Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association

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Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association
(SIAA)
Established 1894
Dissolved 1942
Association NCAA
Members 72 (total)
Region Southern United States
Locations
Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association locations

The Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association (SIAA) was one of the first collegiate athletic conferences in the United States. Twenty-seven of the current Division I FBS (formerly Division I-A) football programs were members of this conference at some point, as were at least 19 other schools. Every member of the current Southeastern Conference except Arkansas and Missouri, as well as six of the 15 current members of the Atlantic Coast Conference plus the University of Texas at Austin, now of the Big 12 Conference (and previously of the now defunct Southwest Conference), formerly held membership in the SIAA.

History[edit]

The SIAA was founded on December 21, 1894, by Dr. William Dudley, a chemistry professor at Vanderbilt.[1] The original members were Alabama, Auburn, Georgia, Georgia Tech, North Carolina, Sewanee, and Vanderbilt. Clemson, Cumberland, Kentucky, LSU, Mercer, Mississippi, Mississippi A&M (Mississippi State), Southwestern Presbyterian University, Tennessee, Texas, Tulane, and the University of Nashville joined the following year in 1895 as invited charter members.[2] The conference was originally formed for "the development and purification of college athletics throughout the South".[3] They crafted a constitution, created an Executive Committee, elected officers, and set rules for:[3]

  • annual conventions
  • officiating
  • limiting players to five years of eligibility
  • banning professional athletes
  • requiring athletes to attend the school they represent
  • banning instructors and professors from playing
  • suspensions of individuals and schools
  • expenses

The league did not, however, sponsor much in the way of championship competition for its member schools. It did hold an annual track and field competition for a trophy, and it also held some basketball tournaments over the years, but apparently some member schools did not compete in the tournament during some years, and sometimes non-member southern schools were even allowed to compete in it as well. In 1903, a single-game football playoff occurred, but it seems to have been coordinated more so by the two competing schools (Clemson and Cumberland) than the conference itself. Several other efforts over the years by individual schools (rather than by the SIAA) to hold a conference title game fell through. Most SIAA titles claimed by schools in various sports were actually more mythical in nature than officially sanctioned by the league. Indeed, some schools centrally-located in the conference played far more conference games than others on the periphery, making it difficult to form a fair comparison to determine just which team was truly the best, especially once the league began to constantly expand its membership.

In 1915, a disagreement arose within the conference regarding the eligibility of freshman athletes, the so-called "one-year rule." Generally, the larger universities opposed the eligibility of freshman players, while the smaller schools favored it. As a result, some of the large universities formed the Southern Intercollegiate Conference (now the Southern Conference), which used the one-year rule, while still maintaining membership within the SIAA.[4]

At the conference's annual meeting on December 10, 1920, the SIAA rejected proposals to ban freshman athletes and abolish paid summer baseball.[5] In protest, some schools that had voted in favor of the propositions immediately announced they would seek to form a new conference.[5] On February 25, 1921, Alabama, Auburn, Clemson, Georgia, Georgia Tech, Kentucky, Mississippi State, and Tennessee left the SIAA to form the Southern Conference, along with non-SIAA members Maryland, North Carolina, North Carolina State, Virginia, Virginia Tech, and Washington & Lee.[6] In 1922, the Southern Conference underwent an expansion and added six more members, all at the expense of the SIAA: Florida, Louisiana State, Mississippi, South Carolina, Tulane, and Vanderbilt.[4]

With the departure of most of the major colleges, the SIAA became a de facto small college conference in 1923. In the 1920s and 1930s, the SIAA increased its membership with the addition of many additional small universities. The conference eventually disbanded in 1942 with the onset of American involvement in World War II.[4] League archives were kept at Vanderbilt, the league's founding school, but the building housing the archives was eventually gutted with fire, taking countless irreplaceable items pertaining to the SIAA's history with it.

Membership[edit]

Original charter members are denoted in boldface. Invited charter members are denoted with an asterisk.[2]

Conference affiliations reflect those for the upcoming 2013–14 school year.

