Spain at the 1988 Summer Paralympics

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Spain at the Paralympic Games

Flag of Spain
IPC code  ESP
NPC Comité Paralímpico Español
At the 1988 Summer Paralympics in Seoul
Competitors
Medals Gold
18
Silver
13
Bronze
12
Total
43
Paralympic history (summary)
Summer Games
Winter Games


Spain won 18 gold medal, 13 silver medals and 12 bronze medals.[1]

In 1988, Spain had competitors in archery, wheelchair basketball, swimming, weightlifting, shooting, table tennis and athletics.[1]


Background[edit]

The 1988 Games were held in Seoul, South Korea.[2] The Games used the same venues as the Summer Olympics.[3] Competitors with spinal cord injuries, amputations, cerebral palsy, Les Autres and vision impairments were eligible to compete in these Games.[4]

Closing ceremonies[edit]

There were concerns that the number of medals awarded on the final day of competition would mean that competitors would not be able to attend the 1988 Games closing ceremonies where the flag of Spain was to be raised as the host of the next Games.[5]

Archery[edit]

One of Spain's bronze medals came in archery. It was won by an athlete with a physical disability.[1]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Men's double FITA round open
details
 Tae Sung An
South Korea (KOR)
 Carmelo Scalisi
Belgium (BEL)
 Antonio Rebollo
Spain (ESP)

Athletics[edit]

Six of Spain's gold medals, three silver medals and three bronze medals came in athletics. Eight medals were won by athletes with vision impairments, four won by athletes with cerebral palsy, and nine by athletes with physical impairments. [1]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
800 m A6/A8–9/L4
details
 Angel Marin
Spain (ESP)
 Harri Jauhiainen
Finland (FIN)
 Jean-Yves Arvier
France (FRA)
800 m C8
details
 Robert Biancucci
Australia (AUS)
 Keith Pittman
United States (USA)
 Javier Salmeron
Spain (ESP)
1500 m A6/A8–9/L4
details
 Angel Marin
Spain (ESP)
 Kai Pirttijarvi
Finland (FIN)
 Sameh Ahmed
Egypt (EGY)
1500 m B2
details
 Mariano Ruiz
Spain (ESP)
 Noel Thatcher
Great Britain (GBR)
 Michel Pavon
France (FRA)
5000 m A6/A8–9/L4
details
 Angel Marin
Spain (ESP)
 Hyun Sik Hwang
South Korea (KOR)
 Slobodan Adzic
Yugoslavia (YUG)
5000 m B2
details
 Mariano Ruiz
Spain (ESP)
 Michel Pavon
France (FRA)
 A. Pomykalov
Soviet Union (URS)
Long jump B1
details
 Mineho Ozaki
Japan (JPN)
 Antonio Delgado
Spain (ESP)
 Victor Riabochtan
Soviet Union (URS)
Triple jump B1
details
 Mineho Ozaki
Japan (JPN)
 Sergei Sevastianov
Soviet Union (URS)
 José Manuel Rodriguez
Spain (ESP)
100 m B1
details
 Purificacion Santamarta
Spain (ESP)
 Bang Wol Kim
South Korea (KOR)
 Rossella Inverni
Italy (ITA)
400 m B1
details
 Tamara Pankova
Soviet Union (URS)
 Purificacion Santamarta
Spain (ESP)
 Rossella Inverni
Italy (ITA)
Long jump B1
details
 Joke van Rijswijk
Netherlands (NED)
 Purificacion Santamarta
Spain (ESP)
 Lori Bennett
United States (USA)

Swimming[edit]

