Spanish West Africa

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Spanish West Africa
África Occidental Española
Spanish colony

 

 

1946–1958
 

 


Flag

Northwestern African territories under Spanish control in 1912.
Some of these would later be grouped to form Spanish West Africa.
Capital Villa Cisneros
Languages Spanish
Arabic
Religion Roman Catholicism
Islam
Political structure Colony
Royal Commissioner
 -  1885–1886 Emilio Bonelli Hernando
Governor
 -  1946–1949 (first) José Bermejo López
 -  1958 (last) José Héctor Vázquez
High Commissioner
 -  1939–1940 (first) Juan Luis Beigbeder y Atienza
 -  1951–1956 (last) Rafael García Valiño
History
 -  Established December 26, 1946
 -  Disestablished April 10, 1958
Currency Spanish peseta

Spanish West Africa (Spanish: África Occidental Española) is a former possession in the western Sahara Desert that Spain ruled after giving much of its former northwestern African possessions to Morocco. It was created in December 1946,[citation needed] and combined Ifni, Cape Juby and Spanish Sahara.

History[edit]

Spanish colonisation[edit]

The first Spaniard arrived in western Africa at the end of the Middle Ages. The very first may have been the Balearic traveller Jaume Ferrer who disappeared in 1375 on the journey off the African coast,[1] or one of the Castilians who landed at Boujdour in 1405 and attacked a caravan there.[2]

Governors[edit]

  • 1885-1901 Emilio Bonelli Hernando - Royal Commissioner, deputy governor of the Canary Islands from 1887
  • 1901-1903 Ángel Villalobos - deputy governor of the Canary Islands, governor of Río de Oro from 1901
  • 1903-1925 Francisco Bens Argandoña; - governor of Río de Oro
  • 1925-1932 Guillermo de la Peña Cusi - governor of Río de Oro
  • 1932-1933 Eduardo Canizares Navarro - governor of Río de Oro
  • 1933-1934 José González Deleito - governor of Río de Oro
  • 1934-1936 Benigno Martínez Portillo - governor of Río de Oro (serving the High Commissioner of Morocco)
  • 1936 Carlos Pedemonte Sabin - governor of Río de Oro (serving the High Commissioner of Morocco)
  • 1936-1937 Rafael Gallego Sainz - governor of Río de Oro (serving the High Commissioner of Morocco)
  • 1937-1940 Antonio de Oro Pulido - governor of Río de Oro (serving the High Commissioner of Morocco)
  • 1940-1949 José Bermejo López - governor of Río de Oro (serving the High Commissioner of Morocco), Governor General of Spanish West Africa, High Commissioner and governor of Río de Oro from 1946
  • 1949-1952 Francisco Rosaleny Burguet - Governor General of Spanish West Africa (serving the High Commissioner of Morocco) a governor of Río de Oro
  • 1952-1954 Venancio Tutor Gil - Governor General of Spanish West Africa (serving the High Commissioner of Morocco) a governor of Río de Oro)
  • 1954-1957 Ramón Pardo de Santallana Suárez - Governor General of Spanish West Africa (serving the High Commissioner of Morocco) a governor of Río de Oro
  • 1957-1958 Mariano Gómez Zamalloa y Guirce - Governor General of Spanish West Africa (serving the High Commissioner of Morocco until 1956) a governor of Río de Oro
  • 1958 José Héctor Vázquez - Governor General of Spanish Sahara
  • 1958-1961 Mariano Alonso Alonso - Governor General of Spanish Sahara
  • 1961-1964 Pedro Latorre Alcubierre - Governor General of Spanish Sahara
  • 1964-1965 Joaquín Agulla Jiménez Coronado - Governor General of Spanish Sahara
  • 1965 Adolfo Artalejo Campos - Governor General of Spanish Sahara
  • 1965-1967 Ángel Enríquez Larrondo - Governor General of Spanish Sahara
  • 1967-1971 José María Pérez de Lema Tejero - Governor General of Spanish Sahara
  • 1971-1974 Fernando de Santiago y Díaz de Mendívil - Governor General of Spanish Sahara
  • 1974-1976 Federico Gómez de Salazar y Nieto - Governor General of Spanish Sahara

References[edit]

  1. ^ Russell, Peter E. (1995) Portugal, Spain, and the African Atlantic, 1343-1490: chivalry and crusade from John of Gaunt to Henry the Navigator, Varorium.
  2. ^ Besenyǒ, János (2010). "Western-Sahara under the Spanish Empire". AARMS 9 (2). pp. 195–215. Retrieved 9 April 2012. 

See also[edit]