Southern Arkansas University

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Southern Arkansas University
SAU seal.png
Established 1909
Type Public university
Endowment $14.5 million[1]
President David Rankin
Students 3,404
Undergraduates 2,775
Postgraduates 449
Location Magnolia, Arkansas, United States
Campus Coeducational; Residential
1,418 acres (574 ha)
Colors Royal Blue and Old Gold
         
Nickname Muleriders
Mascot The Mulerider, a student recipient of the Mulerider Scholarship charged with the responsibility of riding the school's official mule, Molly Ann, at events.
Affiliations Great American Conference
Website www.saumag.edu
Southern Arkansas University (logo).png

Southern Arkansas University (SAU) (formerly known as Southern State College, Magnolia A&M, and Third District Agricultural School) is a public four-year institution located in Magnolia, Arkansas, in Columbia County, Arkansas, situated less than 20 miles north of the Louisiana state line.

Maintaining a 17-1 student to instructor ratio,[2] and boasting a family-like atmosphere,[3] Southern Arkansas University offers programs that are unique for the region, including Game and Animation Design with a computer science concentration, or an arts and design focus.[4] The University also provides an engineering program, the only of its kind in the southern half of the state.[5]

In 2002, the University began a major capital campaign, the “Blue and Gold Vision,” to upgrade academic and athletic facilities across the campus.[6] The Blue and Gold Vision aims to raise $102.2 million for improvements to the University through a mix of public and private financing. Through the Blue and Gold Vision several new facilities have been built, including: the Donald W. Reynolds Campus & Community Center,[7] Band Building,[8] Mulerider Stables,[9] University Village,[10] Harton Theatre,[11] Fincher Hall,[12] and the Story Rodeo Arena.[13]

History[edit]

Southern Arkansas University's Overstreet Hall.jpg

Southern Arkansas University was established by an Act of the Arkansas Legislature in 1909 as a district agricultural high school for southwest Arkansas and was originally named Third District Agricultural School, often called by students and faculty "TDAS."[14] Its first term began in January 1911, with its curriculum including only subjects at the secondary school level.[15] In 1925, the State Legislature authorized the school to add two years of college work and to change its name to Agricultural and Mechanical College, Third District (Magnolia A&M).[16] The school continued to offer both high school and junior college courses until 1937, at which time the high school courses were discontinued.[17]

In the fall of 1949, the Board of Trustees, exercising authority vested in it by the State Legislature, decided to develop the college at a four-year, degree-granting institution. The Board authorized the addition of third-year college level courses to being with the fall semester of 1950.[18] Fourth-year courses were added in the fall semester of 1951.[19] By Act Eleven (January 24, 1951), the State Legislature changed the name of the institution to Southern State College.[20] In 1975, the institution was approved and accredited to offer a Master of Education Degree in selected areas.[21] Following approval of the Board of Trustees, the name of the institution was changed to Southern Arkansas University by the Board of Higher Education on July 9, 1976, in accordance with Act 343 of the General Assembly of 1975.[22]

Also in 1975, Southwest Technical Institute in Camden, Arkansas, joined the SAU system as Southern Arkansas University Tech.[23]

University Housing[edit]

Residence Halls[edit]

Bussey Hall and other residences, Southern Arkansas University.jpg

The university operates eight residence halls:[24][25]

Fincher Hall is the site of the Residential College, a special program for freshmen which builds community and contact with faculty.[26]

Honors Hall is the site of the Leadership College, a living and learning option for freshman and sophomore students focusing on students’ academic and personal success.[27]

On-Campus Apartments[edit]

Academics[edit]

Undergraduate[edit]

Southern Arkansas University offers 70 different undergraduate options, including pre-professional tracks, and 2+2 degree completion programs in four different academic colleges.[29]

College of Business[edit]

College of Education[edit]

College of Liberal and Performing Arts[edit]

College of Science and Techhnology[edit]

Graduate[edit]

Southern Arkansas University also offers 19 graduate programs, which are offered either face-to-face, online, or as a hybrid combination of the two.[30]

Athletics[edit]

Muleriders football game.jpg
Athletics logo

Southern Arkansas University is in the NCAA Division II as a member of the Great American Conference.[31]

The university's athletic nicknames are Muleriders and Lady Muleriders. The Muleriders take their name from the legend that the football team in the early 1900s had to ride mules from the college's agricultural department to catch the nearest train 6 miles (9.7 km) north of the college in order to reach out-of-town football games.[32]

The Muleriders football team won the Gulf South Championship in 1997.[33]

In each of 1953 and 1954, the then Southern State College Mulerider tennis team went undefeated winning the Arkansas Intercollegiate Conference in both singles and doubles and was invited by the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics to represent their district in their National Tennis Championships in 1953.[34]

In 2006 and 2009, the Mulerider baseball team won the Gulf South Conference championship. In 2009 the Mulerider baseball team hosted the NCAA Division Two South Regional for the first time in school history.[35]

In 2007, the Mulerider coed cheerleading squad competed at the NCA National Competition. In 2008, the cheerleading squad went back to nationals and took 5th in their division.[36]

