Spain women's national football team

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
This article is about women's team. For the men's team, see Spain national football team.
Spain
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s) La Roja (The Red [One])[1]
Association Royal Spanish Football Federation
Confederation UEFA (Europe)
Head coach Ignacio Quereda
Captain Verónica Boquete
Most caps Arantza del Puerto (70)
Top scorer Laura del Río (40)
FIFA ranking 14 Increase 1 (27 March 2015)
Highest FIFA ranking 14 (March 2015)
Lowest FIFA ranking 21 (June 2004)
First colours
Second colours
First international
Unofficial
Spain Spain 3–3 Portugal Portugal
(Murcia, Spain; 21 February 1971)
Official
Spain Spain 0–1 Portugal Portugal
(Pontevedra, Spain; 5 February 1983)
Biggest win
Spain Spain 17–0 Slovenia Slovenia
(Palamós, Spain; 20 March 1994)
Biggest defeat
Spain Spain 0–8 Sweden Sweden
(Gandía, Spain; 2 June 1996)
World Cup
Appearances 1
Best result 2015
UEFA Women's Championship
Appearances 2 (First in 1997)
Best result Semifinals (1997)
Spain national team in 2012

The Spain women's national football team (Spanish: Selección femenina de fútbol de España) represents Spain in international women's football.[2] Although not considered a powerhouse like most of the other famous European nations, it has achieved some success like reaching the European Championship's semifinals in 1997. Its youth division has enjoyed some big success in recent times, like their two consecutive wins at the UEFA Women's Under-17 Championship in 2010 and 2011, as well as their third place finish at the FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup, which brought hope to the women's senior team.[3]

In October 2012 the senior team qualified for the European Championship for a second time sixteen years later, after beating Scotland in repechage in the extra time's overtime.[4]

History[edit]

After underground women's football clubs started appearing in Spain around 1970 one of its instigators, Rafael Muga, decided to create a national team. It was an unofficial project as football was considered an unsuitable sport for women by both the Royal Spanish Football Federation and National Movement's Women's Section, which organized women's sports in Francoist Spain. When asked about the initiative in January 1971 RFEF president José Luis Pérez Payá answered I'm not against women's football, but I don't like it either. I don't think it's feminine from a esthetic point of view. Women are not favored wearing shirt and trousers. Any regional dress would fit them better.[5]

One month later, on 21 February 1971, the unofficial Spanish national team, including Conchi Sánchez, who played professionally in the Italian league, made its debut in Murcia's La Condomina against Portugal, ending in a 3–3 draw. The team wasn't allowed to wear RFEF's crest and the referee couldn't wear an official uniform either. On July 15, with a 5-days delay for transfer issues, it played its first game abroad against Italy in Turin's Stadio Comunale, suffering an 8–1 defeat. It was then invited to the 2nd edition of unofficial Women's World Cup, but RFEF forbid them to take part in the competition.[6] Despite these conditions Spain was entrusted hosting the 1972 World Cup. RFEF vetoed the project, and the competition was cancelled and disbanded. The unofficial Spanish team itself broke up shortly after.

After the transition to democracy in the second half of the decade RFEF finally accepted women's football in November 1980, creating first a national cup and next a national team, which finally made its debut under coach Teodoro Nieto on 5 February 1983 in La Guardia, Pontevedra. The opponent was again Portugal, which defeated Spain 0–1. The team subsequently played 2-leg friendlies against France and Switzerland drawing with both opponents in Aranjuez and Barcelona and losing in Perpignan before it finally clinched its first victory in Zürich (0–1).[7] On 27 April 1985 it played its first official match in the 1987 European Championship's qualification, losing 1–0 against Hungary. After losing the first four matches Spain defeated Switzerland and drew with Italy to end third. The team also ended in its group's bottom positions in the subsequent 1989 and 1991 qualifiers. After the former Nieto was replaced by Ignacio Quereda, who has coached the team since.

The 1995 Euro qualifying marked an improvement as Spain ended 2nd, one point from England, which qualified for the final tournament. In these qualifiers Spain attained its biggest victory to date, a 17-0 over Slovenia. In the 1997 Euro qualifying it made a weaker performance, including a record 0–8 loss against Sweden in Gandia, but the European Championship was expanded to eight teams and Spain still made it to the repechage, where it defeated England on a 3–2 aggregate to qualify for the competition for the first time. In the first stage the team drew 1–1 against France, lost 0–1 against host Sweden, and beat 1–0 Russia to qualify on goal average over France to the semifinals, where it was defeated 2–1 by Italy. All three goals were scored by Ángeles Parejo.

