Speaker of the Indiana House of Representatives

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The Speaker of the Indiana State House of Representatives is the highest official in the Indiana House of Representatives, customarily elected from the ranks of the majority party. As in most Anglosphere countries and provinces, the speaker presides over the lower house of the legislature.

The current Speaker is Brian C. Bosma.

List of Speakers (Since Statehood, 1816-)[edit]

Speaker Party City/County Start of service End of service Birthyear-Death Notes
Isaac Newton Blackford No Party 1 Vincennes, Knox County November 4, 1816 January 3, 1817 (1786–1859) First Speaker of the House after Statehood; State Supreme Court Justice (1817–53); Candidate for Governor & U.S. Senate
Amos Lane No Party Lawrenceburg, Dearborn County December 1, 1817 January 29, 1818 (1778–1849) Later U.S. Congressman (1833–37)
Williamson Dunn No Party Jefferson County December 7, 1818 January 22, 1820 (1781–1854) First Speaker to serve two terms; Father of three future State Representatives; Brother-in-law of Speaker David Hervey Maxwell
William Graham No Party Jackson County November 27, 1820 January 9, 1821 (1782–1858) Later U.S. Congressman (1837–39)
Samuel Milroy No Party Washington County November 19, 1821 January 3, 1822 (1780–1845) Father of two future State Representatives; founded town of Delphi, Indiana
General Washington Johnston No Party Vincennes, Knox County December 2, 1822 January 11, 1823 (1776–1833) Territorial Attorney-General (1811–14); Territorial Auditor (1813); Adjutant-General (1813); Territorial Treasurer (1813–14)
David Hervey Maxwell Adams-Clay Republican Bloomington, Monroe County December 1, 1823 January 31, 1824 (1786–1854) Later Mayor of Bloomington (1848); Brother-in-law of Speaker Williamson Dunn
Stephen C. Stevens Adams Supporter Franklin County January 10 February 12, 1825 (c1793-1870) Later Supreme Court Justice (1831–36); 1846 Gubernatorial Candidate
Robert Morgan Evans Adams Supporter Princeton, Gibson County December 5, 1825 January 21, 1826 (1783–1844) 1833 Congressional Candidate; Brother of Speaker Thomas Jefferson Evans
Harbin H. Moore Adams Supporter Harrison County December 4, 1826 January 24, 1828 (c1791-1834) First Speaker to serve three terms (non-consecutive); Attorney-General (1822); 1828 Gubernatorial Candidate; 1833 Congressional Candidate
Isaac Howk Adams Supporter Clark County December 1, 1828 January 24, 1829 (1793–1833) 1831 Congressional Candidate
Ross Smiley Jacksonian Dunlapsville, Union County December 7, 1829 January 30, 1830 (1788–1878) 1828 Presidential Elector; Lived to age of 90
Isaac Howk Anti-Jacksonian Clark County December 6, 1830 February 10, 1831 (1793–1833) (See note above) 2nd Term
Harbin H. Moore Anti-Jacksonian Floyd County December 5, 1831 February 3, 1832 (c1791-1834) (See note above) 3rd Term
John Wesley Davis Jacksonian Carlisle, Sullivan County December 3, 1832 February 4, 1833 (1799–1859) Served in US Congress (1835–41; 1843–47); Speaker of the US House of Representatives (1845–47); US Commissioner to China (1848–50); Oregon Governor (1853–54)
Nathan B. Palmer Jacksonian Jefferson County December 2, 1833 February 3, 1834 (1790–1875) 1832 Presidential Elector; State Treasurer (1834–41); 1841 Congressional Candidate
James Gregory Anti-Jacksonian Warren County December 1, 1834 February 9, 1835 (1785–1843) Father of three future state legislators; 1835 Congressional Candidate; Died in Yucatán, Mexico
Caleb Blood Smith Anti-Jacksonian Connersville, Fayette County December 7, 1835 February 6, 1837 (1808–1864) 1840 & 1856 Presidential Elector; Served in US Congress (1843–49); 1848 U.S. Senate Candidate; US Secretary of the Interior (1861–62)
Thomas Jefferson Evans Whig Covington, Fountain County December 4, 1837 February 18, 1839 (c1795-1841) 1839 Congressional Candidate; Brother of Speaker Robert Morgan Evans
James Gray Read Democrat Jeffersonville, Clark County December 2, 1839 February 24, 1840 (1793–1869) 1831 Gubernatorial Candidate; 1832 U.S. Senate Candidate; 1844 Presidential Elector
Samuel Judah Whig Vincennes, Knox County December 7, 1840 February 15, 1841 (1798–1869) US Attorney for Indiana (1829–33); 1831 U.S. Senate Candidate
John Wesley Davis Democrat Carlisle, Sullivan County December 6, 1841 January 31, 1842 (1799–1859) (See note above) 2nd Term
Thomas Jefferson Henley Democrat Clark County December 5, 1842 February 13, 1843 (1808–1875) First native-born Speaker. Later US Congressman (1843–49); Moved to California during the '49 Gold Rush; 1852 Presidential Elector from California
Andrew L. Robinson Democrat Carroll County December 4, 1843 January 15, 1844 (1807–1883) 1852 Gubernatorial Candidate
Alexander Campbell Stevenson Whig Putnam County December 2, 1844 January 13, 1845 (1802–1889)
John Smith Simonson Democrat Charlestown, Clark County December 1, 1845 January 20, 1846 (1796–1881) 1837 Congressional Candidate
Robert N. Carnan Whig Vincennes, Knox County December 7, 1846 January 28, 1847 (1805–1887)
