Southern Conference

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Southern Conference
(SoCon)
Southern Conference logo
Established 1921
Association NCAA
Division Division I FCS
Members 11
Sports fielded 20 (men's: 11; women's: 9)
Region Southeast
Headquarters Spartanburg, South Carolina
Commissioner John Iamarino (since 2006)
Website soconsports.com
Locations
Southern Conference locations

The Southern Conference (SoCon) is a collegiate athletic conference affiliated with the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I. Southern Conference football teams compete in the Football Championship Subdivision (formerly known as Division I-AA). Member institutions are located in the states of Alabama, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia. The Southern Conference ranks as the fourth oldest major college athletic conference in the United States.[1] Only the Big Ten (1896), Missouri Valley (1907), and Southwestern Athletic (1920) conferences are older. The SoCon was the first conference to utilize the three-point field goal in basketball in a November 29, 1980 game at Western Carolina against Middle Tennessee State University (MTSU), where Ronnie Carr shot the historic shot from 22 feet (6.7 m) away and the Catamounts won 77-70.[2][3]

The Southern Conference is considered one of the stronger football conferences in the Football Championship Subdivision and is considered a mid-major conference in basketball. It has also garnered considerable national attention from its recent success in these sports: in particular, three-time Division I NCAA Football champion Appalachian State Mountaineers, who stunned the fifth-ranked Michigan Wolverines 34–32 on September 1, 2007;[4] from the Davidson Wildcats, who reached the Elite Eight in the 2008 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament by upsetting power programs Gonzaga (a mid-major school which became a power program in the 2000s), Georgetown, and Wisconsin.[5] More recently, the six-time Division I NCAA Football champion Georgia Southern Eagles stunned Southeastern Conference power-house Florida Gators 26-20 in The Swamp on November 23, 2013. It was the first loss to a lower division opponent in the program's history. [6] The SoCon also frequently sees multiple teams selected to participate in the NCAA Division I Baseball Championship.[7]

History[edit]

Conference Commissioners
Wallace Wade 1951–1960
Lloyd Jordon 1960–1973
Ken Germann 1974–1986
Dave Hart 1986–1991
Wright Waters 1991–1998
Alfred B. White 1998–2001
Danny Morrison 2001–2005
John Iamarino 2006–present

The conference was formed on February 25, 1921 in Atlanta as fourteen member institutions split from the Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association.[1] Southern Conference charter members were Alabama, Auburn, Clemson, Georgia, Georgia Tech, Kentucky, Maryland, Mississippi State, North Carolina, North Carolina State, Tennessee, Virginia, Virginia Tech, and Washington & Lee. In 1922, six more universities - Florida, LSU, Mississippi, South Carolina, Tulane, and Vanderbilt joined the conference. Later additions included Sewanee (1923), Virginia Military Institute (1924), and Duke (1929).

The SoCon is particularly notable for having spawned two other major conferences. In 1932, the 13 schools located south and west of the Appalachians (Alabama, Auburn, Florida, Georgia, Georgia Tech, Kentucky, LSU, Mississippi, Mississippi State, University of the South, Tennessee, Tulane, and Vanderbilt) all departed the SoCon to form the Southeastern Conference (SEC). In 1953, seven additional schools (Clemson, Duke, Maryland, North Carolina, North Carolina State, South Carolina, and Wake Forest) withdrew from the SoCon to form the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC).[1] The SEC and ACC have gone on to surpass their parent conference in prestige; while the SEC and ACC are considered "power" conferences in Division I FBS (formerly Division I-A), the SoCon dropped to Division I-AA (FCS) in 1982, four years after the top division was split into two levels in 1978.

Location of Southern Conference member institutions, as of the 2013-14 academic year.

Other former members include the following:

The SoCon became the first league to hold a post-season basketball tournament to decide a conference champion in 1922. It was held at the Municipal Auditorium in Atlanta where North Carolina defeated Mercer 40-25.[8] The SoCon Basketball Tournament continues as the nation's oldest conference tournament. The next-oldest tournament overall is the SEC Men's Basketball Tournament, founded in 1933, but that event was suspended after its 1952 edition and did not resume until 1979. With the demise of the Division II West Virginia Intercollegiate Athletic Conference in 2013, whose tournament had been continuously held since 1936, the next-oldest conference tournament in continuous existence is now the ACC Men's Basketball Tournament, first held in 1954.