This success was followed by a long series of unsuccessful qualifiers. In the 1999 World Cup's qualifying Spain ended last for the first time, not winning a single game. In the 2001 Euro's it made it to the repechage, where it suffered a 3–10 aggregate defeat against Denmark. In the 2003 World Cup's it again ended last despite starting with a 6–1 win over Iceland. In the 2005 Euro's, where a 9–1 win over Belgium was followed by a 5-game non scoring streak, it ended 3rd behind Denmark and Norway. In the 2007 World Cup's the team again ended 3rd behind Denmark and Finland despite earning 7 more points.

In the 2009 Euro's Spain made its better performance since the 1995 qualifiers, narrowly missing qualification as England clinched the top position by overcoming a 2–0 in the final match's second half. Spain had to play the repechage, where it lost both games against the Netherlands. In the 2011 World Cup's Spain again ended 2nd, with no repechage, after England again overcame a half-time 2–0 in their second confrontation.

Results and fixtures[edit]

For all past match results of the national team, see single-season articles and the team's results page

The following matches were played or are scheduled to be played by the national team in the current or upcoming seasons.

      Win       Draw       Loss

Date Venue Opponent Result Competition
October 27, 2013 Spain Collado Villalba, Spain Estonia  6–0 2015 World Cup qualifying
October 31, 2013 Spain Madrid, Spain Italy  2–0
November 23, 2013 Spain Aranjuez, Spain Romania  1–0
November 27, 2013 Spain Fuenlabrada, Spain Czech Republic  3–2
January 14, 2014 Spain La Manga, Spain Norway  1–2 Friendly
February 13, 2014 Spain Logroño, Spain Macedonia  12–0 2015 World Cup qualifying
April 5, 2014 Italy Vicenza, Italy Italy  0–0
April 10, 2014 Republic of Macedonia Skopje, Macedonia Macedonia  0–10
May 8, 2014 Estonia Tallinn, Estonia Estonia  0-5
September 13, 2014 Romania Iaşi, Roumania Romania  0-2
September 17, 2014 Czech Republic Písek, Czech Republic Czech Republic  0-1
February 10, 2015 Spain San Pedro del Pinatar, Spain Austria  2–2 Friendly
February 11, 2015 Spain San Pedro del Pinatar, Spain Belgium  2–1
March 3, 2015 Spain Guadalajara, Spain New Zealand  2–2
March 5, 2015 Spain La Roda, Spain New Zealand  0–0
April 8, 2015 Spain Gijón, Spain Republic of Ireland  1-0
May 30, 2015

Players[edit]

Current squad[edit]

RFEF announced the following preliminary squad for the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup on 23 April.[8]

Caps and goals as of 23 April 2015.

Head coach: Ignacio Quereda

0#0 Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1GK Dolores Gallardo (1993-06-10) June 10, 1993 (age 21) 6 0 Spain Atlético Madrid
1GK Sandra Paños (1992-11-04) November 4, 1992 (age 22) 3 0 Spain Levante UD
1GK Sara Serrat (1995-09-15) September 15, 1995 (age 19) 0 0 Spain Sporting de Huelva
1GK Esther Sullastres (1993-03-20) March 20, 1993 (age 22) 0 0 Spain CD Transportes Alcaine
1GK Ainhoa Tirapu (1984-09-04) September 4, 1984 (age 30) 42 0 Spain Athletic Bilbao
2DF Ivana Andrés (1994-07-13) July 13, 1994 (age 20) 1 0 Spain Valencia CF
2DF Ane Bergara (1987-02-03) February 3, 1987 (age 28) 3 0 Spain Real Sociedad
2DF Miriam Diéguez (1986-05-04) May 4, 1986 (age 29) 29 0 Spain FC Barcelona
2DF Ruth García (1987-04-26) April 26, 1987 (age 28) 43 3 Spain FC Barcelona
2DF Elixabet Ibarra (1981-06-29) June 29, 1981 (age 33) 40 2 Spain Athletic Bilbao
2DF Celia Jiménez (1995-06-20) June 20, 1995 (age 19) 3 0 United States Alabama Crimson Tide
2DF Leire Landa (1986-12-19) December 19, 1986 (age 28) 18 0 Spain FC Barcelona
2DF Paula Nicart (1994-09-08) September 8, 1994 (age 20) 0 0 Spain Valencia CF
2DF Irene Paredes (1991-07-04) July 4, 1991 (age 23) 21 1 Spain Athletic Bilbao
2DF Melanie Serrano (1989-10-12) October 12, 1989 (age 25) 8 0 Spain FC Barcelona
2DF Marta Torrejón (1990-02-27) February 27, 1990 (age 25) 46 7 Spain FC Barcelona
3MF Nagore Calderón (1993-06-02) June 2, 1993 (age 21) 10 2 Spain Atlético Madrid
3MF Marta Corredera (1991-08-08) August 8, 1991 (age 23) 24 2 Spain FC Barcelona
3MF Irene Del Río (1991-10-06) October 6, 1991 (age 23) 0 0 Spain Oviedo Moderno CF
3MF Carolina Férez (1991-06-26) June 26, 1991 (age 23) 0 0 Spain Valencia CF
3MF Débora García (1989-10-17) October 17, 1989 (age 25) 4 0 Spain Atlético Madrid
3MF Jennifer Hermoso (1990-05-09) May 9, 1990 (age 24) 22 9 Spain FC Barcelona
3MF Maitane López (1995-03-13) March 13, 1995 (age 20) 0 0 Spain UD Collerense
3MF Victoria Losada (1991-03-05) March 5, 1991 (age 24) 21 3 England Arsenal Ladies
3MF Silvia Meseguer (1989-03-12) March 12, 1989 (age 26) 33 4 Spain Atlético Madrid
3MF Alexia Putellas (1994-02-04) February 4, 1994 (age 21) 23 4 Spain FC Barcelona
3MF Amanda Sampedro (1993-06-26) June 26, 1993 (age 21) 4 0 Spain Atlético Madrid
3MF Virginia Torrecilla (1994-09-04) September 4, 1994 (age 20) 13 0 Spain FC Barcelona
4FW Sonia Bermúdez (1984-11-18) November 18, 1984 (age 30) 45 26 Spain FC Barcelona
4FW Verónica Boquete (c) (1987-04-09) April 9, 1987 (age 28) 43 29 Germany 1. FFC Frankfurt
4FW Priscila Borja (1985-04-28) April 28, 1985 (age 30) 20 5 Spain Atlético Madrid
4FW Adriana Martín (1986-11-07) November 7, 1986 (age 28) 35 26 Spain Levante UD
4FW Natalia Pablos (1985-10-15) October 15, 1985 (age 29) 21 19 England Arsenal Ladies
4FW Erika Vázquez (1983-02-16) February 16, 1983 (age 32) 43 7 Spain Athletic Bilbao
4FW María Paz Vilas (1988-02-01) February 1, 1988 (age 27) 7 12 Spain Valencia CF