William Anderson Porter Whig Corydon, Harrison County December 6, 1847 February 17, 1848 (1800–1884) Last Whig Speaker
Thomas A. Hendricks Democrat East Fultonham, Muskingum County February 17, 1848 December 4, 1848 (1819–1885) U.S. Congressman (1851–55), U.S. Senator (1863–69), Governor of Indiana (1873–77), U.S. Vice President (1885)
George Whitfield Carr Democrat Leesville, Lawrence County December 4, 1848 January 21, 1850 (1807–1892) 1848 Presidential Elector; President of the Constitutional Convention (1850–51); 1858 & 1872 Congressional Candidate
Ebenezer Dumont Democrat Lawrenceburg, Dearborn County December 30, 1850 February 14, 1851 (1814–1871) 1852 Presidential Elector; US Congressman (1863–67)
John Wesley Davis² Democrat Carlisle, Sullivan County December 1, 1851 June 21, 1852³ (1799–1859) (See note above) 3rd Term
William Hayden English² Democrat Lexington, Scott County (See above) (See above) (1822–1896) Later US Congressman (1853–61); Smithsonian Institution Regent (1853–61); 1880 Vice-Presidential Candidate
Oliver Brooks Torbet Democrat Dearborn County January 6 March 7, 18534 (1827–1864) Youngest Speaker (25); Died at 37
David Kilgore Fusion/Oppositionist5 Delaware County January 4 March 5, 1855 (1804–1879) Later US Congressman (1857–61)
Ballard Smith Democrat Cannelton, Perry County January 8 March 9, 1857 (1821–1866)
Jonathan W. Gordon Republican Indianapolis, Marion County January 6 March 7, 18596 (1820–1887) 1872 Presidential Elector; Clerk of the State Supreme Court (1881–82)
Cyrus McCracken Allen Republican Vincennes, Knox County January 10 March 11, 18617 (1817–1883) 1860 Presidential Elector; 1864 Congressional Candidate
Samuel Hamilton Buskirk Democrat Monroe County January 8 March 9, 1863 (1820–1879) 1856 Presidential Elector; State Supreme Court Justice (1870–76)
John Upfold Pettit Republican Wabash, Wabash County January 5 March 6, 18658 (1820–1881) US Congressman (1855–61); Father of Speaker Henry Corbin Pettet
David Cummins Branham Republican Madison, Jefferson County January 10 March 11, 1867 (1812–1877)
Ambrose P. Stanton9 Republican Indianapolis, Marion County January 7 March 8, 1869 (1834–1912)
George Abraham Buskirk9 Republican Bloomington, Monroe County April 8 May 17, 1869 (1829–1874)
William Gray Mack Democrat Terre Haute, Vigo County January 5 February 27, 1871 (1827–1898)
William Kirkpatrick Edwards Republican Terre Haute, Vigo County January 9 March 10, 187310 (1820–1878) Mayor of Terre Haute (1853); 1860 Presidential Elector
David Turpie Democrat Indianapolis, Marion County January 7 March 8, 187511 (1829–1909) 1862, 1864 & 1866 Congressional Candidate; U.S. Senator (1863; 1887–1899); U.S. District Attorney for Indiana (1886–87)
John Overmyer Republican North Vernon, Jennings County January 4 March 5, 187712 (1844–1919) Later switched to Democratic party in 1892
Henry Sullivan Cauthorn January ? March ?, 187913
William Marion Ridpath Republican Clay County January 6 March 7, 188114 (1845–1914) Moved to Dakota Territory after leaving Speakership
William D. Bynum Democrat Indianapolis, Marion County January 4 March 5, 1883 (1846–1927) Mayor of Washington, Indiana (1875–79); 1876 Presidential Elector; US Congressman (1885–95)
Charles LaFayette Jewett Democrat New Albany, Floyd County January 8 March 9, 188515 (1848–1931)
Warren Grover Sayre Republican Wabash, Wabash County January 6 March 7, 1887 (1844–1931) Mayor of Wabash (1868–76)
Mason Jenks Niblack Democrat Vincennes, Knox County January 10, 1889 March 9, 1891 (1857–1926) U.S. House Parliamentarian; First consecutively reelected Speaker since 1849
James B. Curtis Democrat Indianapolis, Marion County January 5 March 6, 1893 (1859–1922)
Justus C. Adams Republican Indianapolis, Marion County January 10 March 11, 1895 (1841–1904)
Henry Corbin Pettit Republican Wabash, Wabash County January 7 March 8, 1897 (1863–1913) Mayor of Wabash (1888–90); Son of Speaker John Upfold Pettit
Frank Leslie Littleton Republican Indianapolis, Marion County January 5 March 6, 1899 (1868–1935)
Samuel Raleigh Artman Republican Lebanon, Boone County January 1901 (1866–1930)
Henry Wright Marshall, Sr. Republican Lafayette, Tippecanoe County January 1903 (1865–1957) Lived to age of 92.
Emmett Forrest Branch Republican Martinsville, Morgan County 1907 1909 (May 16, 1874 - February 23, 1932) Later Governor of Indiana (1924–1925)
Harry G. Leslie Republican Lafayette, Tippecanoe County 1925 1927 (April 6, 1878 - December 10, 1937) Later Governor of Indiana (1929–1933)
Edward H. Stein Democrat Bloomfield, Greene County 1935 1937 (September 1, 1891 - October 1, 1965)
J. Roberts Dailey Republican January 1981 (June 22, 1919 – August 13, 2005)
John R. Gregg Democrat Sandborn, Knox County 1996 2002
B. Patrick Bauer Democrat South Bend, St. Joseph County January 2003 January 2005
Brian C. Bosma Republican January 2005 January 2007
B. Patrick Bauer Democrat January 2007 January 2011
Brian C. Bosma Republican January 2011 present