Traditions[edit]

Bed races[edit]

The annual Bed Races have been a unique tradition as a part of SAU’s Family Day festivities since November 7, 1981. Representatives from SAU’s residence halls build and race twin-sized “beds” with a mattress platform on top of four bicycle tires. Once constructed, the beds are decorated according to a theme decided annually by the residence’s Hall Councils. The bed must have one reclining student, protected by a football helmet, and four runners. Each team competes in a double elimination race, and the winners take home the coveted Bed Race Trophy.[37]

Celebration of Lights[edit]

The Celebration of Lights has been a Christmas tradition at SAU since 1984. What once started as a single display to celebrate the 75th anniversary of the school has become an annual part of the holidays in Magnolia. During the celebration, a large Christmas tree is lit in front of Overstreet, as well as light displays all over campus. Additional strands of lights are strewn along the 187-foot SAU bell tower, transforming it into a giant Christmas candle. Included in the festivities each year are: the Magnolia City Christmas Parade, caroling, pictures with Santa Claus for the children, and a holiday buffet dinner for the community.[38]

Mulegating[edit]

“Mulegating” is a family-oriented event that gets Mulerider football fans geared up for every home SAU football game. Mulegating got its start in September, 2003, after the opening of the SAU Welcome Center. The SAU version of tailgating, students, family, and friends of SAU gather to visit, eat, and prepare for the upcoming game. The event is hosted by the University’s Office of Alumni Relations, and there is always a variety of grilled food, as well as games for the children.[39]

Alma mater[edit]

We hail thee now, oh SAU,
For thee we'll always stand,
Your eager sons and daughters
Form one united band.

Your glory and your fame will spread
Through all eternity,
We pledge to thee,
dear SAU,
Our Love and Loyalty.

Fight song[edit]

Fight song played by SAU's marching band

Problems playing this file? See media help.

We are the Blue and Gold,
'Riders, so strong and bold!
We've got the spirit --
Come on, let's hear it!
Shout out for good ol' SAU:
GO! GO! GO!

Go 'Riders, go along,
This is our favorite song!
For it's M-U-L-E-R-I-D-E-R
'Riders, the best of SAU!

Greek life[edit]

Sororities[edit]

National Panhellenic Conference Affiliates[edit]

National Pan-Hellenic Council Affiliates[edit]

Music[edit]

Fraternities[edit]

North-American Interfraternity Conference Affiliates[edit]

National Pan-Hellenic Council Affiliates[edit]

Other[edit]

Notable alumni[edit]