Competitive record[edit]

Overall official record[edit]

Competition Stage Result Opponent Position Scorers
1987 EC QS Regular stage 0–1 1–2 Hungary Hungary 3 / 4
0–2 3–0 Switzerland Switzerland
2–3 1–1 Italy Italy
1989 EC QS Regular stage 1–1 1–0 Bulgaria Bulgaria 4 / 5
0–1 0–2 Czech Republic Czechoslovakia
1–0 0–1 Belgium Belgium
1–3 0–0 France France
1991 EC QS Regular stage 0–0 1–2 Switzerland Switzerland 4 / 5
1–3 0–5 Denmark Denmark
1–0 0–1 Belgium Belgium
1–3 0–0 France France
1993 EC QS Regular stage 0–4 1–1 Sweden Sweden 2 / 3
0–1 1–0 Republic of Ireland Republic of Ireland
1995 EC QS Regular stage 0–0 4–0 Belgium Belgium 2 / 4
0–0 0–0 England England
17–0 8–0 Slovenia Slovenia
1997 EC QS Regular stage (Class A) 0–1 0–2 Denmark Denmark 3 / 4
5–1 2–2 Romania Romania
1–1 0–8 Sweden Sweden
Repechage 2–1 1–1 England England 1 / 2
Norway Sweden 1997 Euro Group stage 1–1 France France 2 / 4
0–1 Sweden Sweden
1–0 Russia Russia
Semifinals 1–2 Italy Italy 3 / 8
1999 WC QS Regular stage (Class A) 1–2 1–2 Ukraine Ukraine 4 / 4
1–2 1–3 Sweden Sweden
0–0 1–1 Iceland Iceland
Promotion 3–0 4–1 Scotland Scotland 1 / 2
2001 EC QS Regular stage (Class A) 2–5 0–7 Sweden Sweden 3 / 4
0–1 1–2 France France
1–1 2–1 Netherlands Netherlands
Repechage 1–6 2–4 Denmark Denmark 2 / 2
2003 WC QS Regular stage (Class A) 6–1 0–3 Iceland Iceland 4 / 4 Jiménez 2, del Río 2, Ferreira, Gimbert
0–2 2–1 Russia Russia Jiménez, del Río
0–3 0–1 Italy Italy
Promotion Cancelled Hungary Hungary
2005 EC QS Regular stage (Class A) 1–0 0–0 Netherlands Netherlands 3 / 5 del Río
0–2 0–2 Norway Norway
9–1 0–2 Belgium Belgium del Río 5, Vázquez 2, Castillo, Gurrutxaga
0–1 0–2 Denmark Denmark
2007 WC QS Regular stage (Class A) 2–3 7–0 Poland Poland 3 / 5 del Río 2
1–0 0–0 Finland Finland Cabezón
3–2 4–2 Belgium Belgium Adriana 2, Cabezón, Gimbert, Gurrutxaga, del Río + 1 o.g.
2–2 0–5 Denmark Denmark Adriana, Vilanova
2009 EC QS Regular stage 3–0 6–1 Belarus Belarus 2 / 5 Vázquez 3, Romero 2, Azagra, Cuesta, Jiménez, Pérez
2–2 4–1 Czech Republic Czech Republic Boquete 2, Adriana, Gimbert, Torrejón, Vilanova
0–1 2–2 England England Bermúdez, Boquete
4–0 3–0 Northern Ireland Northern Ireland Vázquez 2, Bermúdez, Boquete, García, del Río, Vilas
Repechage 0–2 0–2 Netherlands Netherlands 2 / 2
2011 WC QS Regular stage 13–0 9–0 Malta Malta 3 / 5 Adriana 8, Bermúdez 3, Boquete 3, Romero 3, Ibarra 2, Casado, Meseguer + 1 o.g.
2–0 1–0 Austria Austria Adriana 2, Bermúdez
5–0 5–1 Turkey Turkey Adriana 5, Bermúdez 2, Boquete, Olabarrieta, Torrejón
0–1 2–2 England England Adriana, Bermúdez
