Spencer, Indiana

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Spencer, Indiana
Town
Owen County courthouse in Spencer
Owen County courthouse in Spencer
Location of Spencer in the state of Indiana
Location of Spencer in the state of Indiana
Coordinates: 39°17′13″N 86°45′51″W / 39.28694°N 86.76417°W / 39.28694; -86.76417Coordinates: 39°17′13″N 86°45′51″W / 39.28694°N 86.76417°W / 39.28694; -86.76417
Country United States
State Indiana
County Owen
Township Washington
Area[1]
 • Total 1.26 sq mi (3.26 km2)
 • Land 1.26 sq mi (3.26 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 561 ft (171 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 2,217
 • Estimate (2012[3]) 2,328
 • Density 1,759.5/sq mi (679.3/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 47460
Area code(s) 812
FIPS code 18-71972[4]
GNIS feature ID 0443934[5]
Website http://www.spencer.in.gov/

Spencer is a town in Washington Township, Owen County, Indiana, United States. The population was 2,217 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Owen County.[6]

Spencer is part of the Bloomington, Indiana Metropolitan Statistical Area.

History[edit]

Spencer was platted in 1820. It was named for Captain Spier Spencer, who fell at the Battle of Tippecanoe.[7]

Geography[edit]

Spencer is located at 39°17′13″N 86°45′51″W / 39.28694°N 86.76417°W / 39.28694; -86.76417 (39.286848, -86.764225).[8]

According to the 2010 census, the town has a total area of 1.26 square miles (3.3 km2), all land.[1]

Climate[edit]

The climate in this area is characterized by hot, humid summers and generally mild to cool winters. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Spencer has a humid subtropical climate, abbreviated "Cfa" on climate maps.[9]

Demographics[edit]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 2,217 people, 1,008 households, and 554 families residing in the town. The population density was 1,759.5 inhabitants per square mile (679.3/km2). There were 1,123 housing units at an average density of 891.3 per square mile (344.1/km2). The racial makeup of the town was 98.1% White, 0.1% African American, 0.2% Native American, 0.5% Asian, 0.2% from other races, and 0.9% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.1% of the population.

There were 1,008 households of which 24.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 38.4% were married couples living together, 12.8% had a female householder with no husband present, 3.8% had a male householder with no wife present, and 45.0% were non-families. 40.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 18.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.12 and the average family size was 2.81.

The median age in the town was 41.8 years. 20.1% of residents were under the age of 18; 9.4% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 24.2% were from 25 to 44; 26.3% were from 45 to 64; and 19.8% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the town was 47.2% male and 52.8% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 2,508 people, 1,090 households, and 659 families residing in the town. The population density was 1,984.6 people per square mile (768.5/km²). There were 1,193 housing units at an average density of 944.0 per square mile (365.6/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 98.52% White, 0.20% African American, 0.40% Asian, 0.24% from other races, and 0.64% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.60% of the population.

There were 1,090 households out of which 27.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.1% were married couples living together, 12.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 39.5% were non-families. 35.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 18.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.23 and the average family size was 2.88.

In the town the population was spread out with 23.0% under the age of 18, 10.1% from 18 to 24, 26.7% from 25 to 44, 20.3% from 45 to 64, and 20.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 83.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 81.9 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $28,664, and the median income for a family was $36,921. Males had a median income of $29,679 versus $21,531 for females. The per capita income for the town was $15,843. About 8.4% of families and 9.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.2% of those under age 18 and 8.8% of those age 65 or over.

General[edit]

Spencer, Indiana was named after a soldier, George Spencer, who fought in the Battle of Tippecanoe on November 7, 1811, and died on the battlefield after being shot three times. John Tipton, a Tippecanoe veteran and a commander of the Indiana Rangers, was given the honor of naming the town on February 12, 1820, as he writes in his journal: "the Citizens then gave me the honor of naming the new Town which I Called Spencer after my friend George Spencer who fell in the Battle of Tippicannoe."[10]

Owen County Courthouse, Spencer, Indiana

The Town of Spencer was laid out in 1820 and the first auction for lots took place.

The first court house was built of logs and replaced in 1825 with a brick courthouse. That courthouse stood until 1910 when the current courthouse was constructed to replace it. In 1890 a steam driven dynamo was installed in Spencer for carbon arc street lights. Spencer also recently passed Indianapolis as the town with the most married couples with children per capital in the state.

Owen Valley Community High School is located in Spencer with 980 students and more than 100 faculty members. Built in 1971, OVHS is the result of a consolidation of several smaller schools located within Owen County. Owen Valley's mascot is the Patriot, and the school's colors are red, white and blue. The school's yearbook is the Triad, Tri- meaning the three schools that were merged to make Owen Valley High School.

Each year, the Owen Valley High School prom is held in the varsity gym. The 2013 prom king was William Shelley, and the 2013 prom queen was Megan Eldridge.

Spencer is also the home of the Spencer PRIDE Festival, an annual event celebrating shared values of both LGBTQ and straight communities.

The Cinema 67 Drive-in theatre near Spencer, IN

Former British Prime Minister Harold Macmillan‘s mother was from Spencer.

Hickam[edit]

Horace Meek Hickam was a famous pilot for the United States in the earlier half of the 20th century. The son of a lawyer, Hickam was born in Spencer, the eldest of four children. Hickam's association with aviation began with the United States' entry into World War I. He was involved in the Mexican Punitive Expedition. By the end of his career, he had achieved the rank of Lieutenant Colonel and received a Silver Star. Colonel Hickam was killed in a landing accident at Fort Crockett, Galveston, Texas, on November 5, 1934. His fame as being a pioneering figure in aviation and aerospace science eventually led to the naming of the United States Air Force Base in Hawaii, "Hickam AFB" in his honor.[11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Places: Indiana". 2010 Census Gazetteer Files. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-04-21. 
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-12-11. 
  3. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-06-25. 
  4. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  5. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  7. ^ Blanchard, Charles (1884). Counties of Clay and Owen, Indiana: Historical and Biographical. F.A. Battey & Company. p. 665. 
  8. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  9. ^ Climate Summary for Spencer, Indiana
  10. ^ John Tipton, "Owen County Journal, 1820" The John Tipton Papers: Volume 1, 1809-1827, Indiana Historical Bureau, 1942. p. 183
  11. ^ "Horace Meek Hickam, Lieutenant Colonel, United States Army Air Corps". www.arlingtoncemetery.net. Retrieved 2009-01-09. 

External links[edit]