School City State Tenure Conference left for Current conference
Alabama Tuscaloosa Alabama 1894–1917, 1919–1922 Southern Conference Southeastern Conference
Auburn Auburn Alabama 1894–1914, 1916–1922 Southern Conference Southeastern Conference
Centenary Shreveport Louisiana 1925–1941 Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference (D-III)
Centre Danville Kentucky 1910–1941 Southern Athletic Association (D-III)
Chattanooga Chattanooga Tennessee 1914–1916, 1919–1932 Southern Conference
The Citadel Charleston South Carolina 1909–1935 Southern Conference Southern Conference
Clemson* Clemson South Carolina 1895–1922 Southern Conference Atlantic Coast Conference
Cumberland* Lebanon Tennessee 1895–1903 Mid-South Conference (NAIA)
Dahlonega (North Georgia) Dahlonega Georgia 1908–1909 Peach Belt Conference (D-II)
Davidson Davidson North Carolina 1898–1906 Atlantic 10 Conference
Delta State Cleveland Mississippi 1936–1941 Gulf South Conference (D-II)
Eastern Kentucky Richmond Kentucky 1930–1942 Ohio Valley Conference
Emory & Henry Emory Virginia 1936–1941 Old Dominion Athletic Conference (D-III)
Erskine Due West South Carolina 1923–1941 Conference Carolinas (D-II)
Florida Gainesville Florida 1910–1917, 1919–1922 Southern Conference Southeastern Conference
Furman Greenville South Carolina 1898–1899, 1906–1910, 1920–1929, 1932–1935 Southern Conference Southern Conference
Georgetown (Kentucky) Georgetown Kentucky 1915–1941 Mid-South Conference (NAIA)
Georgia Athens Georgia 1894–1914, 1916, 1919–1922 Southern Conference Southeastern Conference
Georgia Tech Atlanta Georgia 1894–1913, 1916–1922 Southern Conference Atlantic Coast Conference
Gordon Military College Barnesville Georgia 1906–1910 Georgia Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA)
Howard College (Samford) Homewood Alabama 1909–1912, 1914–1917, 1919–1931, 1933–1938 Southern Conference
Jacksonville State Jacksonville Alabama 1939–1940 Ohio Valley Conference
Kentucky* Lexington Kentucky 1895–1903, 1911–1922 Southern Conference Southeastern Conference
Kentucky Wesleyan Owensboro Kentucky 1925–1930 Great Midwest Athletic Conference (D-II)
Louisiana College Pineville Louisiana 1922–1941 American Southwest Conference (D-III)
Louisiana State* Baton Rouge Louisiana 1895–1917, 1919–1922 Southern Conference Southeastern Conference
Louisiana Tech Ruston Louisiana 1925–1942 Louisiana Intercollegiate Conference Conference USA
Louisville Louisville Kentucky 1914–1941 Atlantic Coast Conference
Loyola (New Orleans) New Orleans Louisiana 1925, 1930–1937 Southern States Athletic Conference (NAIA)
Memphis State (Memphis) Memphis Tennessee 1935–1942 Independent American Athletic Conference
Memphis University School Memphis Tennessee 1908–1910 Tennessee Secondary School Athletic Association (HS)
Mercer* Macon Georgia 1895–1937 Atlantic Sun Conference (Pioneer Football League for football; Southern Conference for all sports in 2014)
Miami (Florida) Coral Gables Florida 1929–1942 Independent Atlantic Coast Conference
Middle Tennessee Murfreesboro Tennessee 1931–1942 Conference USA
Millsaps Jackson Mississippi 1908–1909, 1913–1938 Southern Athletic Association (D-III)
Mississippi* Oxford Mississippi 1895–1912, 1914–1922 Southern Conference Southeastern Conference
Mississippi College Clinton Mississippi 1910–1917, 1919–1941 American Southwest Conference (D-III)
Mississippi A&M* (Mississippi State) Starkville Mississippi 1895–1922 Southern Conference Southeastern Conference
Morehead State Morehead Kentucky 1934–1942 Ohio Valley Conference
Murray State Murray Kentucky 1931–1942 Ohio Valley Conference
Nashville* Nashville Tennessee 1895–1908 University closed in 1909
Newberry Newberry South Carolina 1922–1942 South Atlantic Conference (D-II)
North Carolina Chapel Hill North Carolina 1894–1901 South Atlantic Intercollegiate Athletic Association Atlantic Coast Conference
Northwestern State Natchitoches Louisiana 1928–1941 Southland Conference
Oglethorpe Atlanta Georgia 1920–1925 Southern Athletic Association (D-III)
Presbyterian Clinton South Carolina 1921–1942 Big South Conference
Rollins Winter Park Florida 1925–1942 Sunshine State Conference (D-II)
University of the South (Sewanee) Sewanee Tennessee 1894–1924 Southern Conference Southern Athletic Association (D-III)
South Carolina Columbia South Carolina 1916–1922 Southern Conference Southeastern Conference
Southern (Florida) Lakeland Florida 1925–1930 Sunshine State Conference (D-II)
Southern Mississippi Hattiesburg Mississippi 1928–1941 Conference USA
Southern University (Birmingham-Southern) Birmingham Alabama 1901–1912 Southern Athletic Association (D-III)
Southwestern Presbyterian* (Rhodes) Memphis Tennessee 1895–1903 Southern Athletic Association (D-III)
Southwestern Louisiana (Louisiana–Lafayette) Lafayette Louisiana 1925–1942 Sun Belt Conference
Spring Hill Mobile Alabama 1927–1931 Southern States Athletic Conference (NAIA)
Stetson DeLand Florida 1925–1931, 1933–1940 Atlantic Sun Conference (Pioneer Football League for football)
Tampa Tampa Florida 1936–1942 Sunshine State Conference (D-II)
Tennessee* Knoxville Tennessee 1895–1916, 1919–1922 Southern Conference Southeastern Conference
Tennessee Tech Cookeville Tennessee 1933–1942 Ohio Valley Conference
Texas* Austin Texas 1895–1906 Independent Big 12 Conference
Texas A&M College Station Texas 1903–1908, 1913–1914 Southwest Conference Southeastern Conference
Transylvania Lexington Kentucky 1915–1924, 1926–1941 Heartland Collegiate Athletic Conference (D-III)
Trinity College (Duke) Durham North Carolina 1903–1912 Atlantic Coast Conference
Troy State (Troy) Troy Alabama 1936–1942 no team (WWII) Sun Belt Conference
Tulane* New Orleans Louisiana 1894–1906, 1911–1917, 1919–1922 Southern Conference Conference USA (American Athletic Conference in 2014)
Union (Kentucky) Barbourville Kentucky 1933–1941 Appalachian Athletic Conference (NAIA)
Union (Tennessee) Jackson Tennessee 1925–1942 Gulf South Conference (NCAA DII)
Vanderbilt Nashville Tennessee 1894–1924 Southern Conference Southeastern Conference
Virginia Tech Blacksburg Virginia 1898 Atlantic Coast Conference
Western Kentucky Bowling Green Kentucky 1921–1942 Sun Belt Conference (Conference USA in 2014)
Wofford Spartanburg South Carolina 1903–1942 Southern Conference

Timeline[edit]

Jacksonville State University Troy University University of Tampa Emory and Henry College Delta State University University of Memphis Morehead State University Union College (Kentucky) Tennessee Technological University Murray State University Middle Tennessee State University Eastern Kentucky University University of Miami University of Southern Mississippi Northwestern State University Spring Hill College Union University Stetson University University of Louisiana at Lafayette Florida Southern College Rollins College Loyola University New Orleans Louisiana Tech University Kentucky Wesleyan College Centenary College of Louisiana Louisiana College Presbyterian College Newberry College Erskine College Western Kentucky University Birmingham-Southern College Oglethorpe University Millsaps College Wofford College University of South Carolina Transylvania University Georgetown College (Kentucky) University of Louisville University of Tennessee at Chattanooga University of Florida Mississippi College Centre College Samford University The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina Memphis University School North Georgia College & State University Gordon College (Georgia) Texas Agricultural and Mechanical University Duke University Birmingham–Southern College Furman University Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Davidson College University of Tennessee Tulane University University of Texas at Austin Rhodes College University of Nashville University of Mississippi Mississippi State University Mercer University Louisiana State University University of Kentucky Cumberland University Clemson University Georgia Institute of Technology Vanderbilt University Sewanee: The University of the South University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Georgia Auburn University University of Alabama

All-Southern Football Teams[edit]

Major football programs in the south included members of the SIAA, the predecessor to today's Southeastern Conference, and the SAIAA, the predecessor to today's Atlantic Coast Conference. North Carolina was in both conferences at different points in its history, and Virginia Tech had one year in the SIAA.

Bold = consensus selection

* = consensus All-American.