Member schools[edit]

Current members[edit]

The all-sports membership changed to 10 schools in 2014 following the departure of Appalachian State, Davidson, Elon, and Georgia Southern, plus the arrival of East Tennessee State (ETSU), Mercer, and VMI. The current football membership stands at eight; neither ETSU nor UNC Greensboro sponsors football. ETSU will relaunch its dormant football program in the SoCon in 2015.[9]

Institution Location
(Population)
Founded Type Enrollment U.S. News
Ranking [10]
Endowment [10] Joined Nickname
University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Chattanooga, Tennessee
(167,674)
1886 Public (UT) 11,438 (Fall 2011)[11] 49
(Regional: South)
$87,846,993 1976 Mocs (men's)
Lady Mocs (women's)
The Citadel Charleston, South Carolina
(124,632)
1842 Public (Military College) 3,390 (Fall 2011)[12] 4
(Regional: South)
$200,495,082 1936 Bulldogs
East Tennessee State University Johnson City, Tennessee
(63,152)
1911 Public (TBR) 15,530 Not Published
(National)
$100,111,731 2014[a 1] Buccaneers
Furman University Greenville, South Carolina
(61,674)
1826 Private 3,121 (Fall 2011)[13] 52
(National Lib. Arts)
$550,265,503 1936 Paladins
Mercer University Macon, Georgia
(155,547)
1833 Private 8,300 8
(Regional: South)
$191,665,145 2014 Bears
Samford University Homewood, Alabama
(25,167)
1841 Private (Alabama Baptist Convention) 4,758 (Fall 2011)[14] 3
(Regional: South)
$289,110,511 2008 Bulldogs
University of North Carolina at Greensboro Greensboro, North Carolina
(269,660)
1891 Public (UNC) 18,478 (Fall 2010)[15] 190
(National)
$192,532,176 1997 Spartans
Virginia Military Institute Lexington, Virginia
(7,042)
1839 Public (Military College) 1,569 65
(National Lib. Arts)
$308,958,261 2014[a 2] Keydets
Western Carolina University Cullowhee, North Carolina
(9,428)
1889 Public (UNC) 11,379 (Fall 2010)[16] 39
(Regional: South)
$49,644,743 1976 Catamounts
Wofford College Spartanburg, South Carolina
(37,013)
1854 Private (United Methodist Church) 1,495 (Fall 2010)[17] 65
(National Lib. Arts)
$154,162,683 1997 Terriers
  1. ^ ETSU had previously been a SoCon member from 1978 to 2005.[9]
  2. ^ VMI had previously been a SoCon member from 1924 to 2003.[9]

Associate members[edit]

On January 9, 2014, the SoCon and Atlantic Sun Conference announced a new alliance in lacrosse that took effect with the 2014–15 school year (2015 lacrosse season). Under its terms, sponsorship of men's lacrosse shifted from the A-Sun to the SoCon, while women's lacrosse sponsorship remained with the A-Sun. Bellarmine, which had announced it would join the A-Sun for men's lacrosse for the 2015 season, instead joined the SoCon.[18]

Institution Location Founded Type Enrollment Nickname Primary Conference SoCon Sport
Appalachian State University Boone, North Carolina 1899 Public (UNC) 17,344 (Fall 2011)[19] Mountaineers Sun Belt wrestling
Bellarmine University[18] Louisville, Kentucky 1950 Private (Catholic Church) 3,422 Knights GLVC
(NCAA Division II)
men's lacrosse
Campbell University[20] Buies Creek, North Carolina 1887 Private (Baptist State Convention of North Carolina) 10,487 Fighting Camels Big South wrestling
Davidson College Davidson, North Carolina 1837 Private (Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)) 1,756 (Fall 2011)[21] Wildcats Atlantic 10 wrestling
Gardner-Webb University[20] Boiling Springs, North Carolina 1905 Private (Baptist State Convention of North Carolina) 4,300 Runnin' Bulldogs Big South wrestling
High Point University[18] High Point, North Carolina 1924 Private (United Methodist Church) 3,603 Panthers Big South men's lacrosse
Jacksonville University[18] Jacksonville, Florida 1934 Private 3,400 Dolphins Atlantic Sun (A-Sun) men's lacrosse
University of Richmond[18] Richmond, Virginia 1830 Private 4,249 Spiders Atlantic 10 (A-10) men's lacrosse
Southern Illinois University Edwardsville[22] Edwardsville, Illinois 1957 Public (SIU) 14,055[23] Cougars OVC wrestling

Former members[edit]

Membership timeline[edit]

Mercer University Samford University Colonial Athletic Association Elon University Colonial Athletic Association College of Charleston Wofford College University of North Carolina at Greensboro Sun Belt Conference Georgia Southern University Atlantic Sun Conference East Tennessee State University Western Carolina University University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Conference USA Mid-American Conference Marshall University Sun Belt Conference Appalachian State University American Athletic Conference Conference USA Colonial Athletic Association East Carolina University Big 12 Conference Big East Conference (1979-2013) Atlantic 10 Conference West Virginia University Furman University Atlantic-10 Conference Davidson College The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina Colonial Athletic Association Eastern College Athletic Conference College of William & Mary Atlantic 10 Conference Colonial Athletic Association Eastern College Athletic Conference University of Richmond Atlantic 10 Conference George Washington University Atlantic Coast Conference Wake Forest University Atlantic Coast Conference Duke University Big South Conference Virginia Military Institute Southern Athletic Association Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference Southeastern Conference Sewanee: The University of the South Big Ten Conference Atlantic Coast Conference University of Maryland, College Park Southeastern Conference Metro Conference Atlantic Coast Conference University of South Carolina Southeastern Conference Vanderbilt University American Athletic Conference Conference USA Metro Conference Southeastern Conference Tulane University Southeastern Conference University of Mississippi Southeastern Conference Louisiana State University Southeastern Conference University of Florida Atlantic Coast Conference Big East Conference (1979-2013) Atlantic 10 Conference Metro Conference Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Old Dominion Athletic Conference Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference Washington and Lee University Atlantic Coast Conference North Carolina State University Atlantic Coast Conference University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Atlantic Coast Conference Clemson University Atlantic Coast Conference University of Virginia Southeastern Conference University of Tennessee Southeastern Conference Mississippi State University Southeastern Conference University of Kentucky Atlantic Coast Conference Metro Conference Southeastern Conference Georgia Institute of Technology Southeastern Conference University of Georgia Southeastern Conference Auburn University Southeastern Conference University of Alabama

