Spencer V. Jones

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Spencer V. Jones
Second Quorum of the Seventy
October 5, 2002 (2002-10-05) – October 2, 2010 (2010-10-02)
Called by Gordon B. Hinckley
End reason Honorably released
Personal details
Born Spencer Virgil Jones
(1945-09-17) September 17, 1945 (age 68)
Safford, Arizona, United States

Spencer Virgil Jones (born September 17, 1945 in Safford, Arizona) was a general authority and member of the Second Quorum of the Seventy of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) from 2002 to 2010.

Biography[edit]

Jones was raised in the largely Latter-day Saint town of Virden, New Mexico. He served an LDS mission in the church's Argentina North Mission. He studied at Eastern Arizona Junior College and the Church College of Hawaii before he received a bachelor's degree in Animal Science from Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah. He was a businessman and business owner for over 20 years in Gallup, New Mexico, involved in furniture retailing, manufactured housing, and ranching.

He is married to Joyce Elizabeth Mathews and they are the parents of three children.

Prior to becoming a general authority, he served in several positions in the LDS Church, including bishop, high councilor, mission president, and area authority seventy. From 2000 to 2002, he was an area authority seventy in the church's Caribbean Area, one of only a few to serve in an area where they had not previously lived. He served as president of the church's Chile Antofagasta Mission from 1994 to 1997.

Jones lived in Guatemala City from 2003 to 2007 while he served as president of the church's Central America Area from 2003 to 2007. During that time he presided at the groundbreaking of the Panamá City Panamá and Tegucigalpa Honduras temples.[1] He later served at church headquarters in Salt Lake City, Utah. In May 2010, he was called to serve as president of the church's New Mexico Farmington Mission, beginning in July 2010.[2] He was honorably released as a general authority at the church's general conference on October 2, 2010.[3]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.ldschurchtemples.com/tegucigalpa/
  2. ^ "New mission presidents", Church News, 2010-05-08.
  3. ^ Scott Taylor (October 3, 2010). "Five Mormon Church leaders given emeritus status". Deseret News (Salt Lake City, Utah, USA). Retrieved 2010-10-03. 

References[edit]

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