Twelve of Spain's gold medals, ten silver medals and eight bronze medals came in swimming. Three medals were won by athletes with vision impairments, nine by athletes with a physical disability and one by an athlete with cerebral palsy.[1]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
400 m freestyle 6
details
 Luis Leardy
Spain (ESP)
 Tomas Hainey
Canada (CAN)
 Gerard Dunne
Ireland (IRL)
100 m backstroke 6
details
 Gerard Dunne
Ireland (IRL)
 Jorge Gotzens
Spain (ESP)
 Juan Castane
Spain (ESP)
100 m backstroke B2
details
 Wieslaw Krol
Poland (POL)
 Pablo Corral
Spain (ESP)
 Jack Krier
United States (USA)
100 m backstroke L6
details
 Mats Einarsson
Sweden (SWE)
 Alberto Gomez
Spain (ESP)
 Alessandro Pisetta
Italy (ITA)
50 m breaststroke B2
details
 Jose Pedrajas
Spain (ESP)
 Eric Ghysel
France (FRA)
 Roman Reszczynski
Poland (POL)
100 m breaststroke B2
details
 Jose Pedrajas
Spain (ESP)
 Alexandre Gapon
Soviet Union (URS)
 Roman Reszczynski
Poland (POL)
100 m breaststroke L6
details
 Jochen Hahnengress
West Germany (FRG)
 Mats Einarsson
Sweden (SWE)
 Alberto Gomez
Spain (ESP)
200 m breaststroke B2
details
 Jose Pedrajas
Spain (ESP)
 Alexandre Gapon
Soviet Union (URS)
 Roman Reszczynski
Poland (POL)
100 m butterfly 6
details
 Gerard Dunne
Ireland (IRL)
 Tomas Hainey
Canada (CAN)
 Luis Leardy
Spain (ESP)
100 m butterfly B1
details
 Timothy McIsaac
Canada (CAN)
 Alberto Dauden
Spain (ESP)
 Jorge Mary
Spain (ESP)
100 m butterfly L6
details
 Mats Einarsson
Sweden (SWE)
 Alberto Gomez
Spain (ESP)
 Leandro Ramos Santos
Brazil (BRA)
200 m individual medley 6
details
 Luis Leardy
Spain (ESP)
 Tomas Hainey
Canada (CAN)
 Gerard Dunne
Ireland (IRL)
200 m individual medley B1
details
 Timothy McIsaac
Canada (CAN)
 Oleg Cher
Soviet Union (URS)
 Jorge Mary
Spain (ESP)
200 m individual medley B2
details
 Per Andersson
Sweden (SWE)
 Jose Corral
Spain (ESP)
 Eric Ghysel
France (FRA)
200 m individual medley L6
details
 Mats Einarsson
Sweden (SWE)
 Gianluca Saini
Italy (ITA)
 Alberto Gomez
Spain (ESP)
4×100 m medley relay B1–B3
details
 Canada (CAN)  Soviet Union (URS)  Spain (ESP)
4×100 m medley relay T/P open
details
 Spain (ESP)  France (FRA)  Israel (ISR)
100 m freestyle 5
details
 Ana Peiro
Spain (ESP)
 Esther Eroles
Spain (ESP)
 Malgorzata Adamik
Poland (POL)
400 m freestyle 5
details
 Ana Peiro
Spain (ESP)
 Esther Eroles
Spain (ESP)
 Malgorzata Adamik
Poland (POL)
400 m freestyle 6
details
 Heidi Kopp
West Germany (FRG)
 Nancy Clarke
United States (USA)
 Pilar Javaloya
Spain (ESP)
100 m backstroke 5
details
 Ana Peiro
Spain (ESP)
 Esther Eroles
Spain (ESP)
 Malgorzata Adamik
Poland (POL)
100 m backstroke 6
details
 Pilar Javaloya
Spain (ESP)
 Nancy Clarke
United States (USA)
 Heidi Kopp
West Germany (FRG)
100 m breaststroke 5
details
 Malgorzata Adamik
Poland (POL)
 Esther Eroles
Spain (ESP)
 Lena-Marie Hagman
Sweden (SWE)
100 m breaststroke L5
details
 Laura Tramuns
Spain (ESP)
 Miia Rantanen
Finland (FIN)
 Esthel Sauter
Switzerland (SUI)
100 m butterfly 6
details
 Pilar Javaloya
Spain (ESP)
 Maria Jussara Matos
Brazil (BRA)
 Graciana Moreira Alves
Brazil (BRA)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e http://www.paralimpico.es/publicacion/5SC_juegos/260SS_juegosparal.asp
  2. ^ Kristine Toohey; Anthony James Veal (2007). The Olympic Games: A Social Science Perspective. CABI. p. 79. ISBN 978-1-84593-346-3. Retrieved 22 July 2013. 
  3. ^ Robert Daniel Steadward; Watkinson, E. J. (Elizabeth Jane); Garry David Wheeler (2003). Adapted Physical Activity. University of Alberta. p. 483. ISBN 978-0-88864-375-9. Retrieved 22 July 2013. 
  4. ^ Karen P. DePauw; Susan J. Gavron (2005). Disability Sport. Human Kinetics 1. p. 91. ISBN 978-1-4504-0847-9. Retrieved 22 July 2013. 
  5. ^ Steve Bailey (28 February 2008). Athlete First: A History of the Paralympic Movement. John Wiley & Sons. p. 88. ISBN 978-0-470-72431-6. Retrieved 22 July 2013.