1901[edit]

Key:

WP = selected by the Washington Post. It had a second team referred to as substitutes.[7]

WH = selected by W. H. Hoge.[7]

Ends

  • Ware, Virginia Tech (WP)
  • Errickson, Gallaudet (WP)
  • Hobson, Virginia (WP-s)
  • S. Edmoston, Georgetown (WP-s)

Tackles

  • Walker, Virginia (WP-s, WH-as fullback)
  • Drill, Georgetown (WP)
  • Benet, Virginia (WP)
  • McCormick, Virginia Tech (WP-s)

Guards

  • Johnson, VMI (WP)
  • A. Harris, Virginia (WP)
  • Lynch, Georgetown (WP-s)
  • Kerns, Georgetown (WP-s)

Centers

  • Given, Georgetown (WP)
  • Waters, Virginia (WP-s)

Quarterbacks

  • Tutwiler, Virginia (WP)
  • DeCamp, Virginia Tech (WP-s)

Halfbacks

  • Hart, Georgetown (WP)
  • Coleman, Virginia(WP)
  • Counselman, Virginia Tech (WP-s)
  • Simpkins, Sewanee (WP-s)

Fullbacks

  • Carpenter, Virginia Tech (WP)
  • Carr, North Carolina (WP)

1903[edit]

Key:

H = selected by John Heisman, coach at Clemson University.[8]

NY = selected by a prominent New Yorker hired for the purpose.[9]

JLD = selected by John Longer Desaulles. It had a first and second team.[10]

Ends

Tackles

  • Johnson, Virginia (NY, JLD)
  • Council, Virginia (NY, JLD)
  • Frank Foust, North Carolina (H)

Guards

Centers

  • Conner, Virginia (NY, JLD)
  • Smith, Cumberland (H)
  • Givens, Georgetown (JLD-2)

Quarterbacks

  • John Maxwell, Clemson (H, JLD-2)
  • Pollard, Virginia (NY, JLD)

Halfbacks

  • Reilly, Georgetown (NY, JLD)
  • Carpenter, VIrginia Tech (NY, JLD)
  • John J. Tigert, Vanderbilt (College Football Hall of Fame) (H)
  • Anderson, Cumberland (H)
  • Heald, Virginia (JLD-2)
  • Hart, Georgetown (JLD-2)

Fullbacks

  • Jock Hanvey, Clemson (H, NY)
  • Yancey, Kentucky (JLD-2)

1904[edit]

Key:

H = selected by John Heisman, coach at Georgia Institute of Technology. He had a first and second team.[11]

JLD = selected by John de Saulles.[12]

Ends

  • W. Wilson, Georgia Tech (H-1)
  • Jones C. Beene, Tennessee (H-1)
  • Owsley Manier, Vanderbilt (H-2)
  • Arthur Sullivan, Georgia (H-2)
  • Townsend, North Carolina (JLD)
  • Hart, Georgetown (JLD)

Tackles

  • Lob Brown, Georgia Tech (H-1)
  • O. L. Derrick, Clemson (H-1)
  • Irish Graham, Vanderbilt (H-2)
  • G. W. Streit, Auburn (H-2)
  • Council, Virginia (JLD)
  • Mahoney, Georgetown (JLD)

Guards

  • Henry Phillips, Sewanee (H-1, JLD)
  • Innis Brown, Vanderbilt (H-1)
  • Harvey Sartain, Alabama (H-2)
  • Braswell, Auburn (H-2)
  • Johnson, Virginia (JLD)

Centers

  • Stein Stone, Vanderbilt (H-1, JLD)
  • Smith, Cumberland (H-2)

Quarterbacks

  • John Scarbrough, Sewanee (H-1)
  • Frank Kyle, Vanderbilt (H-2)
  • Pollard, Virginia (JLD)

Halfbacks

  • Honus Craig, Vanderbilt (H-1, JLD)
  • Steele, Cumberland (H-1)
  • Humphrey Foy, Auburn (H-2)
  • Auxford Burks, Alabama (H-2)
  • Johnson, Virginia (JLD)

Fullbacks

  • Joe Holland, Clemson (H-1)
  • Ed Hamilton, Vanderbilt (H-2)
  • Hunter Carpenter, North Carolina (College Football Hall of Fame) (JLD)

1905[edit]

Key:

WRT = selected by W. Reynolds Tichenor of Auburn, published in the Atlanta Journal.[13] He had a first and second team.

BW = selected by Bradley Walker, celebrated southern official.[13] He had a first and second team.

HY = selected by coach Hyatt of University of the South.[13]

AL = selected by the coach of the University of Alabama.[13]

NE = selected by a "Nashville Expert."[13]

AJ = An attempt at a composite by the Journal, "players most favored by experts"[13]

JLD = selected by John Longer Desaulles.[14]

WMR = selected by professor W. M. Riggs of Clemson University.[15]

Ends

  • Bob Blake, Vanderbilt (WRT-1, BW-1, HY, AL, NE, AJ, JLD, WMR)
  • Ed Hamilton, Vanderbilt (WRT-1, BW-1, HY, AL, NE, AJ, JLD)
  • Sam Roberts, Georgia Tech (WRT-2, AJ)
  • W. Wilson, Georgia Tech (WRT-2)
  • Powell Lykes, Clemson (BW-2)
  • Craig Day, Georgia Tech (BW-2)

Tackles

  • Hillsman Taylor, Vanderbilt (WRT-1, BW-1, HY, NE, AJ, JLD, WMR)
  • Frank Jones, Auburn (WRT-1, BW-1, HY, AL-as guard, AJ, JLD)
  • Lex Stone, Sewanee (WRT-2, AJ)
  • Lob Brown, Georgia Tech (BW-2)
  • Joe Pritchard, Vanderbilt (BW-2, NE)

Guards

  • O. L. Derrick, Clemson (WRT-2, BW-1, AL-as tackle, AJ, JLD, WMR-as tackle)
  • T. S. Sims, Alabama (WRT-1, BW-1, HY, AL, AJ)
  • Stein Stone, Vanderbilt (WRT, BW-2, NE, JLD, WMR)
  • Innis Brown, Vanderbilt (WRT-2, BW-2, NE, WMR)
  • Parrish, Texas (HY)

Centers

  • Michael Curtis Patterson, Vanderbilt (WRT-2, BW-1, NE, AJ, JLD)
  • George Watkins, Sewanee (BW-2, HY, AL-as tackle, AJ)
  • Smith, Cumberland (WRT-1)
  • Wash Moody, Alabama (AL)
  • Keasler, Clemson (WMR)

Quarterbacks

  • John Scarbrough, Sewanee (WRT-1, BW-2, HY, AJ, WMR)
  • Frank Kyle, Vanderbilt (BW-1, AL, NE, AJ, JLD)
  • Stewart, Cumberland (WRT-2)

Halfbacks

  • Honus Craig, Vanderbilt (WRT-1, BW-1, HY, AL, NE, AJ, JLD, WMR)
  • Auxford Burks, Alabama (WRT-2, BW-2, HY, AL, AJ, WMR)
  • Fritz Furtick, Clemson (WRT-2, BW-1, AL-fullback, AJ, WMR-as end)
  • Dan Blake, Vanderbilt (WRT-1, BW-2, NE, AJ)
  • Clyde Johnson, Virginia (JLD)