Full members Full members (except football) Other Conference Other Conference

  • Due to space limitations, one portion of Washington and Lee's affiliation history is not indicated in the table. In 1958, W&L stopped awarding athletic scholarships; from then until 1962, it was an independent in what was then the NCAA College Division (which was split in 1973 to form today's Divisions II and III).

Sports[edit]

The Southern Conference sponsors championship competition in eleven men's and nine women's NCAA sanctioned sports.[24] Five schools are associate members for wrestling. Under a cooperative agreement with the Atlantic Sun Conference, the SoCon will begin sponsoring men's lacrosse in the 2014–15 school year (2015 season) with three full members (Furman, Mercer, VMI) and four associates (Bellarmine, High Point, Jacksonville, Richmond); women's lacrosse will be sponsored by the A-Sun.[18]

Teams in Southern Conference competition
Sport Men's Women's
Baseball
9
-
Basketball
10
8
Cross Country
10
10
Football
8
-
Golf
8
9
Lacrosse
7
-
Soccer
6
10
Softball
-
7
Tennis
8
8
Track and Field (Indoor)
9
10
Track and Field (Outdoor)
9
10
Volleyball
-
9
Wrestling
8
-

Men's sponsored sports by school[edit]

School Baseball Basketball Cross Country Football Golf Lacrosse Soccer Tennis Track & Field
(Indoor)
Track & Field
(Outdoor)
Wrestling Total SoCon Sports
Chattanooga
Red XN
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Red XN
Red XN
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
8
The Citadel
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Red XN
Red XN
Red XN
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
8
East Tennessee State
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Red XN
Green tickY
Red XN
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Red XN
8
Furman
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Red XN
10
Mercer
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Red XN
Red XN
Red XN
8
Samford
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Red XN
Red XN
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Red XN
8
UNC Greensboro
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Red XN
Green tickY
Red XN
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Red XN
8
VMI
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Red XN
Green tickY
Green tickY
Red XN
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
9
Western Carolina
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Red XN
Red XN
Red XN
Green tickY
Green tickY
Red XN
7
Wofford
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Red XN
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Red XN
9
Totals
9
10
10
8
10
3+4*
6
8
9
9
3+5#
94

Notes:

  • * = Lacrosse associate members Bellarmine, High Point, Jacksonville, and Richmond.
  • # = Wrestling associate members Appalachian State, Campbell, Davidson, Gardner-Webb, and SIU Edwardsville.
  • = East Tennessee State will relaunch its dormant football program in the SoCon in 2015.

Men's varsity sports not sponsored by the Southern Conference which are played by SoCon schools:

School Rifle1
The Citadel Independent
VMI Mid-Atlantic Rifle
Wofford Independent

Notes:

1: Rifle is technically a men's sport, but men's, women's, and coed teams all compete against each other. The Citadel fields men's and women's teams; VMI hosts men's, women's, and coed teams; and Wofford fields a single coed team.

Women's sponsored sports by school[edit]

School Basketball Cross Country Golf Soccer Softball Tennis Track & Field
(Indoor)
Track & Field
(Outdoor)
Volleyball Total SoCon Sports
Chattanooga
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
9
The Citadel
Red XN
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Red XN
Red XN
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
6
East Tennessee State
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
9
Furman
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
9
Mercer
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
9
Samford
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
9
UNC Greensboro
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
9
VMI
Red XN
Green tickY
Red XN
Green tickY
Red XN
Red XN
Green tickY
Green tickY
Red XN
4
Western Carolina
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
9
Wofford
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Red XN
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
8
Totals
8
10
9
10
7
8
9
9
10
80

Women's varsity sports not sponsored by the Southern Conference which are played by SoCon schools:

School Lacrosse Rifle1
The Citadel No Independent
Furman A-Sun No
VMI No Mid-Atlantic Rifle
Wofford No Independent

Notes:

1: Rifle is technically a men's sport, but men's, women's, and coed teams all compete against each other. The Citadel fields men's and women's teams; VMI fields all three types of teams; and Wofford fields a single coed team.

