Sparging (chemistry)

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In chemistry, sparging, also known as gas flushing in metallurgy, is a technique which involves bubbling a chemically inert gas, such as nitrogen, argon, or helium, through a liquid. This can be used to remove dissolved gases (e.g. oxygen) from the liquid.

Liquid chromatography[edit]

Solvents used in high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) are often sparged with helium.[1]

Engineering[edit]

In chemical engineering, sparging can also be a method to remove low-boiling liquids from a solution. The low-boiling components tend to evaporate more rapidly, hence they may be removed from the bulk solution containing higher-boiling components. It is an alternative to distillation, and it does not require heat.

Environmental chemistry[edit]

This technique is also used in environmental chemistry to extract the oil contaminants from subsoil water and the ground.

Metallurgy[edit]

In metallurgy, this process is used to remove dissolved gases from the melt prior to the material being processed.[2][3] For example, before casting aluminium alloys, argon bubbles are injected into liquid aluminium using a rotary degasser. The resulting argon bubbles will rise to the surface bringing with them a quantity of the dissolved hydrogen. This degassing treatment reduces the occurrence of hydrogen gas porosity.

References[edit]

  1. ^ M. W. Dong (2000). "Precision in HPLC. Mastering the art of HPLC". Today's Chemist at Work (American Chemical Society) 9 (8): 28–32. 
  2. ^ Degarmo, E. Paul; Black, J T.; Kohser, Ronald A. (2003). Materials and Processes in Manufacturing (9th ed.). Wiley. p. 284. ISBN 0-471-65653-4. 
  3. ^ Stefanescu, D. M. (1990). ASM handbook. Materials Park, OH: ASM International. ISBN 0-87170-021-2.