Fullbacks

  • Owsley Manier, Vanderbilt (WRT-1, BW-1, HY, NE, AJ, JLD, WMR)
  • W. S. Brown, Georgia Tech (WRT-2)
  • Lewis Clark, Georgia Tech (BW-2)

1906[edit]

Key:

AWL = selected by A. W. Lynn, sporting editor for the Atlanta Constitution.[16]

WP = selected by The Washington Post.[17]

MT = selected by the Macon Telegraph[18]

MCA = selected by the Memphis Commercial Appeal.[19]

PW = selected by Percy Whiting of Illustrated Outdoor News.[20]

DM = selected by Dan McGugin head coach at Vanderbilt University, with information from Bradley Walker, southern official.[20]

Ends

  • Bob Blake, Vanderbilt (AWL, WP, MT, MCA, PW, DM)
  • Lob Brown, Georgia Tech (AWL, MT, PW)
  • Bagley, Washington & Lee (WP)
  • Frank Shipp, Sewanee (DM)

Tackles

  • Joe Pritchard, Vanderbilt (AWL, WP, MT, MCA, PW, DM)
  • Stone, Sewanee (MCA-as end, PW, DM)
  • Edwin Noel, Vanderbilt (AWL, MT)
  • R. S. Wilson, Mississippi A & M (WP)

Guards

  • Walker Chorn, Vanderbilt (AWL, MT, MCA, PW, DM)
  • Fatty McLain, Vanderbilt (AWL, MT)
  • George Watkins, Sewanee (WP)
  • Emory Hodgson, Georgetown (WP)
  • Elmer, Mississippi (MCA)
  • O. L. Derrick, Clemson (DM)

Centers

  • Stein Stone, Vanderbilt (AWL, WP, MCA-as tackle, PW, DM)
  • Ketron, Georgia (MT)
  • Conner, Mississippi A & M (MCA, PW-as guard)

Quarterbacks

  • Sam Costen, Vanderbilt (AWL, MT, MCA, PW, DM)
  • Oscar Randolph, Virginia (WP)

Halfbacks

  • Dan Blake, Vanderbilt (AWL, MT, MCA, PW, DM)
  • Honus Craig, Vanderbilt (MCA, PW, DM)
  • Clyde Johnson, Virginia (WP, MT)
  • Fritz Furtick, Clemson (AWL)
  • Speedy Kerr, Georgetown (WP)

Fullbacks

  • Owsley Manier, Vanderbilt (AWL, WP, MT, MCA)

1907[edit]

Key:

TP = selected by the Times-Picayune.[21]

NY = selected by "a well-known New York authority on sports;" as published by the Charlotte Observer.[22]

Ends

  • Bob Blake, Vanderbilt (TP, NY)
  • H. G. Lewis, Sewanee (TP)
  • H. Cabell Maddux, Virginia (NY)

Tackles

  • Lex Stone, Sewanee (TP, NY)
  • Frank Faulkinberry, Sewanee (TP)
  • Sadler, North Carolina A & M (NY)

Guards

  • Roscoe Word, Tennessee (TP)
  • Horace Sherill, Vanderbilt (TP)
  • Harwood Beebe, North Carolina A & M (NY)
  • Hodgson, Virginia Tech (NY)

Centers

Quarterbacks

  • Lawrence Markley, Sewanee (TP)
  • Sam Honaker, Virginia (NY)

Halfbacks

  • Honus Craig, Vanderbilt (TP, NY)
  • Frank Shipp, Sewanee (TP)
  • Sam Costen, Vanderbilt (NY)

Fullbacks

  • Aubrey Lanier, Sewanee (TP)
  • George Dutcher, Georgetown (NY)

1908[edit]

Key:

DM = selected by Dan McGugin, coach at Vanderbilt University.[23]

Ends

  • Vaughn Blake, Vanderbilt (DM)
  • Silas Williams, Sewanee (DM)

Tackles

  • J. W. Davis, Georgia Tech (DM)
  • Frank Faulkinberry, Sewanee (DM)

Guards

  • Louis Hasslock, Vanderbilt (DM)
  • Nathan Dougherty, Tennessee (College Football Hall of Fame) (DM)

Centers

  • Fatty McLain, Vanderbilt (DM)

Quarterbacks

  • Tom McClure, Auburn (DM)

Halfbacks

  • Walker Leach, Tennessee (DM)
  • Lew Hardage, Auburn (DM)

Fullbacks

  • Lawrence Markley, Sewanee (DM)

1910[edit]

Key:

GR = selected jointly by Grantland Rice and John Heisman in the Atlanta Constitution.[24]

DJ = selected by Dick Jemison, sporting editor for the Atlanta Constitution.[24]

C = composite of four sporting writers and three coaches.[25]

Ends

  • Jenks Gillem, Sewanee (GR, DJ, C)
  • Bill Neely, Vanderbilt, (GR, C)
  • Homer Cogdell, Auburn, (DJ)

Tackles

  • Ewing Y. Freeland, Vanderbilt (GR, DJ, C)
  • H. W. Patterson, Georgia Tech (GR, C)
  • Frank Faulkinberry, Sewanee (DJ)

Guards

Centers

  • E. L. Caton, Auburn (GR, DJ, C)

Quarterbacks

  • Chigger Browne, Sewanee (GR, DJ, C)

Halfbacks

  • Ray Morrison, Vanderbilt (College Football Hall of Fame) (GR, DJ, C)
  • Aubrey Lanier, Sewanee (DJ, C)
  • Bob McWhorter, Georgia (College Football Hall of Fame) (GR)

Fullbacks

  • Bradley "Bill" Streit, Auburn (GR, DJ, C)

1911[edit]

Key:

NS = selected by Nathan P. Stauffer of Collier's Weekly. He had a first and second team.[24][26]

BS = selected by Bill Streit, assistant coach at Auburn University. He had a first and second team.[27]

Ends

  • Jenks Gillem, Sewanee (NS-1, BS-2)
  • Bully Van de Graaff, Alabama, (NS-2, BS-1)
  • Byron Walton, Mississippi (NS-1)
  • C. P. Goree, Georgia Tech (NS-2)
  • Enoch Brown, Vanderbilt (BS-2)

Tackles

  • Ewing Y. Freeland, Vanderbilt (NS-1, BS-1)
  • Rube Barker, Mississippi (NS-1, BS-1)
  • Homer Cogdell, Auburn (NS-2, BS-1-as end)
  • Jim Stoney, Sewanee (NS-2)
  • B. J. Lamb, Auburn (BS-2)
  • Head Ellard, Mississippi A & M (BS-2)