Facilities[edit]

School Football stadium Capacity Basketball arena Capacity Baseball stadium Capacity
Chattanooga Finley Stadium 20,668 McKenzie Arena 10,928 Non-baseball school
The Citadel Johnson Hagood Stadium 21,000 McAlister Field House 6,000 Joseph P. Riley, Jr. Park 6,000
East Tennessee State To be determined Freedom Hall Civic Center 6,000 Thomas Stadium 1,200
Furman Paladin Stadium 16,000 Timmons Arena 5,000 Latham Baseball Stadium 2,000
Mercer Moye Complex 10,200 Hawkins Arena 3,500 Claude Smith Field 500
Samford Seibert Stadium 6,700 Pete Hanna Center 4,974 Joe Lee Griffin Stadium 1,000
UNC Greensboro Non-football school Greensboro Coliseum (men's)
Fleming Gymnasium (women's)
7,617
2,320
UNCG Baseball Stadium 3,500
VMI Alumni Memorial Field 10,000 Cameron Hall 5,020 Gray–Minor Stadium 1,400
Western Carolina E. J. Whitmire Stadium 13,742 Ramsey Center 7,826 Hennon Stadium 1,500
Wofford Gibbs Stadium 13,000 Benjamin Johnson Arena 3,500 Russell C. King Field 2,500

Conference champions[edit]

Football[edit]

This is a partial list of the last 10 champions. For the full history, see List of Southern Conference football champions.

Year Champion Record
2004 Furman
Georgia Southern
6–1–0
2005 Appalachian State 6–1–0
2006 Appalachian State 7–0–0
2007 Wofford
Appalachian State+
5–2–0
2008 Appalachian State 8–0–0
2009 Appalachian State 8–0–0
2010 Appalachian State
Wofford+
7–1–0
2011 Georgia Southern 7–1–0
2012 Appalachian State
Georgia Southern
Wofford
6–2–0
2013 Chattanooga
Furman
Samford
6-2-0

+Denote loser of the head-to-head battle between co-champions.

Men's basketball[edit]

This is a partial list of the last 10 champions. For the full history, see List of Southern Conference men's basketball champions.

The Southern Conference split into a divisional format for basketball beginning with the 1994–95 season.

Year Regular Season Champion (North) Record Regular Season Champion (South) Record Tournament Champion
2004–05 Davidson 16–0 College of Charleston
Georgia Southern
10–6 Chattanooga
2005–06 Elon 13-5 Georgia Southern 11–4 Davidson
2006-07 Appalachian State 15–3 Davidson 17–1 Davidson
2007-08 Appalachian State
Chattanooga
13–7 Davidson 20–0 Davidson
2008-09 Chattanooga
Western Carolina
11–9 Davidson 18–2 Chattanooga
2009-10 Appalachian State 13–5 Wofford 15–3 Wofford
2010-11 Chattanooga
Western Carolina
12–6 College of Charleston
Wofford
14–4 Wofford
2011-12 UNC Greensboro 10–8 Davidson 16–2 Davidson
2012-13 Elon 10–8 Davidson 17–1 Davidson

However, the divisional format was abandoned beginning with the 2013–14 season.

Year Regular Season Champion Record Tournament Champion
2013-14 Davidson 15–1 Wofford

Women's basketball[edit]

This is a partial list of the last 10 tournament champions. For the full history, see Southern Conference Women's Basketball Tournament

Year Champion
2005 Western Carolina
2006 Chattanooga
2007 Chattanooga
2008 Chattanooga
2009 Western Carolina
2010 Chattanooga
2011 Samford
2012 Samford
2013 Chattanooga
2014 Chattanooga

Baseball[edit]

This is a partial list of the last 10 champions. For the full history, see Southern Conference Baseball Tournament.

Year Reg. Season Champion Tournament Champion
2004 College of Charleston The Citadel
2005 College of Charleston Furman
2006 Elon College of Charleston
2007 College of Charleston
Western Carolina
Wofford
2008 Elon Elon
2009 Elon Georgia Southern
2010 The Citadel The Citadel
2011 Elon Georgia Southern
2012 Appalachian State
College of Charleston
Samford
2013 Western Carolina Elon
2014 Western Carolina Georgia Southern

All-Southern football teams[edit]

For before 1922, see All-Southern.

Bold = consensus selection

* = consensus All-American

1922[edit]

Key:

C = Composite All-Southern compiled from twenty four coaches and sporting editors of the South.[25]

BE = Billy Evans's Southern Honor Roll.[26]

Ends

Tackles

Guards

  • Oscar Davis, Georgia Tech (C, BE)
  • Puss Whelchel, Georgia (C, BE)
  • Rip Reagan, Auburn (BE)
  • L. O. Wesley, Alabama (BE)
  • Birkett Pribble, Kentucky (BE)
  • Tuck Kelly, Vanderbilt (BE)

Centers

Quarterbacks

  • Herb "Flash" Covington, Centre (C, BE)
  • Doc Kuhn, Vanderbilt (BE)
  • Richard Mulvehill, Georgia (BE)
  • Jack McDonough, Georgia Tech (BE)
  • Charles Bartlett, Alabama (BE)

Halfbacks

Fullbacks

  • John Fletcher, Georgia (C, BE)
  • Roe Campbell, Tennessee (BE)
  • Ed Shirling, Auburn (BE)
  • Alexander Hunt, Georgia Tech (BE)

1923[edit]

Key:

Numbers (1 - 32), refers to the number of votes received by a player during the polling for the composite All-Southern list put out by the Atlanta Journal. The composite eleven received gold medals.[27] Votes for multiple positions have been combined under the one which received the most.

