Southeastern Conference Men's Basketball Player of the Year

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SEC Men's Basketball Player of the Year
SEC new logo.png
Awarded for the most outstanding basketball player in the Southeastern Conference
Country United States
First awarded 1965
Currently held by Scottie Wilbekin, Florida

The Southeastern Conference (SEC) Men's Basketball Player of the Year is an award given to the player who has proven himself, throughout the season, to be the most exceptional talent in the Southeastern Conference. The school with the most SEC Player of the Year award winners is Kentucky, with 14 total awards. Three current SEC members have never had a winner: Missouri, South Carolina, and Texas A&M. However, of these three schools, only South Carolina joined the SEC before 2012.

Three different organizations have given this award: United Press International (1965–1992), Associated Press (1965–present), and the SEC coaches (1987–present).

Key[edit]

Co-Players of the Year
* Awarded a national Player of the Year award:
Helms Foundation College Basketball Player of the Year (1904–05 to 1978–79)
UPI College Basketball Player of the Year (1954–55 to 1995–96)
Naismith College Player of the Year (1968–69 to present)
John R. Wooden Award (1976–77 to present)
Associated Press selection
SEC coaches selection
¥ United Press International selection
Player (X) Denotes the number of times the player received the SEC Player of the Year award at that point

Winners[edit]

Pat Riley, wearing a black suit with a dark green and silver tie, is throwing his hands in the air as he celebrates a good play.
Pat Riley shared the award in 1966 with Clyde Lee.
Dominique Wilkins is taking a rest during a 1996 Panathinaikos Euroleague game. His #12 uniform is green with the Beck's beer logo on the front.
Dominique Wilkins won the award as a sophomore in 1981.
A close-up of Charles Barkley's face; he is smiling broadly and is wearing a white shirt.
Charles Barkley was a winner playing for Auburn.
Shaquille O'Neal is taking a free throw while playig for the Phoenix Suns.
Shaquille O'Neal won back-to-back in 1991 and 1992 for the LSU Tigers.
Season Player[a] School Position Class Reference
1964–65 Clyde Lee Vanderbilt Center/Power forward Junior
1965–66 Clyde Lee¥ (2) Vanderbilt Center/Power forward Senior
1965–66 Pat Riley Kentucky Shooting guard/Small forward Senior
1966–67 Ron Widby Tennessee Small forward Senior
1967–68 Pete Maravich LSU Point guard Sophomore
1968–69 Pete Maravich (2) LSU Point guard Junior
1969–70 Pete Maravich* (3) LSU Point guard Senior
1970–71 Johnny Neumann Ole Miss Shooting guard/Small forward Sophomore
1971–72 Mike Edwards¥ Tennessee Shooting guard Junior
1971–72 Tom Parker Kentucky Power forward Senior
1972–73 Kevin Grevey Kentucky Shooting guard/Small forward Sophomore
1972–73 Wendell Hudson‡¥ Alabama Small forward Senior
1973–74 Jan van Breda Kolff Vanderbilt Shooting guard/Small forward Senior
1974–75 Kevin Grevey‡ (2) Kentucky Shooting guard/Small forward Senior
1974–75 Bernard King¥ Tennessee Small forward Sophomore
1975–76 Bernard King¥ (2) Tennessee Small forward Junior
1976–77 Ernie Grunfeld‡¥ Tennessee Small forward Senior
1976–77 Bernard King¥ (3) Tennessee Small forward Senior
1977–78 Reggie King Alabama Small forward Junior
1978–79 Reggie King (2) Alabama Small forward Senior
1979–80 Kyle Macy Kentucky Guard Senior
1980–81 Dominique Wilkins Georgia Small forward Junior
1981–82 Dale Ellis Tennessee Shooting guard/Small forward Junior
1982–83 Dale Ellis‡ (2) Tennessee Shooting guard/Small forward Senior
1982–83 Jeff Malone¥ Mississippi State Shooting guard Senior
1983–84 Charles Barkley Auburn Center Junior
1984–85 Kenny Walker Kentucky Power forward Junior
1985–86 Kenny Walker (2) Kentucky Power forward Senior
1986–87 Derrick McKey‡¥₮ Alabama Power forward Junior
1986–87 Tony White¥ Tennessee Point guard Senior
1987–88 Will Perdue Vanderbilt Center Senior
1988–89 Chris Jackson[b] LSU Point guard Freshman
1989–90 Chris Jackson[b] (2) LSU Point guard Sophomore
1990–91 Shaquille O'Neal* LSU Center Sophomore
1991–92 Shaquille O'Neal (2) LSU Center Junior
1992–93 Billy McCaffrey Vanderbilt Shooting guard Junior
1992–93 Jamal Mashburn‡₮ Kentucky Shooting guard/Small forward Junior
1993–94 Corliss Williamson Arkansas Power forward Sophomore
1994–95 Corliss Williamson (2) Arkansas Power forward Junior
1995–96 Tony Delk Kentucky Point guard Senior
1996–97 Ron Mercer Kentucky Small forward/Shooting guard Sophomore
1997–98 Ansu Sesay Ole Miss Power forward Senior
1998–99 Chris Porter Auburn Small forward/Power forward Junior
1999–00 Dan Langhi‡₮ Vanderbilt Small forward Junior
1999–00 Stromile Swift LSU Center Sophomore
2000–01 Prince, TayshaunTayshaun Prince Kentucky Small forward Junior
2001–02 Dudley, ErwinErwin Dudley Alabama Power forward/Center Junior
2002–03 Bogans, KeithKeith Bogans Kentucky Shooting guard Senior [1]
2002–03 Slay, RonRon Slay Tennessee Power forward Senior [1]
2003–04 Roberts, LawrenceLawrence Roberts Mississippi State Power forward Junior [2]
2004–05 Bass, BrandonBrandon Bass LSU Power forward Sophomore [3]
2005–06 Davis, GlenGlen Davis LSU Center Sophomore [4]
2006–07 Byars, DerrickDerrick Byars Vanderbilt Shooting guard/Small forward Senior
2006–07 Lofton, ChrisChris Lofton Tennessee Shooting guard Sophomore [5]
2007–08 Foster, ShanShan Foster Vanderbilt Shooting guard/Small forward Senior [6][7]
2008–09 Thornton, MarcusMarcus Thornton LSU Shooting guard Senior [8][9]
2009–10 Wall, JohnJohn Wall Kentucky Point guard Freshman [10]
2010–11 Parsons, ChandlerChandler Parsons Florida Small forward Senior [11][12]
2011–12 Davis, AnthonyAnthony Davis* Kentucky Center Freshman [13][14]
2012–13 Caldwell-Pope, KentaviousKentavious Caldwell-Pope Georgia Shooting guard Sophomore [15][16]
2013–14 Wilbekin, ScottieScottie Wilbekin Florida Point guard Senior [17][18]