Guards

  • Pete Bonner, Auburn (NS-1, BS-1)
  • W. E. "Frog" Metzger, Vanderbilt (NS-2, BS-1)
  • David Peacock, Georgia (NS-2, BS-2)
  • A. P. Mills, Mississippi A & M (NS-1)
  • J. P. Major, Auburn (BS-2)

Centers

  • Hugh Morgan, Vanderbilt (NS-1, BS-1)
  • John C. Adams, Mississippi (NS-2)
  • Grice, Mercer (BS-2)

Quarterbacks

  • Ray Morrison, Vanderbilt (College Football Hall of Fame) (NS-1, BS-1)
  • W. J. Williams, Mississippi A & M (NS-2)
  • Kid Woodruff, Georgia (BS-2)

Halfbacks

  • Lewie Hardage, Vanderbilt (NS-1, BS-1)
  • William C. Cahall, Mississippi (NS-2, BS-2)
  • Frank Shields, Mississippi (NS-1)
  • Ammie Sikes, Vanderbilt (NS-2)

Fullbacks

  • Bob McWhorter, Georgia (College Football Hall of Fame) (NS-1, BS-1-as half)
  • John Davis, Auburn (NS-2, BS-1)
  • H. W. Patterson, Georgia Tech (BS-2)

1912[edit]

Key:

IB = selected by Innis Brown, captain of 1905 Vanderbilt football team and referee throughout the South.[28]

NS = selected by Nathan P. Stauffer of Collier's Weekly.[29] It had a first and second team

SS = selected by Sam Sarokin, sporting editor for the New Orleans Item.[29]

Ends

  • Jenks Gillem, Sewanee (IB, NS, SS)
  • Enoch Brown, Vanderbilt (IB, NS-2)
  • Robbie Robinson, Auburn (NS)
  • Montgomery, Texas (NS)

Tackles

  • Rube Barker, Mississippi (IB, NS, SS)
  • Tom Brown, Vanderbilt (IB, NS)
  • Lamb, Auburn (NS-2, SS)
  • Bowler, Texas A & M (NS-2)

Guards

  • David Peacock, Georgia (IB, NS-2)
  • Jim Stoney, Sewanee (IB)
  • Burns, Auburn (NS)
  • Lambert, Texas (NS)
  • Carter, Virginia (NS-2)
  • Sutton, LSU (SS)

Centers

  • Hugh Morgan, Vanderbilt (IB, NS-2, SS-as guard)
  • Adams, Mississippi (NS)
  • Garrett, Tulane (SS)

Quarterbacks

  • Lee Tolley, Sewanee (IB)
  • Costello, Georgetown (NS)
  • Kern, Texas A & M (NS-2)
  • Moody, Alabama (SS)

Halfbacks

Fullbacks

  • Ammie Sikes, Vanderbilt (IB)
  • Reule, Mississippi A & M (NS)
  • Vesmirovsky, Texas A & M (NS-2)
  • Heigenbothom, Texas A & M (SS)

1913[edit]

Key:

D = selected by Mike Donahue, coach at Auburn University.[30] It had a first and second team.

Ends

  • Enoch Brown, Vanderbilt (D-1)
  • Robbie Robinson, Auburn (D-1)
  • Bull Kearley, Auburn (D-2)
  • Hughbert William Conklin, Georgia (D-2)

Tackles

  • Tom Dutton, LSU (D-1)
  • Shorty Schilletter, Clemson (D-1)
  • Lou Louiselle, Auburn (D-2)
  • M.S. Esslinger, Auburn (D-2)

Guards

  • Big Thigpen, Auburn (D-1)
  • F. W. Lockwood, Auburn (D-1)
  • Kirby Malone, Georgia (D-2)
  • Arthur Klock, LSU (D-2)

Centers

Quarterbacks

Halfbacks

Fullbacks

  • Ammie Sikes, Vanderbilt (D-1)
  • Red Harris, Auburn (D-2)

1914[edit]

Key:

IB = selected by Innis Brown, sporting editor for the Atlanta Journal.[31]

DJ = selected by Dick Jemison, sporting editor for the Atlanta Constitution.[31]

ZC = compiled from sports writers, coaches, and others by Z. G. Clevenger, University of Tennessee athletic director.[31]

HC = selected by Harris G. Cope, coach at University of the South.[31]

EG = selected by Ewing Gillis of the New Orleans Item.[31]

WL = selected by W. A. Lambeth, professor at the University of Virginia, "from the opinion of local observers and critics"[31]

Ends

  • Bull Kearley, Auburn (IB, DJ, ZC, HC)
  • Alonzo "Goat" Carroll, Tennessee (DJ, ZC, EG)
  • Robbie Robinson, Auburn (EG)
  • J. C. Senter, Georgia Tech (IB)
  • Big Parker, Sewanee (HC)
  • Jim MacDougal, North Carolina A & M (WL)
  • Roy Homewood, North Carolina (WL)

Tackles

  • Farmer Kelly, Tennessee (IB, DJ, ZC)
  • Bully Van de Graaff, Alabama (ZC, HC, EG)
  • Bob Taylor Dobbins, Sewanee (IB, HC)
  • Taylor, Auburn (DJ, EG-as guard)
  • Roger Maihes, Tulane (EG)
  • A. B. Stoney, South Carolina (WL)
  • Ted Schultz, Washington & Lee (WL)

Guards

  • Big Thigpen, Auburn (DJ, ZC, HC, EG)
  • Mush Kerr, Tennessee (IB, ZC, HC)
  • J. W. Hicks, Alabama (IB)
  • Kirby Lee Spurlock, Mississippi A & M (DJ)
  • Harris Coleman, Virginia (WL)
  • Yank Tandy, North Carolina (WL)

Centers

  • Boozer Pitts, Auburn (IB, DJ, ZC, HC, EG)
  • John Petritz, Georgetown (WL)

Quarterbacks

  • David Paddock, Georgia (IB, DJ, ZC, EG)
  • Lee Tolley, Sewanee (HC)
  • Robert Kent Gooch, Virginia (WL)

Halfbacks

  • Hunter Kimball, Mississippi A & M (IB, DJ, ZC, HC, WL-as fullback)
  • Rabbit Curry, Vanderbilt (DJ, ZC, HC, WL)
  • Ammie Sikes, Vanderbilt (IB, EG)
  • Garrett George, Tulane (EG)
  • Buck Mayer, Virginia (WL)

Fullbacks

  • Rus Lindsay, fullback, Tennessee (IB, ZC, HC)
  • Red Harris, fullback, Auburn (DJ)
  • Bedie Bidez, fullback, Auburn (EG)

1915[edit]

Key:

Numbers (1 through 10) = votes received in a composite All-Southern team selected by ten sports writers and coaches, including those from Memphis, Nashville, Atlanta, Birmingham, Chattanooga, and New Orleans.[32] Votes for multiple positions are combined.