Ends

  • Lynn Bomar*, Vanderbilt (College Football Hall of Fame) (23)
  • Hek Wakefield, Vanderbilt (19)
  • Al Clemens, Alabama (10)
  • Joe Staton, Georgia Tech, (9)

Tackles

Guards

Centers

  • Shorty Propst, Alabama (15)
  • Clair Frye, Georgia Tech (8)
  • Fats Lawrence, Auburn (6)

Quarterbacks

Halfbacks

Fullbacks

1924[edit]

Key:

C = Composite selections from the Atlanta Journal.[28]

C2 = A second composite selection. Both were drawn by writers from Birmingham, Atlanta, Louisville, Nashville, Memphis, Chattanooga, New Orleans, Montgomery, Shreveport, Knoxville, Jacksonville, Columbus, and Columbia.[29]

Ends

  • Hek Wakefield*, Vanderbilt (C, C2)
  • Ralph Thompson, Georgia (C, C2)

Tackles

  • Bob Rives, Vanderbilt (C, C2)
  • Jim Taylor, Georgia (C, C2)

Guards

  • Goldy Goldstein, Florida (C, C2)
  • Fats Lawrence, Auburn (C, C2-as center)
  • Ben Compton, Alabama (C2)

Centers

Quarterbacks

Halfbacks

Fullbacks

1925[edit]

Key:

Numbers (1 through 32) = number of votes received from a composite selection compiled by the Associated Press.[30]

Ends

  • J. G. Lowe, Tennessee (13)
  • Ralph Thompson, Georgia (10)
  • Thomas, Washington & Lee (9)

Tackles

Guards

Centers

  • Amos Kent, Sewanee (9)
  • Owen Poole, Georgia Tech (6)

Quarterbacks

Halfbacks

Fullbacks

1926[edit]

Numbers (1 through 41) = number of votes received from a composite selection compiled by the Associated Press.[31]

Ends

  • Hoyt Winslett, Alabama (37)
  • Herschel Caldwell, Alabama (13)
  • John Marshall, Georgia Tech (11)
  • Harry Gamble, Tulane (7)

Tackles

  • Curtis Luckey, Georgia (20)
  • John Barnhill, Tennessee (15)
  • Mack Tharpe, Georgia Tech (11)
  • Ox McKibbon, Vanderbilt (9)

Guards

  • Fred Pickhard, Alabama (25)
  • Charles Mackall, Virginia (15)
  • Claude Perry, Alabama (7)
  • Orin Helvey, Sewanee (6)

Centers

  • Gordon Holmes, Alabama (11)
  • Owen Poole, Georgia Tech (8)

Quarterbacks

Halfbacks

  • George Morton, Georgia (18)
  • Red Barnes, Alabama (17)
  • Carter Barron, Georgia Tech (9)
  • Myron Stevens, Maryland (6)

Fullbacks

1927[edit]

Key:

C = composite selected by six sporting editors: Blinky Horn of the Nashville Tennessean, Ralph McGill of the Nashville Banner, Zipp Newman of the Birmingham News, Bib Phillips of the Birmingham Age-Herald, Morgan Blake of the Atlanta Journal, and Ed Danforth of the Atlanta Georgian.[32]

CP = selected by football fans of the South through Central Press newspapers.[33]

WMA = selected by coaches Wallace Wade of Alabama,, Dan McGugin of Vanderbilt, and William Alexander of Georgia Tech, to contend for a roster spot on a team set to face an All-Pacific Coast squad in Los Angeles on Christmas Day.[34][35][36]

Fred Pickhard.

Ends

Tackles

  • Frederick Pickhard, Alabama (CP, WMA)
  • B. Winston Cardwell, Virginia (CP, WMA)
  • Frank Speer, Georgia Tech (C)
  • Dave McArthur, Tennessee (C)
  • Hood, Georgia Tech (WMA)
  • Warren, LSU (WMA)

Guards

Centers

  • Elvin Butcher, Tennessee (CP, WMA)
  • Peter Pund, Georgia Tech (College Football Hall of Fame) (C)
  • Vernon Sharpe, Vanderbilt (WMA)
  • Mondy, VMI (WMA)

Quarterbacks

  • Bill Spears, Vanderbilt (College Football Hall of Fame) (C, CP, WMA)
  • Johnny Menville, Tulane (WMA)

Halfbacks

Fullbacks

1928[edit]

AP = composite selection of more than one hundred sports writers and coaches compiled by Associated Press. It had a first and second team.[37]

