Basil E Goldstone 3,811 8.7
Majority 5,442 12.5
Turnout 43,597 78.50
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1960s[edit]

General Election 1966: South Norfolk
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative John Edward Bernard Hill 16,968 44.78
Labour GBL Bennett 16,849 44.46
Liberal RL Crouch 4,079 10.76
Majority 119 0.31
Turnout 81.40
Conservative hold Swing
General Election 1964: South Norfolk
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative John Edward Bernard Hill 17,178 46.42
Labour FR Thompson 15,012 40.56
Liberal BHP Turner 4,819 13.02
Majority 2,166 5.85
Turnout 82.66
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1950s[edit]

General election 1959: South Norfolk
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative John Hill 19,275 53.8 +1.7
Labour J.M. Stewart 16,542 46.2 −1.7
Majority 2,733 7.6 +3.5
Turnout 35,817 82.4 +0.6
Conservative hold Swing +1.7
General election May 1955: South Norfolk
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative John Hill 18,690 52.1 +0.6
Labour J.M. Stewart 17,215 47.9 −0.6
Majority 1,475 4.11 +1.2
Turnout 35,905 81.8
Conservative hold Swing +0.6
South Norfolk by-election January 1955
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative John Hill 15,119 51.5 −3.0
Labour J.M. Stewart 14,254 48.5 +3.0
Majority 865 2.9 −6.1
Turnout 29,373
Conservative hold Swing −3.0
General election 1951: South Norfolk
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Peter Arthur David Baker 19,610 54.5 +4.0
Labour L. Scutts 16,371 45.5 +1.8
Majority 3,239 9.0 +3.2
Turnout 35,981 82.4 −1.2
Conservative hold Swing +1.1
General election 1950: South Norfolk
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Peter Arthur David Baker 18,143 50.5 +18.0
Labour Christopher Paget Mayhew 15,714 43.7 −6.6
Liberal George Q Bryant 2,097 5.8 N/A
Majority 2,439 6.8 N/A
Turnout 35,954 83.6 +24.6
Conservative gain from Labour Swing +12.3

Election in the 1940s[edit]

General Election 1945: Norfolk Southern
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Labour Christopher Mayhew 16,825 50.30
Conservative JS Allen 10,862 32.47
Independent Conservative JH Wilson 5,761 17.22
Majority 5,963 17.83
Turnout 69.03
Labour gain from Conservative Swing

Elections in the 1940s[edit]

General Election 1935: Norfolk Southern
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative James Archibald Christie 18,420 57.87
Labour CG Clark 13,409 42.13
Majority 5,011 15.74
Turnout 73.52
Conservative hold Swing
General Election 1931: Norfolk Southern
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative James Archibald Christie 21,195 65.53
Labour EG Gooch 11,148 34.47
Majority 10,047 31.06
Turnout 77.84
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1920s[edit]

South Norfolk by-election, 1920
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Labour George Edwards 8,594 45.7 +10.0
Coalition Liberal James Henley Batty 6,476 34.5 −29.8
Liberal Charles Henry Roberts 3,718 19.8 N/A
Majority 2,118 11.2 −17.4
Turnout 18,788 58.5
Labour gain from Coalition Liberal Swing

See also[edit]

Notes and references[edit]

Notes
  1. ^ A county constituency (for the purposes of election expenses and type of returning officer)
  2. ^ As with all constituencies, the constituency elects one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first past the post system of election at least every five years. However from 1868-85 the constituency elected two members (see history)
  3. ^ Where the hustings stood, at which nominations were made, votes cast before the introduction of multiple polling districts in county constituencies and the result was declared)
References

Sources[edit]

  • Boundaries of Parliamentary Constituencies 1885-1972, compiled and edited by F.W.S. Craig (Parliamentary Reference Publications 1972)
  • British Parliamentary Constituencies: A Statistical Compendium, by Ivor Crewe and Anthony Fox (Faber and Faber 1984)
  • British Parliamentary Election Results 1832-1885, compiled and edited by F.W.S. Craig (The Macmillan Press 1977)
  • British Parliamentary Election Results 1885-1918, compiled and edited by F.W.S. Craig (Macmillan Press 1974)
  • British Parliamentary Election Results 1918-1949, compiled and edited by F.W.S. Craig (Macmillan Press, revised edition 1977)
  • British Parliamentary Election Results 1950-1973, compiled and edited by F.W.S. Craig (Parliamentary Research Services 1983)
  • Social Geography of British Elections 1885-1910. by Henry Pelling (Macmillan 1967)
  • Who's Who of British Members of Parliament: Volume I 1832-1885, edited by M. Stenton (The Harvester Press 1976)
  • Who's Who of British Members of Parliament, Volume II 1886-1918, edited by M. Stenton and S. Lees (Harvester Press 1978)
  • Who's Who of British Members of Parliament, Volume III 1919-1945, edited by M. Stenton and S. Lees (Harvester Press 1979)
  • Who's Who of British Members of Parliament, Volume IV 1945-1979, edited by M. Stenton and S. Lees (Harvester Press 1981)

Coordinates: 52°30′N 1°24′E / 52.5°N 1.4°E / 52.5; 1.4