USS Ogden (PF-39)

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For other ships of the same name, see USS Ogden and Kusunoki (ship).
Career (United States)
Name: USS Ogden (PG-147)
Namesake: Ogden, Utah
Reclassified: PF-39, 15 April 1943
Builder: Consolidated Steel Corporation, Wilmington, California
Laid down: 21 May 1943
Launched: 23 June 1943
Sponsored by: Miss Margaret S. Shelton
Commissioned: 20 December 1943
Decommissioned: 12 July 1945
Honors and
awards:
3 battle stars, World War II
Fate: Transferred to the Soviet Navy, 12 July 1945[1]
Acquired: Returned by Soviet Navy, 15 October 1949
Fate: Transferred to the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force, 14 January 1953
Acquired: Returned by Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force, 28 June 1977
Fate: Scrapped, 1977
Career (Soviet Union)
Name: EK-10[2]
Acquired: 12 July 1945[1]
Commissioned: 12 July 1945[3]
Fate: Returned to United States, 15 October 1949
Career (Japan)
Name: JDS Kusu (PF-281)
Acquired: 14 January 1953
Renamed: YAS-37, 1962
Renamed: YAC-22, 1964
Decommissioned: 1 April 1976
Fate: Returned to United States, 28 June 1977
General characteristics
Class & type: Tacoma-class frigate
Displacement: 1,264 long tons (1,284 t)
Length: 303 ft 11 in (92.63 m)
Beam: 37 ft 6 in (11.43 m)
Draft: 13 ft 8 in (4.17 m)
Propulsion: 2 × 5,500 shp (4,101 kW) turbines
3 boilers
2 shafts
Speed: 20 knots (37 km/h; 23 mph)
Complement: 190
Armament: • 3 × 3"/50 caliber guns (3×1)
• 4 × 40 mm guns (2×2)
• 9 × 20 mm guns (9×1)
• 1 × Hedgehog anti-submarine mortar
• 8 × Y-gun depth charge projectors
• 2 × depth charge tracks

The first USS Ogden (PF-39) was a Tacoma-class frigate in commission from 1943 to 1945. Originally classified as PG-137, she was the first ship of the United States Navy to be named for Ogden, Utah. She later served in the Soviet Navy as EK-10 and in the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force as Kusu (PF-1), Kusu (PF-281), YAS-50 and YAC-22.

Construction and commissioning[edit]

Ogden was laid down at the Consolidated Steel Corporation shipyard in Los Angeles, California, on 21 May 1943, launched on 23 June 1943, sponsored by Miss Margaret S. Shelton, and commissioned at San Diego, California, on 20 December 1943 with Lieutenant K. C. Tharp, USNR, in command.

Service history[edit]

U.S. Navy, World War II, 1944-1945[edit]

After shakedown out of San Diego, Ogden left San Perdo, California, on 9 March 1944 escorting a convoy via Samoa to Milne Bay, New Guinea, which she reached on 2 April 1944. During this time, she sailed in company with her sister ship USS Van Buren (PF-42) and escorted the merchant tanker SS Fort Erie to Espiritu Santo from 23 to 29 March 1944. Through July 1944 she took part in the operations leap-frogging westward in New Guinea, escorting landing ships and merchant vessels, conducting anti-submarine patrols, and serving as harbor entrance control ship at Humboldt Bay.

Following repairs and training at Brisbane, Australia, in August and September 1944, Ogden supported the buildup of men and shipping for the forthcoming invasion of the Philippine Islands, twice escorting convoys from Manus in the Admiralty Islands to New Guinea staging bases. She herself arrived at Leyte in the Philippines on 2 November 1944, bringing up a convoy which included a U.S. Navy tanker, an Australian merchant ship, and ten tugs pulling a variety of tows. When Japanese planes attacked her convoy that night, one bomb missed her by only 50 yards (46 m).

Ogden returned to New Guinea twice to bring reinforcement convoys to Leyte, and on 12 November 1944 shot down three Japanese kamikaze suicide planes attacking merchant shipping off Leyte. Her gunners scored again off New Guinea on 29 November 1944, assisting in the destruction of two of the torpedo planes which attacked her Leyte-bound convoy.

Ogden left Humboldt Bay on 14 December 1944, bound for Manus, Bora Bora, the Panama Canal, Charleston, South Carolina, and Boston, Massachusetts, where she arrived on 24 January 1945 for repairs, followed by training in Casco Bay, Maine.

Ogden got underway from Casco Bay on 28 March 1945 as part of Escort Division 25 – which also included her sister ships USS Long Beach (PF-34) (the flagship), USS Belfast (PF-35), USS Glendale (PF-36), USS San Pedro (PF-37), and USS Coronado (PF-38) – bound for Seattle, Washington, via the Panama Canal. The six patrol frigates arrived at Seattle on 26 April 1945. They got underway again for Kodiak in the Territory of Alaska on 7 June 1945, but Ogden had to turn around and return to Seattle for repairs.[4]

After repairs, Ogden resumed her voyage and on 27 June 1945 joined her sister ships Long Beach, Belfast, Glendale, San Pedro, Coronado, USS Charlottesville (PF-25), USS Allentown (PF-52), USS Machias (PF-53), and USS Sandusky (PF-54) at Cold Bay, Alaska, to participate in Project Hula, a secret program for the transfer of U.S. Navy ships to the Soviet Navy in anticipation of the Soviet Union joining the war against Japan. Training of Ogden '​s new Soviet Navy crew soon began at Cold Bay.[5]

Soviet Navy, 1945–1949[edit]