Ends

  • Dale Van Sickel, Florida (College Football Hall of Fame) (AP-1)
  • Dick Abernathy, Vanderbilt (AP-1)
  • Frank Waddey, Georgia Tech (AP-2)
  • Jones, Georgia Tech (AP-2)

Tackles

  • Frank Speer, Georgia Tech (AP-1)
  • Jess Tinsley, LSU (AP-1)
  • Glenn Lautzenheiser, Georgia (AP-2)
  • Vance Maree, Georgia Tech (AP-2)

Guards

  • Fred Vaughan, North Carolina State (AP-1)
  • Drennon, Georgia Tech (AP-1)
  • Bull Brown, Vanderbilt (AP-2)
  • Ellis Hagler, Alabama (AP-2)

Centers

Quarterbacks

Halfbacks

  • Warner Mizell, Georgia Tech (AP-1)
  • Billy Banker, Tulane (College Football Hall of Fame) (AP-1)
  • Peak, Virginia Tech (AP-2)
  • Gene McEver, Tennessee (College Football Hall of Fame) (AP-2)

Fullbacks

  • Gerald Snyder, Maryland (AP-1)
  • Tony Holm, Alabama (AP-2)

1929[edit]

Key:

UP = selected by the United Press.[38]

WB = selected by William Braucher, sportswriter for the NEA Service. He had a first and second team.[39]

AP = selected by the Associated Press from more than 50 coaches and sports writers. It had a first and second team.[40]

CP = selected by football fans of the south through Central Press newspapers.[41]

Ends

  • Vernon "Catfish" Smith, Georgia (College Football Hall of Fame) (UP, WB-1, AP-1)
  • Dale Van Sickel, Florida (College Football Hall of Fame) (CP, AP-1)
  • Fritz Brandt, Tennessee (UP, WB-2)
  • Paul Hug, Tennessee (WB-1, AP-2)
  • Jerry Dalrymple, Tulane (College Football Hall of Fame) (WB-2, AP-2)
  • Wear Schoonover, Arkansas (College Football Hall of Fame) (CP)

Tackles

  • Fred Sington, Alabama (College Football Hall of Fame) (WB-1, CP, AP-1)
  • Dick Abernathy, Vanderbilt (WB-2, AP-1)
  • Bill Drury, Kentucky (WB-1)
  • Molton Smith, Alabama WB-2)
  • Gordon Brown, Texas (CP)

Guards

  • Jimmy Steele, Florida (UP, WB-2, CP, AP-2)
  • Ray Farris, North Carolina (UP, WB-1, AP-1)
  • Bull Brown, Vanderbilt (WB-1, AP-1)
  • Milton Leathers, Georgia (WB-2)
  • Barton Koch, Baylor (College Football Hall of Fame) (CP)
  • Maury Bodenger, Tulane (AP-2)

Centers

  • Lloyd Roberts, Tulane (UP, WB-1, AP-1)
  • Julian Bealle, South Carolina (WB-2, AP-2)
  • Noble Atkins, Texas Christian (CP)

Quarterbacks

Halfbacks

  • Gene McEver*, Tennessee (College Football Hall of Fame) (UP, WB-1, CP, AP-1)
  • Billy Banker, Tulane (College Football Hall of Fame) (UP, WB-1, CP, AP-1)
  • Buddy Hackman, Tennessee (WB-2)
  • Sam Buie, Duke (WB-2)
  • Jim Magner, North Carolina (AP-2)

Fullbacks

  • Tony Holm, Alabama (UP, WB-1, CP, AP-1)
  • Stumpy Thomason, Georgia Tech (WB-2, CP-as quarter, AP-2-as half)
  • Rainey Cawthon, Florida (AP-2)

1930[edit]

Key:

AP = compiled from southern coaches and sportswriters by the Associated Press. It had a first and second team.[42]

Ends

  • Jerry Dalrymple, Tulane (College Football Hall of Fame) (AP-1)
  • Vernon "Catfish" Smith, Georgia (College Football Hall of Fame) (AP-1)
  • Herbert Maffett, Georgia (AP-2)
  • Bill Schwartz, Vanderbilt (AP-2)

Tackles

  • Fred Sington*, Alabama (College Football Hall of Fame) (AP-1)
  • Vance Maree, Georgia Tech (AP-1)
  • Dale Waters, Florida (AP-2)
  • Foots Clement, Alabama (AP-2)

Guards

Centers

  • Lloyd Roberts, Tulane (AP-1)
  • Ned Lipscomb, North Carolina (AP-2)

Quarterbacks

  • Bobby Dodd, Tennessee (College Football Hall of Fame) (AP-1)
  • Austin Downes, Georgia (AP-2)

Halfbacks

  • John Henry Suther, Alabama (AP-1)
  • Buddy Hackman, Tennessee (AP-1)
  • Shipwreck Kelly, Kentucky (AP-2)
  • Donald Zimmerman, Tulane (AP-2)

Fullback

  • Jack Roberts, Georgia (AP-1)
  • John Lewis Cain, Alabama (College Football Hall of Fame) (AP-2)

1931[edit]