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • 1. No party labels from 1816–1823, as there were no organized partisan political groups in the state during this period (although all federal officeholders during this period were Democrat-Republicans).
  • 2. Reference sources list the 36th General Assembly having 2 Speakers (Davis & English)
  • 3. The 36th General Assembly had two separate sessions, the first from December 1, 1851 until March 10, 1852 and April 20, 1852 until June 21, 1852. This was the first time the legislature convened outside of the late fall and winter.
  • 4. Beginning in 1853, regular legislature sessions convened every 2 years.
  • 5. The Fusionists were the remaining members of differing factions of former Whigs, Free-Soilers, anti-slavery Democrats, most of whom would become Republicans.
  • 6. A special session of the 40th General Assembly was convened previously to the regular session from November 20 to December 25, 1858.
  • 7. A special session of the 41st General Assembly was convened after the regular session from April 24 to June 2, 1861. This session was mistakenly considered the 42nd General Assembly, but was later considered a special session. Because of this error, the following regular session became the 43rd General Assembly, hence there was no official 42nd General Assembly convened.
  • 8. A special session of the 44th General Assembly was convened after the regular session from November 13 to December 22, 1865.
  • 9. Ambrose P. Stanton only served as Speaker during the regular session of the 46th General Assembly. George Buskirk served as Speaker during the special session.
  • 10. A special session of the 48th General Assembly was convened before the regular session from November 13 to December 22, 1872.
  • 11. A brief special session of the 49th General Assembly was convened the day after the regular session ended, from March 9 to March 15, 1875.
  • 12. A brief special session of the 50th General Assembly was convened the day after the regular session ended, from March 6 to March 15, 1877.
  • 13. A special session of the 51st General Assembly was convened the day after the regular session ended, from March 11 to March 31, 1879.
  • 14. A special session of the 51st General Assembly was convened the day after the regular session ended, from March 8 to April 16, 1881.
  • 15. A special session of the 53rd General Assembly was convened the day after the regular session ended, from March 10 to April 13, 1885.
  • Source: A Biographical Directory of the Indiana General Assembly