Pictures from Campus[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ As of June 30, 2009. "U.S. and Canadian Institutions Listed by Fiscal Year 2009 Endowment Market Value and Percentage Change in Endowment Market Value from FY 2008 to FY 2009" (PDF). 2009 NACUBO-Commonfund Study of Endowments. National Association of College and University Business Officers. Retrieved February 5, 2010. 
  2. ^ "Education Colleges". US News & World Report LP. Retrieved 11 March 2014. 
  3. ^ Street, Aaron. "SAU sets three enrollment records for fall 2013". Southern Arkansas University News. Retrieved 11 March 2014. 
  4. ^ "SAU offers new degree program". KTBS. Retrieved 11 March 2014. 
  5. ^ Mizell, Rusty. "SAU to offer degree program in engineering". ABC 7 KATV. Retrieved 11 March 2014. 
  6. ^ Willis, Dr. James (2009). The Mulerider School's Centennial History 1909-2009. United States of America: Xlibris Corporation. p. 355. ISBN 978-1-4415-5364-5. 
  7. ^ "Reynolds Center". Southern Arkansas University Foundation. Retrieved 11 March 2014. 
  8. ^ "Band Building". Southern Arkansas Foundation. Retrieved 11 March 2014. 
  9. ^ "Mulerider Stables". Southern Arkansas University Foundation. 
  10. ^ "University Village". Southern Arkansas University Foundation. Retrieved 11 March 2014. 
  11. ^ "Harton Theatre Facade". Southern Arkansas University Foundation. Retrieved 11 March 2014. 
  12. ^ "Fincher Hall". Southern Arkansas University. Retrieved 11 March 2014. 
  13. ^ "Mulerider Arena". Southern Arkansas University Foundation. Retrieved 11 March 2014. 
  14. ^ Willis, Dr. James (2009). The Mulerider School's Centennial History, 1909-2009. United States of America: Xlibris Corporation. pp. 27–33. ISBN 978-1-4415-5364-5. 
  15. ^ Willis, Dr. James (2009). The Mulerider School's Centennial History. United States of America: Xlibris Corporation. p. 35. ISBN 978-1-4415-5364-5. 
  16. ^ Willis, Dr. James (2009). The Mulerider School's Centennial History, 1909-2009. United States of America: Xlibris Corporation. p. 88. ISBN 978-1-4415-5364-5. 
  17. ^ Willis, Dr. James (2009). The Mulerider School's Centennial History, 1909-2009. United States of America: Xlibris Corporation. p. 108. ISBN 978-1-4415-5364-5. 
  18. ^ Willis, Dr. James (2009). The Mulerider School's Centennial History, 1909-2009. United States of America: Xlibris Corporation. pp. 188–190. ISBN 978-1-4415-5364-5. 
  19. ^ Willis, Dr. James (2009). The Mulerider School's Centennial History, 1909-2009. United States of America: Xlibris Corporation. p. 190. ISBN 978-1-4415-5364-5. 
  20. ^ Willis, Dr. James (2009). The Mulerider School's Centennial History, 1909-2009. United States of America: Xlibris Corporation. p. 195. ISBN 978-1-4415-5364-5. 
  21. ^ Willis, Dr. James (2009). The Mulerider School's Centennial History, 1909-2009. United States of America: Xlibris Corporation. p. 268. ISBN 978-1-4415-5364-5. 
  22. ^ Willis, Dr. James (2009). The Mulerider School's Centennial History, 1909-2009. United States of America: Xlibris Corporation. p. 289. ISBN 978-1-4415-5364-5. 
  23. ^ Coker, Kim. "Southern Arkansas University Tech". The Encyclopedia of Arkansas History and Culture. The Central Arkansas Library System. Retrieved 12 March 2014. 
  24. ^ "Residence Halls". Southern Arkansas University. Retrieved 12 March 2014. 
  25. ^ "The University Hall Learning Community". Southern Arkansas University. Retrieved 12 March 2014. 
  26. ^ "Residential College". Southern Arkansas University. Retrieved 12 March 2014. 
  27. ^ "Honors Hall". Southern Arkansas University. Retrieved 12 March 2014. 
  28. ^ "University Village". Southern Arkansas University. Retrieved 12 March 2014. 
  29. ^ "Southern Arkansas University Magnolia Undergraduate Catalog 2013-2014". Southern Arkansas University. Retrieved 13 March 2014. 
  30. ^ "Programs". Southern Arkansas University. Retrieved 13 March 2014. 
  31. ^ "Great American Conference Member Institutions". Great American Conference. Retrieved 13 March 2014. 
  32. ^ Willis, Dr. James (2009). The Mulerider School's Centennial History, 1909-2009. United States of America: Xlibris Corporation. pp. 13–17. ISBN 978-1-4415-5364-5. 
  33. ^ "Important Dates in SAU History". Southern Arkansas University. Retrieved 13 March 2014. 
  34. ^ Willis, Dr. James (2009). The Mulerider School's Centennial History, 1909-2009. United States: Xlibris Corporation. p. 229. ISBN 978-1-4415-5364-5. 
  35. ^ "Important Dates in SAU History". Southern Arkansas University. Retrieved 13 March 2014. 
  36. ^ "Gooooooo... cheerleaders!". The SAU Stater. Southern Arkansas University. Retrieved 10 April 2014. 
  37. ^ Willis, Dr. James (2009). The Mulerider School's Centennial History, 1909-2009. United States: Xlibris Corporation. p. 312. ISBN 978-1-4415-5364-5. 
  38. ^ Willis, Dr. James (2009). The Mulerider School's Centennial History, 1909-2009. United States: Xlibris Corporation. p. 312. ISBN 978-1-4415-5364-5. 
  39. ^ Willis, Dr. James (2009). The Mulerider School's Centennial History, 1909-2009. United States: Xlibris Corporation. pp. 356–357. ISBN 978-1-4415-5364-5. 
  40. ^ "Jordan Babineaux". databaseFootball.com. Retrieved February 25, 2013. 
  41. ^ "Bruce Bennett (1917–1979)". Encyclopedia of Arkansas. Retrieved February 25, 2013. 
  42. ^ "Biography of The Honorable Joyce Elliott Arkansas State Senator". Arkansas State Legislature. Retrieved 17 April 2014. 
  43. ^ "Raiders name Steve Forbes as their new men's basketball coach". Raiders Athletics. Retrieved February 25, 2013. 
  44. ^ "Daniel G Kyle". Our Campaigns. Retrieved February 25, 2013. 
  45. ^ "Tracy Lee Lawrence (1968–)". Encyclopedia of Arkansas. Retrieved February 25, 2013. 
  46. ^ "In Loving Memory of Lynn Lowe". Republican Party of Arkanasas. Retrieved February 25, 2013. 
  47. ^ "Fred Perry". NFL Enterprises LLC. Retrieved February 25, 2013. 
  48. ^ "Ron Simmons' Biography". votesmart.com. Retrieved March 15, 2014. 
  49. ^ Billy Hathorn "Otto Passman, Jerry Huckaby, and Frank Spooner: The Louisiana Fifth Congressional District Election of 1976", Louisiana History: The Journal of the Louisiana Historical Association, LIV No. 3 (Summer 2013), p. 346
  50. ^ "Tommy Tuberville, University of Cincinnati". AFCA. Retrieved February 25, 2013. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 33°17′30″N 93°14′09″W / 33.291579°N 93.235946°W / 33.291579; -93.235946