Ends

  • Thompson, Georgia (4)
  • Russ Cohen, Vanderbilt (4)
  • Edmond, Sewanee (3)
  • J. C. Senter, Georgia Tech(3)
  • Roy Homewood, North Carolina(1)

Tackles

  • Bully Van de Graaff, Alabama (10)
  • Josh Cody, Vanderbilt (College Football Hall of Fame) (8)
  • Phillip Cooper, LSU (1)
  • Ted Schultz, Washington & Lee (1)
  • Tom Thrash, Georgia (1)

Guards

  • Taylor, Auburn (10)
  • Bob Lang, Georgia Tech (3)
  • Bob Taylor Dobbins, Sewanee (3)
  • Pryor Williams, Vanderbilt (1)
  • Hamilton, Vanderbilt (1)
  • George Steed, Auburn (1)

Centers

  • Henderson, Georgia (6)
  • Yank Tandy, North Carolina (2)
  • Carey Robinson, Auburn (1)
  • McArthur, Mississippi A & M (1)

Quarterbacks

Halfbacks

  • Fielder, Georgia Tech (3)
  • Froggie Morrison, Georgia Tech (3)
  • Everett Strupper, Georgia Tech (College Football Hall of Fame) (2)
  • Squibb, Chattanooga (2)
  • Barrett, Washington & Lee (1)
  • Buck Mayer, Virginia (1)
  • F. H. Pendergast, Auburn (1)

Fullbacks

  • Neville, Georgia (3)
  • Schrader, Kentucky (1)
  • Hunter, Transylvania (1)
  • Roger Maihes, Tulane (1)
  • Bedie Bidez, Auburn (1)

1916[edit]

Key:

Number beside the name (1 through 4) refers to the number of writers who selected a player All-Southern, from a composite selection of 4 newspapers: The Atlanta Constitution, The Birmingham Age-Herald, The Knoxville Journal and Tribune, and The Nashville Tennessean.[33]

Doc Rodes.

Ends

  • Graham Vowell, Tennessee (4)[34]
  • Charles Jones, Auburn (1)
  • Lloyd Wolfe, Tennessee (1)
  • Robert S. "Si" Bell, Georgia Tech (1)

Tackles

  • Josh Cody, Vanderbilt (College Football Hall of Fame) (3)
  • Walker Carpenter, Georgia Tech (2)
  • Tom Thrash, Georgia (1)
  • Ike Rogers, Alabama (1)
  • Phillip Cooper, LSU (1)

Guards

  • Bob Lang, Georgia Tech (2)
  • W. O. "Chink" Lowe, Tennessee (2)
  • Moon Ducote, Auburn (1)
  • Pryor Williams, Vanderbilt (1)
  • Charles Carmen, Vanderbilt (1)

Center

Quarterbacks

  • Rabbit Curry, Vanderbilt (3)
  • Froggie Morrison, Georgia Tech (1)

Halfbacks

  • Everett Strupper*, Georgia Tech (College Football Hall of Fame) (3)
  • Doc Rodes, Kentucky (2)
  • Bill Folger, North Carolina (1)
  • Cecil Creen, Alabama (1)
  • Red Floyd, Vanderbilt (1)

Fullbacks

  • Tommy Spense, Georgia Tech (3)
  • F. H. Pendergast, Auburn, (1)

1917[edit]

Key:

C = composite selection picked by seven football writers in the South.[35]

H = selected by John Heisman, coach of Georgia Institute of Technology.[35]

DJ = selected by Dick Jemison, sporting editor for the Atlanta Constitution.[35][36]

FD = selected by Fred Digby, sporting editor for the New Orleans Item.[35]

ZN = selected by Zipp Newman, assistant sporting editor for the Birmingham News.[35]

HB = selected by "Happy" Barnes of Tulane University, in the New Orleans Item.[35]

End

  • Moon Ducote, Auburn (C, DJ, FD-as halfback, ZN, HB-as halfback, H-as fullback)
  • Alf Adams, Vanderbilt (C, DJ, H)
  • Marshall Guill, Georgia Tech (FD, HB)
  • Dan Boone, Alabama (ZN)
  • Robert S. "Si" Bell, Georgia Tech (HB)
  • Georgia King, Davidson (H)

Tackle

  • Bill Fincher, Georgia Tech (College Football Hall of Fame) (C, DJ-as guard, FD-as guard, ZN-as guard, HB-as guard, H)
  • Walker Carpenter, Georgia Tech (C, DJ, FD, ZN, HB, H)
  • Otto Colee, Tulane (FD, HB)v

Guard

  • Pete Bonner, Auburn (C, DJ-as tackle, FD-as tackle, ZN-as tackle, HB, H)
  • Tram Sessions, Auburn (C, ZN)
  • H. M. Grey, Davidson (DJ, H)

Center

Quarterback

  • Albert Hill, Georgia Tech (C, DJ, FD, ZN, H)
  • Gene Davidson, Arkansas (HB)

Halfback

  • Everett Strupper*, Georgia Tech (College Football Hall of Fame) (C, DJ, FD, ZN, HB, H)
  • Buck Flowers, Davidson (College Football Hall of Fame) (C, DJ)

Fullback

  • Joe Guyon, Georgia Tech (College Football Hall of Fame) (C, DJ-as end, FD, ZN, HB, H-as halfback)
  • Eben Wortham, Sewanee (DJ, FD-as end, ZN-as halfback)

1919[edit]

Key:

CR = selected by Charles A. Reinhart, sporting editor for the Louisville Courier-Journal.[37]

H = selected by John Heisman, coach at the Georgia Institute of Technology.[37]

MB = selected by Morgan Blake, sporting editor Atlanta Journal.[37]

JLR = selected by J. L. Ray, sporting editor for the Nashville Tennessean.[37]

ST = selected by Stuart Towe, of the Knoxville Journal and Tribune.[37]

D = selected by Mike Donahue, coach at Auburn University.[37]

WGF = selected by W. G. Foster, sporting editor for the Chattanooga Times.[37]

ZN = selected by Zipp Newman of the Birmingham News.[37]

LR = selected by Les Raislinas of the Atlanta Constitution.[37]

FA = selected by Frank Anderson, coach at Oglethorpe University.[37]

BR = selected by Bell Raftery, coach at Washington and Lee University.[37]

X = selected by Xen C. Scott, coach at University of Alabama.[37]

MJ = selected by the Montgomery Journal.[37]

BD = selected by Bruce Dudley, sporting editor of the Louisville Herald.[37]

S = selected by H. J. Stegeman, coach at University of Georgia.[37]

NYS = consensus of various Southern newspapers, published in the New York Sun.[37]

