Special Immigration Appeals Commission

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For the United States collegiate athletic conference, see Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (SIAC)

The Special Immigration Appeals Commission (also known by the acronym SIAC) is a superior court of record in the United Kingdom established by the Special Immigration Appeals Commission Act 1997[1] that deals with appeals from persons deported by the Home Secretary under various statutory powers, and usually related to matters of national security.[2] SIAC also hears persons deprived of British citizenship under the British Nationality Act 1981 as amended by Section 4 of the Nationality, Immigration and Asylum Act 2002.[3]

An appellant is represented to the Commission by a special advocate who is a person vetted by the Security Service with controversy surrounding the use of secret evidence which only the judges and special advocates have access to.[4]

It previously had the power to certify a person as an international terrorist under Part 4 of the Anti-terrorism, Crime and Security Act 2001 until this was repealed by the Prevention of Terrorism Act 2005.[citation needed]

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  1. ^ "Section 1 Special Immigration Appeals Commission Act 1997". Acts of the Parliament of the United Kingdom 1997 (68) (UK Statute Law Database). p. 1. Retrieved 2009-09-03. There shall be a commission, known as the Special Immigration Appeals Commission, for the purpose of exercising the jurisdiction conferred by this Act. 
  2. ^ "Q&A: Secret court explained". BBC News. 28 April 2004. Retrieved 2009-09-03. It is the venue of appeal for foreign nationals facing detention, deportation or exclusion from the UK on grounds of national security. It has the same powers as the High Court and is presided over by senior judges. 
  3. ^ "Section 4, Nationality, Immigration and Asylum Act 2002". Acts of the Parliament of the United Kingdom 2002 (41) (UK Statute Law Database). p. 2. Retrieved 2009-09-03. There shall be a commission, known as the Special Immigration Appeals Commission, for the purpose of exercising the jurisdiction conferred by this Act. 
  4. ^ "Q&A: Secret court explained". BBC News. 28 April 2004. Retrieved 2009-09-03. Once appointed, the SA has the right to see all of the secret evidence in the Home Secretary's hands. Under no circumstances can they reveal any of it to the appellant or his legal team. 

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