Winners by school[edit]

School (year joined) Winners Years
Kentucky (1932) 14 1966, 1972, 1973, 1975, 1980, 1985, 1986, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2001, 2003, 2010, 2012
LSU (1932) 11 1968, 1969, 1970, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 2000, 2005, 2006, 2009
Tennessee (1932) 11 1967, 1972, 1975, 1976, 1977 (×2)[c], 1982, 1983, 1987, 2003, 2007
Vanderbilt (1932) 8 1965, 1966, 1974, 1988, 1993, 2000, 2007, 2008
Alabama (1932) 5 1973, 1978, 1979, 1987, 2002
Ole Miss (1932) 2 1971, 1998
Mississippi State (1932) 2 1983, 2004
Arkansas (1991) 2 1994, 1995
Auburn (1932) 2 1984, 1999
Florida (1932) 2 2011, 2014
Georgia (1932) 2 1981, 2013
Missouri (2012) 0
South Carolina (1991) 0
Texas A&M (2012) 0

Footnotes[edit]

  • a If no special demarcation indicates which award the player won that season, then he had earned all of the awards available for that year.
  • b Chris Jackson changed his name to Mahmoud Abdul-Rauf in 1991 after converting to Islam.[19]
  • c In 1976–77, two Tennessee players were chosen as the SEC Player of the Year—Ernie Grunfeld and Bernard King were selected by the Associated Press, and Grunfeld was also chosen by United Press International. Both players are counted in the total Player of the Year Award per school tally.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "SEC Men's Basketball – Year in Review". Southeastern Conference. 2003-04-09. Archived from the original on 2007-09-27. Retrieved 2007-06-21. 
  2. ^ "SEC Men's Basketball – Year in Review". Southeastern Conference. 2004-05-14. Archived from the original on 2007-09-30. Retrieved 2007-06-21. 
  3. ^ "2004-05 SEC Men's Basketball Year in Review". Southeastern Conference. 2005-04-20. Archived from the original on 2007-09-27. Retrieved 2007-06-21. 
  4. ^ "SEC Men's Basketball Release – Final 2005-06". Southeastern Conference. 2006-04-12. Archived from the original on 2007-09-27. Retrieved 2007-06-21. 
  5. ^ "2006-07 SEC Men's Basketball Year in Review". Southeastern Conference. 2007-05-03. Archived from the original on 2007-09-30. Retrieved 2007-06-21. 
  6. ^ "2008 SEC Men's Basketball Awards Announced". Southeastern Conference. 2008-03-11. Archived from the original on 2008-03-14. Retrieved 2008-03-11. 
  7. ^ Associated Press (2008-03-17). "Foster, Pearl, Calathes claim honors on Associated Press All-SEC team". ESPN.com. Retrieved 2008-03-18. 
  8. ^ "2009 SEC Men's Basketball Awards Announced" (Press release). Southeastern Conference. 2009-03-10. Retrieved 2009-03-10. 
  9. ^ Associated Press (2009-03-16). "AP All-SEC Men's Basketball Team Announced". Southeastern Conference. Retrieved 2009-03-17. [dead link]
  10. ^ "2010 SEC Men's Basketball Awards Announced" (Press release). Southeastern Conference. 2010-03-08. Retrieved 2010-03-08. 
  11. ^ "2011 SEC Men's Basketball Awards Announced" (Press release). Southeastern Conference. 2011-03-08. Retrieved 2011-03-08. 
  12. ^ "Parsons, Donovan, Jones honored on AP All-SEC team" (Press release). Fox News. 2011-03-14. Retrieved 2011-03-14. 
  13. ^ "2012 SEC Men's Basketball Awards Announced" (Press release). Southeastern Conference. 2012-03-06. Retrieved 2011-03-06. 
  14. ^ "Vandy's Jenkins unanimous AP All-SEC team pick" (Press release). MSNBC.com. March 12, 2012. Retrieved March 18, 2012. 
  15. ^ "2013 SEC Men’s Basketball Awards Announced" (Press release). Southeastern Conference. 2013-03-12. Retrieved 2013-03-12. 
  16. ^ Associated Press (March 19, 2013). "UGa's Caldwell-Pope wins AP's SEC player of year". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved March 19, 2013. 
  17. ^ "2014 SEC Men's Basketball Awards Announced" (Press release). Southeastern Conference. March 11, 2014. Retrieved March 11, 2014. 
  18. ^ "Wilbekin, Donovan, Randle take AP SEC honors". Sports Illustrated. Associated Press. March 17, 2014. Retrieved March 18, 2014. 
  19. ^ "Playing by the Rules". Transcript. Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). 14 March 1996. Retrieved 4 September 2009.