Ends

  • Alf Adams, Vanderbilt (MB, JLR, ST, ZN, LR, FA, MJ, S, NYS)
  • Albert Staton, Georgia Tech (H, MB, ZN, LR, FA, BR, MJ)
  • Bill Fincher, Georgia Tech (College Football Hall of Fame) (ST, WGF, BD, S)
  • Tom Zerfoss, Vanderbilt (CR, JLR)
  • Harry Snoddy, Centre (CR, NYS)
  • Dexter "Jack" Hovater, Alabama (WGF, X)
  • Marv Mattox, Washington and Lee (BD, LR-as quarterback)
  • Owen Reynolds, Georgia (H)
  • Rodney Ollinger, Auburn (D)
  • Dicky White, Tulane (X)
  • W. R. Bower, Mississippi A & M (D)
  • Davies, Washington and Lee (BR)

Tackles

  • Josh Cody, Vanderbilt (College Football Hall of Fame) (H, CR, MB, JLR, ST, D, WGF, ZN, LR, FA, BR, MJ, BD, S, NYS)
  • Pete Bonner, Auburn (H, MB, JLR, ST, D, WGF, ZN, FA, MJ, S, CR-as guard, LR-as guard)
  • Sully Montgomery, Centre (CR, NYS)
  • Turner Bethel, Washington and Lee (LR, BR)
  • Artie Pew, Georgia (S-as guard, X)
  • Babe Carpenter, Mississippi A & M (X)
  • James, Centre (BD)

Guards

  • Dummy Lebey, Georgia Tech (H, D, LR)
  • Ike Rogers, Alabama (CR, ST)
  • Tom Lipscomb, Vanderbilt (JLR, ZN)
  • L. M. Lightsey, Clemson (H, D)
  • Ham Dowling, Georgia Tech (MB, ST)
  • C. C. Warren, Auburn (MB, S)
  • Tom Dutton, LSU (JLR)
  • Ralph Lee Jones, Alabama (ZN)
  • Howard Van Antwerp, Centre (NYS)

Centers

Quarterbacks

  • Bo McMillin*, Centre (College Football Hall of Fame) (CR, ZN, LR-as halfback, S, NYS)
  • Stumpy Banks, Clemson (H)
  • Harold Speer, Furman (MB)
  • Charles Scott, Auburn (JLR)
  • Swayne Latham, Vanderbilt (ST)
  • Marshall Guill, Georgia Tech (D)

Halfbacks

  • Buck Flowers, Georgia Tech (College Football Hall of Fame) (CR, H, MB, JLR, ST, D, ZN, LR, S)
  • Riggs Stephenson, Alabama (CR, JLR, ST-as fullback, ZN)
  • Mullie Lenoir, Alabama (MB, S, NYS)
  • Red Barron, Georgia Tech (H)
  • Willis McCabe, Tennessee (ST)
  • C. S. Howard, Auburn (D)
  • Army Armstrong, Centre (NYS)

Fullbacks

1920[edit]

Key:

C = composite All-SIAA selection of 27 coaches and sporting writers culled by the Atlanta Constitution and Atlanta Journal.[38]

FA = selected by Frank Anderson, coach at Oglethorpe University.[37]

CM = selected by Charley Moran, coach at Centre College.[37]

X = selected by Xen C. Scott, coach at the University of Alabama.[37]

S = selected by H. J. Stegeman, coach at University of Georgia.[37]

JD = selected by James DeHart, assistant coach at University of Georgia.[37]

MB = selected by Morgan Blake, sports editor for the Atlanta Journal.[37]

BD = selected by Bruce Dudley, sports editor for the Louisville Herald.[37]

ED = selected by Ed Danforth, sports editor for the Atlanta Georgian.[37]

WGF = selected by W. G. Foster, sports editor for the Chattanooga Times, along with S. J. McAllister, coach and official.[37]

BH = selected by Blinky Horn, sports editor for the Nashville Tennessean.[37]

SM = selected by Sam H. McMeekin of the Louisville Courier-Journal.[37]

ZN = selected by Zipp Newman, sports editor for the Birmingham News.[37]

KS = selected by the Knoxville Sentinel.[37]

HLL = selected by H. L. Lesbon of the Knoxville Journal and Tribune.[37]

MM = selected by Marvin McCarthy, sports editor for the Birmingham Age-Herald.[37]

JLR = selected by J. L. Ray of the Nashville Banner.[37]

CR = selected by Charles Rinehart, sports editor for the Louisville Courier-Journal.[37]

CW = selected by Cliff Wheatley, sports editor for the Atlanta Constitution.[37]

Ends

  • Owen Reynolds, Georgia (C, FA, CM, S, JD, MB, BD, ED, BH, ZN, MM, JLR, CW)
  • Harry Snoddy, Centre (WGF, BH, SM, ZN, HLL, JLR, CR)
  • Georgie Ratterman, Georgia Tech (FA, CM, BD, WGF)
  • Al Clemens, Alabama (X, ED, CW)
  • Al Staton, Georgia Tech (S, JD, MM-as tackle)
  • John Staton, Georgia Tech (C, MB, KS)
  • John Shirey, Auburn (X, MM)
  • Dicky White, Tulane (KS, HLL)

Tackles

  • Bill Fincher*, Georgia Tech (College Football Hall of Fame) (C, FA, CM, X, S, JD, MB, BD, ED, WGF, BH, SM, ZN, KS, HLL, MM, JLR, CR, CW)
  • Artie Pew, Georgia (C, FA, CB, S, JD, MB, BD, ED, WGF, HLL-as guard, MM-as guard, JLR, CW)
  • Sully Montgomery, Centre (SM, JLR, CR)
  • Buck Hatcher, Tennessee (KS, HLL)

Guards

  • C. C. Warren, Auburn (C, CM, X, JD, BD, BH, SM, JLR, CR, S[39])
  • L. M. Lightsey, Clemson (X-as tackle, S, JD, BD, BH-as tackle)
  • Gink Hendrick, Vanderbilt (FA, SM-as end, KS, CR-as end)
  • Puss Whelchel, Georgia (X, BH, ZN)
  • Tram Sessions, Alabama (MB, WGF, ZN)
  • James, Centre (CM, BD, ZN-as tackle)
  • Dummy Lebey, Georgia Tech (FA, MM)
  • Noisy Grisham, Auburn (ED, CW)
  • Emmett Sizemore, Auburn (KS, HLL)
  • Manning Jeter, Furman (S)

Centers

  • Bum Day, Georgia (C, FA, CM, S, JD, MB, WGF, BH, SM-as guard, KS, HLL, CR-as guard, CW)
  • Noah Caton, Auburn (C-as guard, X, MB-as guard, ED, WGF-as guard, ZN, MM, CW-as guard, S-as guard[39])
  • Red Weaver, Centre, (BD, SM, CR)

