Southwold Pier

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Southwold Pier
Southwold Pier
Official name Southwold Pier
Type Pleasure Pier
Design W Jeffrey
Owner Gough Hotels
Total length 623 feet (190 m)
Opening date 1900

Southwold Pier is a pier in Southwold, Suffolk, East Anglia, England.

Whilst many English seaside piers are in decline, Southwold Pier is enjoying renewed popularity. It includes a collection of modern coin-operated novelty machines designed and constructed by the inventor Tim Hunkin.

History[edit]

The pier was built in 1900, when it extended for a distance of 270 yards (250 m) and finishing with a T-shaped end. The pier end was practically destroyed by a gale in 1934, with the T-shaped end being swept away. A series of events during the Second World War and a further major storm in 1979 reduced the pier to approximately 33 yards (30 m).

Restoration[edit]

The pier was bought by Chris Iredale in 1987 and he first spent five years turning the pavilion into a profit-making business.[1] A major refurbishment program was started in 1999 in order to rebuild the pier. This was completed in 2001 almost 100 years after it was first opened. In 2002 the T-Shaped end was additionally added, bringing the pier to a total length of 208 yards (190 m). This additional length now allows the pier to accommodate visits by Britain's only surviving sea-going steam passenger ship, the PS Waverley paddle steamer and its running mate the MV Balmoral.

Awards[edit]

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Gamble on a near-ruin pays off after 15 years", The Independent, Saturday, 11 January 2003. Retrieved 2010-10-10.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 52°19′48″N 1°41′07″E / 52.32993°N 1.68538°E / 52.32993; 1.68538