Space Island One

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Space Island One
Format Drama
Science Fiction
Created by Andrew MacLear
Starring Judy Loe
Indra Ove
Angus MacInnes
Bruno Eyron
Julia Bremermann
Kourosh Asad
William Oliver
Country of origin  Isle of Man
 Germany
Original language(s) English
No. of seasons 2
No. of episodes 26 (List of episodes)
Production
Producer(s) Andrew MacLear
Margaret Matheson
Running time 45 minutes
Broadcast
Original channel Sky One
Picture format PAL (576i), 4:3
Audio format Stereophonic sound
Original run 7 January – 9 November 1998 (1998-11-09)

Space Island One (or Raumstation Unity in German) is a British/German science fiction television series that ran for 26 episodes beginning in 1998. A co-production between the UK's Sky One channel and the German Vox channel, it starred Judy Loe as Kathryn McTiernan, the commander of the multinational crew of the space station Unity. Described as “a mix of Moonbase 3 and Jupiter Moon, but more turgid than either,[1] other sources describe it as

"The best science fiction show you've never heard of… The show unflinchingly looks at the implications of for-profit science… and provides the most realistic look ever at life in space, including bone-mass loss. A few episodes are dull, but the show is often surprisingly weird and fun… It also features some of the most complex, believable characters of any television show".[2]

Apart from the show's creator, Andrew MacLear, other script-writers for the show included well known TV writer P. J. Hammond, acclaimed science fiction novelist Stephen Baxter and young adult writer Andrew Lane.

Cast[edit]

  • Judy Loe as Commander Kathryn MacTiernan
  • Angus MacInnes as Lieutenant Commander Walter B. Shannon
  • Bruno Eyron as Dusan Kashkavian
  • Indra Ové as Paula Hernandez
  • William Oliver as Chief Science Officer Lyle Campbell
  • Julia Bremermann as Harriet "Harry" Eschenbach
  • Kourash Asad as Dr. Kaveh Homayuni
  • Sally Grace as the voice of Control

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bradley, Dave (editor) (2005). "Britannia Rules the Airwaves". SFX Collection 22: Best of British: p128. 
  2. ^ #41 on the io9.com list of the Top 100 Science Fiction/Fantasy Shows, found at http://io9.com/5347065/the-top-100-science-fictionfantasy-shows-41-through-50 (retrieved 8/28/09)

External links[edit]