Souther–Hillman–Furay Band

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The Souther Hillman Furay Band (SHF) was a country rock supergroup led by singer-songwriters Richie Furay (Buffalo Springfield, Poco), Chris Hillman (The Byrds, The Flying Burrito Brothers, Manassas), and J.D. Souther (Longbranch Pennywhistle, noted songwriter for Linda Ronstadt and the Eagles). The band recorded two albums during the 1970s before breaking up due to the disagreements between the members.

History[edit]

The band was formed in 1973 at the suggestion of David Geffen, then head of Asylum Records. Hillman brought three other former members of Manassas to the group: pianist Paul Harris and percussionist Joe Lala, both of whom had also worked with Barnstorm; and pedal steel guitarist Al Perkins, who had also played with the Flying Burrito Brothers. The septet was rounded out by session drummer and former member of Derek & the Dominos and Traffic Jim Gordon.

The band had a substantial hit in 1974 with its self-titled first album, which was certified gold, and the single "Fallin' in Love" (US #27). However, during the recording of that album, and influenced by Perkins, Furay converted to evangelical Christianity.[1] Tensions among the members increased, and Gordon, who may have been experiencing the onset of schizophrenia, left the band and was replaced by Ron Grinel. Souther and Hillman formed the satiric "Heathen Defense League" in reaction to the efforts by Furay and Perkins to save them. In the midst of this chaos, SHF's 1975 album Trouble in Paradise was not critically or commercially well received. Soon after, the group disbanded and its namesake members continued on their solo careers.

Discography[edit]

Members[edit]

Notes[edit]

References[edit]