Ogden was decommissioned on 12 July 1945 at Cold Bay and transferred to the Soviet Union under Lend-Lease immediately[1] along with nine of her sister ships, the first group of patrol frigates transferred to the Soviet Navy. Commissioned into the Soviet Navy immediately,[3] Ogden was designated as a storozhevoi korabl ("escort ship") and renamed EK-10[2] in Soviet service. On 15 July 1945, EK-10 departed Cold Bay in company with nine of her sister ships – EK-1 (ex-Charlottesville), EK-2 (ex-Long Beach), EK-3 (ex-Belfast), EK-4 (ex-Machias), EK-5 (ex-San Pedro), EK-6 (ex-Glendale), EK-7 (ex-Sandusky), EK-8 (ex-Coronado), and EK-9 (ex-Allentown) – bound for Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky in the Soviet Union. EK-10 served as a patrol vessel in the Soviet Far East.[6]

In February 1946, the United States began negotiations for the return of ships loaned to the Soviet Union for use during World War II. On 8 May 1947, United States Secretary of the Navy James V. Forrestal informed the United States Department of State that the United States Department of the Navy wanted 480 of the 585 combatant ships it had transferred to the Soviet Union for World War II use returned, EK-10 among them. Negotiations for the return of the ships was protracted, but on 15 October 1949 the Soviet Union finally returned EK-10 to the U.S. Navy at Yokosuka, Japan.[7]

Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force, 1953–1977[edit]

Reverting to her original name, Ogden remained idle until transferred to Japan on 14 January 1953. She served in the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force as Kusu (PF-1) (くす (PF-1)?, "camphor tree")[8]. Nara was redesignated PF-282 on 1 September 1957[8]. The ship was reclassified as an "auxiliary service craft" and renamed YAS-50 on 31 March 1970[8], then reclassified as an "auxiliary stock craft" and renamed YAC-22 on 31 March 1971[8]. She was decommissioned on 1 April 1976 and returned to U.S. custody on 28 June 1977. Her fate thereafter is unknown.

Awards[edit]

The U.S. Navy awarded Ogden three battle stars for her World War II service.

References[edit]

This article incorporates text from the public domain Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships. The entry can be found here.

  1. ^ a b c NavSource Online: Frigate Photo Archive Ogden (PF 39) ex-PG-147 states that Ogden was transferred on 13 July 1945, but Russell, Richard A., Project Hula: Secret Soviet-American Cooperation in the War Against Japan, Washington, D.C.: Naval Historical Center, 1997, ISBN 0-945274-35-1, p. 39, which includes access to Soviet-era records unavailable during the Cold War, reports that the transfer date was 12 July 1945. As sources, Russell cites Department of the Navy, Ships Data: U.S. Naval Vessels Volume II, 1 January 1949, (NAVSHIPS 250-012), Washington, DC: Bureau of Ships, 1949; and Berezhnoi, S. S., Flot SSSR: Korabli i suda lendliza: Spravochnik ("The Soviet Navy: Lend-Lease Ships and Vessels: A Reference"), St. Petersburg, Russia: Belen, 1994.
  2. ^ a b NavSource Online: Frigate Photo Archive Ogden (PF 39) ex-PG-147 states that Ogden was named EK-7 in Soviet service, but Russell, Richard A., Project Hula: Secret Soviet-American Cooperation in the War Against Japan, Washington, D.C.: Naval Historical Center, 1997, ISBN 0-945274-35-1, p. 39, which includes access to Soviet-era records unavailable during the Cold War, reports that the ship's Soviet name was EK-10. As sources, Russell cites Department of the Navy, Ships Data: U.S. Naval Vessels Volume II, 1 January 1949, (NAVSHIPS 250-012), Washington, DC: Bureau of Ships, 1949; and Berezhnoi, S. S., Flot SSSR: Korabli i suda lendliza: Spravochnik ("The Soviet Navy: Lend-Lease Ships and Vessels: A Reference"), St. Petersburg, Russia: Belen, 1994.
  3. ^ a b According to Russell, Richard A., Project Hula: Secret Soviet-American Cooperation in the War Against Japan, Washington, D.C.: Naval Historical Center, 1997, ISBN 0-945274-35-1, which includes access to Soviet-era records unavailable during the Cold War, Project Hula ships were commissioned into the Soviet Navy simultaneously with their transfer from the U.S. Navy; see photo captions on p. 24 regarding the transfers of various large infantry landing craft (LCI(L)s) and information on p. 27 about the transfer of USS Coronado (PF-38), which Russell says typified the transfer process. As sources, Russell cites Department of the Navy, Ships Data: U.S. Naval Vessels Volume II, 1 January 1949, (NAVSHIPS 250-012), Washington, DC: Bureau of Ships, 1949; and Berezhnoi, S. S., Flot SSSR: Korabli i suda lendliza: Spravochnik ("The Soviet Navy: Lend-Lease Ships and Vessels: A Reference"), St. Petersburg, Russia: Belen, 1994.
  4. ^ Russell, Richard A., Project Hula: Secret Soviet-American Cooperation in the War Against Japan, Washington, D.C.: Naval Historical Center, 1997, ISBN 0-945274-35-1, pp 24-25.
  5. ^ Russell, Richard A., Project Hula: Secret Soviet-American Cooperation in the War Against Japan, Washington, D.C.: Naval Historical Center, 1997, ISBN 0-945274-35-1, p. 25.
  6. ^ Russell, Richard A., Project Hula: Secret Soviet-American Cooperation in the War Against Japan, Washington, D.C.: Naval Historical Center, 1997, ISBN 0-945274-35-1, pp. 27, 39.
  7. ^ Russell, Richard A., Project Hula: Secret Soviet-American Cooperation in the War Against Japan, Washington, D.C.: Naval Historical Center, 1997, ISBN 0-945274-35-1, pp. 37-38, 39.
  8. ^ a b c d The Naval Database.

External links[edit]