Quarterbacks

  • Bo McMillin, Centre (College Football Hall of Fame) (C, FA, CM, X, S, JD, MB, BD, ED, WGF, BH, SM, ZN, KS, HLL, JLR, CR, CW)

Halfbacks

  • Red Barron, Georgia Tech (C, FA, CM, X, S, JD, MB, ED, WGF, BH, SM, KS, HLL, MM, JLR, CR, CW)
  • Buck Flowers, Georgia Tech (College Football Hall of Fame) (C, FA, CM, MB, BD, ED, WGF, BH, SM, ZN, KS, HLL, MM-as quarterback, JLR, CR, CW. S[39])
  • Mullie Lenoir, Alabama (X, SM-as fullback, CR-as fullback)

Fullbacks

  • Riggs Stephenson, Alabama (C, X, S-as halfback, JD, BD-as halfback, WGF, BH, ZN-as halfback, KS, HLL, MM-as halfback, JLR, S[39])
  • Ed Sherling, Auburn (FA, CM, S, JD-as halfback, BD, ZN, MM)
  • Judy Harlan, Georgia Tech (MB, ED, CW)

1921[edit]

Key:

C = Composite All-SIAA team selected by 30 sports writers and announced by the Atlanta Constitution and Atlanta Journal. Each of the eleven selected were presented with gold football badges.[40]

D = selected by Mike Donahue, coach at Auburn University.[41]

BD = selected Bruce Dudley, sporting editor of the Louisville Herald.[42]

Judy Harlan blocking for Red Barron.

Ends

Tackles

  • Al Staton, Georgia Tech (C, D)
  • Artie Pew, Georgia (C)
  • Joe Bennett, Georgia (D)
  • Cregon, Centre (BD)

Guards

Centers

  • Bum Day, Georgia (C, D-as guard, BD-as guard)
  • Ed Kubale, Centre (BD)

Quarterbacks

  • Bo McMillin*, Centre (College Football Hall of Fame) (C, D, BD)

Halfbacks

Fullbacks

For after 1921, see All-Southern.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Greg Roza, Football in the SEC (Southeastern Conference), p. 1, 2007, ISBN 1-4042-1919-6.
  2. ^ a b Bailey, John Wendell (1924). Handbook of Southern Intercollegiate Track and Field Athletics. Mississippi Agricultural and Mechanical College. p. 14. 
  3. ^ a b Southern Inter-Collegiate Athletic Association (PDF). Athens, GA: E. D. Stone. 1895. Retrieved 13 October 2011. 
  4. ^ a b c Roger Saylor, Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association (PDF), College Football Historical Society, The LA84 Foundation, retrieved March 1, 2009.
  5. ^ a b "NEW COLLEGE BODY PLANNED IN SOUTH; Twelve Universities Take Steps to Break Away From Intercollegiate A. A". The New York Times. December 12, 1920. 
  6. ^ "The Southern Conference". Southern Conference. Retrieved 13 October 2011. 
  7. ^ a b ""All Southern" Eleven". The State. February 7, 1902. 
  8. ^ "Sadler Is Made Captain of All-Southern Team". Atlanta Constitution. November 29, 1903. 
  9. ^ "All-Southern Team". Baltimore American. May 30, 1904. 
  10. ^ "Johnny Desaulles Picks All-Southern Football Team". The State. August 27, 1904. 
  11. ^ "Coach Heisman Names All Southern Team". The Atlanta Constitution. December 4, 1904. 
  12. ^ "De Saulles' Choice for the All-Southern". The State. July 28, 1905. 
  13. ^ a b c d e f W. R. Tichenor (December 3, 1905). "Football Experts Give Their Selections For An All-Southern Team". The Atlanta Constitution. 
  14. ^ Official Foot Ball Rules. p. 45. 
  15. ^ "Prof Riggs' All-Southern Team". The State. December 15, 1905. 
  16. ^ "Surprises The Rule During Past Season". The Atlanta Constitution. December 2, 1906. 
  17. ^ "Local Players Named". The Washington Post. December 7, 1906. 
  18. ^ Telegraph "All Southern Football Teams". December 2, 1906. 
  19. ^ "An All Southern Eleven Picked". Fort Worth Star-Telegram. December 23, 1906. 
  20. ^ a b National Collegiate Athletic Association (1907). The Official National Collegiate Athletic Association Football Guide. pp. 27, 49. 
  21. ^ "All Southern Team Pick Leaves Out Louisiana". Times-Picayune. December 15, 1907. 
  22. ^ "All-Southern Eleven". Charlotte Observer. December 16, 1907. 
  23. ^ Spalding's Football Guide. 1909. p. 75. 
  24. ^ a b c Spalding's Football Guide. 1911, 1912. pp. 35, 65. 
  25. ^ "All S. I. A. A. Team.". Times-Picayune. December 8, 1910. 
  26. ^ "Stauffer's Pick; Southern Football". Times-Picayune. December 28, 1911. 
  27. ^ "All-Southern Elevens Picked By Bill Streit". The State (Columbia, South Carolina). December 3, 1911. 
  28. ^ "Innis Brown's All-Southern". Atlanta Constitution. December 1, 1912. 
  29. ^ a b Spalding's Football Guide. 1913. pp. 25, 65. 
  30. ^ "Constitution's All-Southern Picked By Coach Donahue of Champion Auburn Team". Atlanta Constitution. November 30, 1913. 
  31. ^ a b c d e f Spalding's Official Football Guide. NCAA. 1915. 
  32. ^ Dick Jemison (November 30, 1915). "Composite All-Southern Of Ten Of The Dopesters". Atlanta Constitution. 
  33. ^ "All-Southern Football Team As Picked By Sport Writers". Augusta Chronicle. December 3, 1916. 
  34. ^ Consensus could be artifact of brothers Morris and Graham Vowell playing for Tennessee, though Morris was a tackle.
  35. ^ a b c d e f Spalding Football Guide. 1918. 
  36. ^ Jemison, Dick (December 2, 1917). "Dick Jemison Has Ideal Selection for All-Southern". The Montgomery Advertiser. 
  37. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah "All-Southern Elevens". Spalding Football Guide. 1920, 1921. pp. 41, 69; 27, 67. 
  38. ^ "Experts Select Star Athletes". The State. December 5, 1920. 
  39. ^ a b c d A second All-Southern team of Stegeman's in 1920 has different guards and a different backfield.
  40. ^ "All-Southern Football Team". Charlotte Observer. December 4, 1921. 
  41. ^ "Donahue Picks All Southern Eleven". Montgomery Advertiser. December 1, 1921. 
  42. ^ "Another All-Southern Team Picked". The Indianapolis Star. November 27, 1921.