Key:

AP = selected by coaches and sports writers, compiled by the Associated Press. It had a first and second team.[43]

Ends

Tackles

  • Charles Leyendecker, Vanderbilt (AP-1)
  • Ray Saunders, Tennessee (AP-1)
  • Jay Dee Patton, Sewanee (AP-2)
  • Ralph Wright, Kentucky (AP-2)

Guards

  • Herman Hickman, Tennessee (AP-1)
  • John Scafide, Tulane (AP-1)
  • Ralph Maddox, Georgia (AP-2)
  • Milton Leathers, Georgia (AP-2)

Centers

  • Pete Gracey*, Vanderbilt (AP-1)
  • Winnie Lodrigues, Tulane (AP-2)

Quarterbacks

Halfbacks

Fullbacks

  • John Lewis Cain, Alabama (College Football Hall of Fame) (AP-1)
  • Nollie Felts, Tulane (AP-2)

1932[edit]

Key:

AP = selected by coaches and sports writers, compiled by the Associated Press. It had a first and second team.[44][45]

Ends

  • Dave Ariail, Auburn (AP-1)
  • Virgil Rayburn, Tennessee (AP-1)
  • Joe Rupert, Kentucky (AP-2)
  • Harry Rossiter, Duke (AP-2)

Tackles

  • Charles Leyendecker, Vanderbilt (AP-1)
  • Fred Crawford, Duke (College Football Hall of Fame) (AP-1)
  • Bill Grinus, Virginia Tech (AP-2)
  • Malcolm Aitken, Tennessee (AP-2)

Guards

  • Tom Hupke, Alabama (AP-1)
  • John Scafide, Tulane (AP-1)
  • Marion Talley, Vanderbilt (AP-2)
  • Eugene Hite, Virginia Tech (AP-2)

Centers

  • Pete Gracey*, Vanderbilt (AP-1)
  • Howard Neblett, Georgia Tech (AP-2)

Quarterbacks

  • Jimmy Hitchcock*, Auburn (College Football Hall of Fame) (AP-1)
  • Lowell Mason, Duke (AP-2)

Halfbacks

  • Don Zimmerman*, Tulane (AP-1)
  • Beattie Feathers, Tennessee (College Football Hall of Fame) (AP-1)
  • Clyde Roberts, Vanderbilt (AP-2)
  • Norman Mott, Georgia (AP-2)

Fullbacks

Commissioner's and Germann Cups[edit]

The Commissioner's and Germann Cups are awarded each year to the top men's and women's program in the conference.[46] The Commissioner's Cup was inaugurated in 1970. The Germann Cup, named for former Southern Conference Commissioner Ken Germann, was first awarded in 1987. The completion of the 2013-2014 athletics season saw Appalachian State winning its 33rd Commissioner's Cup and Furman its 13th Germann Cup.[47]

Commissioner's Cup[edit]

Year Champion
1969–70 East Carolina
William & Mary
1970–71 William & Mary
1971–72 William & Mary
1972–73 William & Mary
1973–74 East Carolina
1974–75 East Carolina
1975–76 William & Mary
1976–77 East Carolina
1977–78 Appalachian State
1978–79 Appalachian State
1979–80 Appalachian State
1980–81 Appalachian State
1981–82 Appalachian State
1982–83 East Tennessee State
1983–84 Appalachian State
1984–85 Appalachian State
1985–86 Appalachian State
1986–87 Appalachian State
1987–88 Appalachian State
1988–89 Appalachian State
1989–90 Appalachian State
1990–91 Furman
1991–92 Appalachian State
1992–93 Appalachian State
1993–94 Appalachian State
1994–95 Appalachian State
1995–96 Appalachian State
1996–97 Appalachian State
1997–98 Appalachian State
1998–99 Appalachian State
1999–00 Appalachian State
2000–01 Appalachian State
2001–02 Appalachian State
2002–03 Appalachian State
2003–04 Appalachian State
2004–05 Chattanooga
2005–06 Appalachian State
2006–07 Appalachian State
2007–08 Appalachian State
2008–09 Appalachian State
2009–10 Appalachian State
2010–11 Appalachian State
2011–12 Appalachian State
2013–14 Appalachian State

Germann Cup[edit]

Year Champion
1986–87 Appalachian State
1987–88 Appalachian State
1988–89 Appalachian State
1989–90 Appalachian State
1990–91 Appalachian State
1991–92 Appalachian State
1992–93 Furman
1993–94 Furman
1994–95 Furman
1995–96 Furman
1996–97 Furman
1997–98 Furman
1998–99 Furman
1999–00 Furman
2000–01 Furman
2001–02 Furman
2002–03 Furman
2003–04 Furman
2004–05 College of Charleston
2005–06 Appalachian State
2006–07 Appalachian State
2007–08 Chattanooga
2008–09 College of Charleston
2009–10 Samford
2010–11 Appalachian State
2011–12 College of Charleston
2012–13 Appalachian State
2013–14 Furman