2013 EC QS Regular stage 10–1 4–0 Turkey Turkey 2 / 6 Adriana 4, Boquete 3, Bermúdez 2, Borja, Corredera, Olabarrieta, Vilas + 1 o.g.
3–2 3–4 Switzerland Switzerland Adriana 2, Boquete 2, García, Vilas
4–0 13–0 Kazakhstan Kazakhstan Vilas 7, Bermúdez 3, Boquete 2, Borja 2, Adriana, Meseguer, Torrejón
4–0 0–0 Romania Romania Boquete 2, Adriana, Bermúdez
2–2 0–5 Germany Germany Boquete, Romero
Repechage 1–1 3–2 Scotland Scotland 1 / 2 Adriana 2, Boquete, Meseguer
Sweden 2013 Euro Group stage 3–2 England England 2 / 4 Boquete, Hermoso, Putellas
0–1 France France
1–1 Russia Russia Boquete
Quarter-finals 1–3 Norway Norway 2 / 2 Hermoso
2015 WC QS Regular stage 6–0 5–0 Estonia Estonia 1 / 6 Natalia 3, Bermúdez 2, Vicky 2, Hermoso 2, Torrejón, Paredes
2–0 0–0 Italy Italy Bermúdez, Natalia
1–0 2–0 Romania Romania Natalia 2, García
3–2 1–0 Czech Republic Czech Republic Bermúdez 2, Corredera, Boquete
12–0 10–0 Republic of Macedonia Macedonia Natalia 6, Bermúdez 5, Hermoso 5, Boquete 2, Calderón 2, Vicky, Torrejón
Canada 2015 World Cup Group stage Costa Rica Costa Rica ? / 4
Brazil Brazil
South Korea Costa Rica

Youth teams[edit]

U-20[edit]

FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup
2002: Did not qualify 2004: 1st round 2006: Did not qualify
2008: Did not qualify 2010: Did not qualify 2012: Did not qualify
2014: Did not qualify

U-19[edit]

UEFA Women's Under-19 Championship
2002: Final Round 2003: Final Round 2004: Nuvola apps mozilla.svg Champion
2005: Second Round 2006: Second Round 2007: Final Round
2008: Final Round 2009: Second Round 2010: Final Round
2011: Final Round 2012: Runner-up 2013: Did not qualify
2014: Runner-up

U-18[edit]

UEFA Women's Under-18 Championship
1998: Did not qualify 1999: Did not qualify 2000: Runner-up
2001: 4th (last edition)

U-17[edit]

FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup
FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup record
Year Round Position Pld W D * L GF GA
New Zealand 2008 Did Not Qualify
Trinidad and Tobago 2010 Third Place 3rd 6 5 0 1 13 6
Azerbaijan 2012 Did Not Qualify
Costa Rica 2014 Runners-up 2nd 6 4 0 2 15 5
Total 2/4 5th place 12 9 0 3 28 11
UEFA Women's Under-17 Championship
Year Round Position MP W D L GF GA
Switzerland 2008 Did Not Qualify
Switzerland 2009 Runners-up 2nd 2 1 0 1 2 7
Switzerland 2010 Champions 1st 5 3 2 0 10 1
Switzerland 2011 Champions 1st 2 2 0 0 5 0
Switzerland 2012 Did Not Qualify
Switzerland 2013 Third Place 3rd 2 1 0 1 6 2
England 2014 Runners-up 2nd 5 3 2 0 10 1
Total 5/7 2 Titles 17 9 4 2 33 11

References[edit]

External links[edit]