Gothic runic inscriptions

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Spearhead of Kovel)
Jump to: navigation, search

Very few Elder Futhark inscriptions in the Gothic language have been found in the territory historically settled by the Goths (Wielbark culture, Chernyakhov culture). This is due to the early Christianization of the Goths, with the Gothic alphabet replacing runes by the mid 4th century.

There are about a dozen candidate inscriptions, and only three of them are widely accepted to be of Gothic origin: the gold ring of Pietroassa, bearing a votive inscription, part of a larger treasure found in the Romanian Carpathians, and two spearheads inscribed with what is probably the weapon's name, one found in the Ukrainian Carpathians, and the other in eastern Germany, near the Oder.

Ring of Pietroassa[edit]

Main article: Ring of Pietroassa

A gold ring (necklace) found in 1837 in Pietroassa (recte Pietroasa, north-western Romania, some 50 km south of Satu Mare), dated to the ca. AD 400, bearing an Elder Futhark inscription of 15 runes. The ring was stolen in 1875, and clipped in two with pliers by a Bucharest goldsmith. It was recovered, but the 7th rune is now destroyed:

gutani [?] wi hailag (ᚷᚢᛏᚨᚾᛁ [?] ᚹᛁ ᚺᚨᛁᛚᚨᚷ).

In pre-1875 drawings and descriptions it was read as othala [1], gutaniowi hailag (ᚷᚢᛏᚨᚾᛁᛟᚹᛁ ᚺᚨᛁᛚᚨᚷ), interpreted as either gutanio wi hailag "sacred to the gothic women", or gutan-iowi hailag "sacred to the Jove of the Goths" (Loewe 1909; interpreted as Thunraz), or gutani o[thala] hailag "sacred inheritance of the Goths" (gutani is the genitive plural, for Ulfilan gutane (𐌲𐌿𐍄𐌰𐌽𐌴). old Norse (gutar aevi heilag]

The identity of the 7th rune as othala has since been called into question, but a photograph taken for London's Arundel Society before it was vandalised has recently been republished and the damaged rune is clearly an ᛟ (Mees 2004). How to interpret gutanio remains a matter of some dispute among runologists, however (Nedoma 2003).

Spearhead of Kovel[edit]

The spearhead of Kovel

The head of a lance, found in 1858 Suszyczno,[1] 30 km from Kovel, Ukraine, dated to the early 3rd century. [2] [3]

The spearhead measures 15.5 cm with a maximal length of 3.0 cm. Both sides of the leaf were inlaid with silver symbols. The inscription notably runs right to left, reading tilarids, interpreted as "thither rider", the name either of a warrior, or of the spear itself. It is identified as East Germanic (Gothic) because of the nominative -s (in contrast to Proto-Norse -z). The t and d are closer to the Latin alphabet than to the classical Elder Futhark, as it were <TᛁᛚᚨᚱᛁDᛊ>.

An 1880 casting of the spearhead is exhibited in Berlin, an 1884 casting in Warsaw. The original was looted by Nazi archaeologists from its Polish owner in 1939 and it was lost altogether at the end of WWII.

Spearhead of Dahmsdorf-Müncheberg[edit]

The spearhead of Dahmsdorf-Müncheberg

The head of a lance, found in Dahmsdorf-Müncheberg, in Brandenburg between Berlin and the Oder River, inscribed with ranja (ᚱᚨᚾᛃᚨ) (Ulfilan rannja [𐍂𐌰𐌽𐌽𐌾𐌰], "router"). [4]

Spindle whorl of Letcani[edit]

Spindle whorl found in Letcani, Romania, dated to the 4th century.

adonsufhe :rango: (ᚨᛞᛟᚾᛊᚢᚠᚺᛖ ᛬ᚱᚨᚾᚷᛟ᛬)

Buckle of Szabadbattyan[edit]

Silver buckle found in Szabadbattyán, Hungary, dated to the early 5th century.

marings (ᛗᚨᚱᛁᚾᚷᛊ)

Literature[edit]

  1. ^ (Polish) Suszyszno in the Geographical Dictionary of the Kingdom of Poland, volume XI (Sochaczew — Szlubowska Wola) 1890
  • Marstrander, Carl, 'De gotiske runeminnesmaerker', Norsk tidskrift for sprogvidenskap 3 (1929), 25-157.
  • Ebbinghaus, Ernst, 'The question of Visigothic runic inscriptions re-examined', General Linguistics 30 (1990), 207-14.
  • Dietrich, Franz E.C., De inscriptionibus duabus Runicis ad Gothorum gentem relatis (Marburg: Elwert, 1861).
  • Loewe, Richard, 'Der Goldring von Pietroassa', Indogermanische Forschungen 26 (1909), 203-8.
  • Graf, Heinz-Joachim, 'Gutanio wi hailag oder Gutaniom hailag? - Zur Lesung des Ringes von Pietroasa', Germanisch-Romanische Monatsschrift 31 (1943), 128-29.
  • Mees, Bernard, Runo-Gothica: The runes and the origin of Wulfila's script, Die Sprache 43 (2002/3 [publ. 2004]), 55-79.
  • Nedoma, Robert. 'Pietroassa, § 2. Runologisches', in Reallexikon der Germanischen Altertumskunde, vol. 23 (2003), pp. 155–58.