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "The History of the Southern Conference". Southern Conference. 2008-06-30. 
  2. ^ [1]
  3. ^ [2]
  4. ^ Stewart Mandel (2007-09-01). "The Mother of All Upsets". CNNSI. 
  5. ^ Associated Press (2008-03-28). "Curry's sweet touch continues as Davidson eludes Wisconsin". ESPN. 
  6. ^ David Jones. "Florida falls to FCS opponent, won't be bowl eligible". Retrieved 2014-03-20. 
  7. ^ "Preseason Projected Field Of 64". BaseballAmerica.com. Retrieved 2012-03-20. 
  8. ^ [3]
  9. ^ a b c "SoCon Welcomes ETSU, Mercer and VMI" (Press release). Southern Conference. July 1, 2014. Retrieved July 2, 2014. 
  10. ^ a b Rankings
  11. ^ http://www.utc.edu/Administration/PlanningEvaluationAndInstitutionalResearch/documents/FACTSUMMARY2011.xlsx.pdf
  12. ^ http://www3.citadel.edu/instresearch/fall_11_profile.pdf
  13. ^ http://www2.furman.edu/admission/EngageFurman/QuickLinks/Pages/FurmanataGlance.aspx
  14. ^ http://www.samford.edu/news/newsarticle.aspx?id=21474838590
  15. ^ http://ire.uncg.edu/pages/factbook/2010-11/PDFs/history/2010Profile.PDF
  16. ^ http://www.wcu.edu/WebFiles/PDFs/12-month_Enrollment.pdf
  17. ^ http://www.wofford.edu/about/fastfacts/
  18. ^ a b c d e f "SoCon, A-Sun Partner to Enhance Lacrosse" (Press release). Southern Conference. January 9, 2014. Retrieved March 31, 2014. 
  19. ^ http://www1.appstate.edu/dept/irp/FB/11-12/SI/S8demographics.pdf
  20. ^ a b >Campbell, Gardner-Webb, and VMI compete in the Big South Conference for most sports.
  21. ^ http://www3.davidson.edu/cms/documents/OfficesServices/OfficeofthePresident/InstResearch/OFFPR_IR_FF1112_Fall_enrollment.pdf
  22. ^ SIU Edwardsville competes in the Missouri Valley Conference for men's soccer and the Ohio Valley Conference for all other sports.
  23. ^ http://www.siue.edu/factbook/pdf/FbCurrent.pdf
  24. ^ http://www.soconsports.com
  25. ^ "Georgia Tech Has Four on All-Southern Team". Miami Herald. December 13, 1922. 
  26. ^ "Evans' All-Southern Honor Roll". Miami District Daily News. December 10, 1922. 
  27. ^ "All Star Eleven To Be Awarded By Atlanta Paper". Times-Picayune. December 9, 1923. 
  28. ^ "Atlanta Journals Picks S. I. C. All Star Team". Times-Picayune. December 8, 1924. 
  29. ^ "Two All-Dixie Teams Ignore Virginia Players". Washington Post. December 2, 1924. 
  30. ^ "All Southern Grid Team Compiled By The Associated Press". Kingsport Times. November 30, 1925. 
  31. ^ "Alabama Places 4 Men On Newspaper All-Southern Team". The Kingsport Times. November 28, 1926. 
  32. ^ "All-Southern Is Picked By Sport Writers". The Miami News. December 11, 1927. 
  33. ^ "Southern Team". The Kingsport Times. November 12, 1927. 
  34. ^ "30 Stars Play On All-Southern Team". Appleton Post Crescent. November 29, 1927. 
  35. ^ "'Bama Star Is Captain Of Eleven". The Bismarck Tribune. December 22, 1927. 
  36. ^ "All-Southern Team Comes From 20 Stars". Gastonia Daily Gazette. December 1, 1927. 
  37. ^ "All Southern Selections". The Kingsport Times. December 7, 1928. 
  38. ^ "United Press Picks Southern". Salt Lake Tribune. November 30, 1929. 
  39. ^ "Dodd, Holm, M'Ever, Banker, South's Backfield". The Frederick Post. December 4, 1929. 
  40. ^ "Tulane, Alabama, Vandy, and Tennessee Win Two Positions On Honor Team". The Bee. December 4, 1929. 
  41. ^ "Southern Team". The Daily Courier. December 10, 1929. 
  42. ^ "All-Southern". San Antonio Express. December 4, 1930. 
  43. ^ Dillon Graham (December 2, 1931). "Three Tulane Stars Picked for All-Southern Team". Fitchburg Sentinel. 
  44. ^ "All-Southern 11 Is Picked". Ironwood Daily Globe. December 1, 1932. 
  45. ^ Dillon Graham (December 1, 1932). "Zimmerman, Hitchcock, and Gracey Lead Poll Among Sport Writers". The Evening Independent. 
  46. ^ "Southern Conference Commissioner’s & Germann Cups". Southern Conference. 2007-06-04. 
  47. ^ http://www.soconsports.com/ViewArticle.dbml?DB_OEM_ID=4000&ATCLID=264425

External links[edit]