Sport in Cardiff

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Cardiff City Stadium, the home ground of Cardiff City (association football)

Sport in Cardiff is dictated by, amongst other things, its position as the capital city of Wales, meaning that national home sporting fixtures are nearly always played in the city. All of Wales' multi-sports agencies and many of the country's sports governing bodies have their headquarters in Cardiff and the city's many top-quality venues have attracted world-famous sport events, sometimes unrelated to Cardiff or to Wales.

The city hosts numerous international sporting events, be it independently or on behalf of Wales or the United Kingdom. Rugby fans around the world have long been familiar with the Cardiff Arms Park and its successor the Millennium Stadium, a visible presence from in and around the city. Early this century, hundreds of thousands of English football and rugby league supporters visited Cardiff during the six years (from 2001 to 2006) it took to rebuild Wembley Stadium, as the FA Cup and Rugby League Challenge Cup finals (and several other competitions) were played at the Millennium Stadium. In 2009, Cardiff hosted the first Ashes cricket test, between England and Australia, to be held in Wales. Cardiff hosted eight football matches of the London 2012 Olympics[1] and was the training base for certain participating nations.

In 2008/09, 61% of Cardiff residents regularly participated in sport and active recreation, the highest percentage out of all 22 local authorities in Wales.[2]

Overview[edit]

Inside the Millennium Stadium

Cardiff plays host to many high-profile sporting events at a local, national and international level.[3][4] In recognition of the city's commitment to sport for all, Cardiff was awarded the title of European City of Sport 2009.[5] Organised sports have been held in the city since the early 19th century.[6] Cardiff Arms Park (Welsh: Parc yr Arfau Caerdydd), in central Cardiff, is among the world's most famous venues—being the scene of three Welsh Grand Slams in the 1970s (1971, 1976 and 1978) and six Five Nations titles in nine years—and was the venue for Wales' games in the 1991 Rugby World Cup.[7][8][9][10] The Arms Park has a sporting history dating back to at least the 1850s, when Cardiff Cricket Club (formed 1819) relocated to the site.[6] The ground was donated to Cardiff CC in 1867 by the Marquess of Bute. Cardiff Cricket Club shared the ground with Cardiff Rugby Football Club (founded 1876)—forming Cardiff Athletic Club between them—until 1966, when the cricket section moved to Sophia Gardens. Cardiff Athletic Club and the Welsh Rugby Union established two stadia on the site—Cardiff RFC played at their stadium at the northern end of the site, and the Wales national rugby union team played international matches at the National Stadium, Cardiff Arms Park, which opened in 1970. The National Stadium was replaced by the 74,500 capacity Millennium Stadium (Welsh: Stadiwm y Mileniwm) in 1999—in time for the 1999 Rugby World Cup—and is home stadium to the Wales national rugby and football teams for international matches.[6][7][11][12] In addition to Wales' Six Nations Championship and other international games, the Millennium Stadium held four matches in the 2007 Rugby World Cup and six FA Cup finals (from the 2000–01 to 2005–06 seasons) while Wembley Stadium was being rebuilt.[8]

Multi-sport organisations[edit]

Sport Wales (Chwaraeon Cymru), the Welsh Sports Association (Gwasanaeth Chwaraeon Cymru) and the Federation of Disability Sport Wales (Chwaraeon Anabledd Cymru), the country's multi-sport agencies, are based at the Sport Wales National Centre, Sophia Gardens.

Sport Wales is responsible for developing and promoting sport and active lifestyles in Wales. It was established in 1972 with the objectives of "fostering the knowledge and practice of sport and physical recreation among the public at large in Wales and the provision of facilities thereto". Sport Wales is the Welsh Assembly Government's main adviser on sporting matters and is responsible for distributing National Lottery awards to sports in Wales.[13][14]

The Welsh Sports Association (WSA) (established 1972) is an independent, umbrella body, supporting and representing the national and international interests of all the national governing bodies (NGBs) of sport and physical recreation in Wales. It has a membership of over 60 NGBs. The WSA acts as an independent consultative body to the Welsh Assembly Government, Sport Wales and to UK Sport.[15][16][17]

The Federation of Disability Sport Wales is the national pan-disability governing body of sports organisations that provide local sporting and physical activity opportunities to disabled people in Wales.[18]

Cardiff Athletic Club is a multi-sport club and owns the Cardiff Arms Park site.[19] It was established in 1922, and has been the main body responsible for much of the premier amateur sporting activities in Cardiff. The Athletic Club has cricket (Cardiff Cricket Club), rugby union (Cardiff RFC), field hockey (Cardiff Hockey Club), tennis (Lisvane Tennis Club) and bowls (Cardiff Athletic Bowls Club) sections.

Team sports[edit]

Baseball[edit]

Cardiff is one of the centres of British baseball and hosts the annual Wales vs England international game every other year, usually at Roath Park, although the 2008 game – marking the centenary of the fixture between the two countries – was held in Llanrumney. Wales won the encounter again, having not lost to England, home or away, since 1995.[20][21]

Welsh Baseball Union (WBU) – formed 1892 – the governing body of men's British baseball in Wales, is based in Heath, Cardiff.[22][23][24]

Welsh Ladies Baseball Union (WLBU), the governing body of women's British baseball in Wales, is based in Grangetown, Cardiff. It was formed in 2006 when the WLBU decided to break away from the men's WBU.[25]

Basketball[edit]

The Cardiff Celts basketball team (formed 1964) compete in the English Basketball League, Division 1. The Celts play their home games at the Sport Wales National Centre.[26][27]

Basketball Wales (Pêl-fasged Cymru), the sole controller and the governing body of all aspects of the game of basketball in Wales, is based at the Sport Wales National Centre, Sophia Gardens. It is responsible for the management of the Welsh National Basketball League, the national teams and for the organisation of all national and international basketball competitions held in Wales.[22][28][29][30]

Cricket[edit]

The first test of the 2009 Ashes series at the SWALEC Stadium

Cricket has been played in Cardiff since at least the early 19th century and the city's first cricket club was formed in 1819. Cardiff Cricket Club, and the clubs they played—their fixture list included teams from south Wales and the west of England—were originally considered as 'gentlemen's clubs'. As the city grew, working class players formed their own clubs and, by 1885, Cardiff had 65 cricket teams.[6] Cardiff Cricket Club, whose first XI now play in the South Wales Cricket League – Premier Division, field a further 12 sides, including 'Midweek' and 'Sunday Friendly' XIs.[31][32]

In the north west of the county, Clwb Criced Creigiau Cricket Club, whose first XI plays in the South Wales Cricket League, field another 16 sides, from Juniors to Veterans.[33][34] Lisvane CC, the only club in the east of Cardiff, plays at Llwynarthen Cricket Ground and has the largest youth section in Cardiff.[35]

Glamorgan County Cricket Club (Criced Morgannwg), the Welsh first class, professional club, played their first county match – against Monmouthshire – in 1869, and played many regular county and exhibition matches at the Arms Park, including a game against a West Gloucestershire XI that included both G. F. and W. G. Grace.

The pavilion at the SWALEC Stadium

Glamorgan CCC play in the England and Wales Cricket Board County Championship and have competed as a first class county since 1921. Their headquarters and ground is the SWALEC Stadium, Sophia Gardens, since moving from Cardiff Arms Park in 1966. The club, which has over 7000 members, also runs the Welsh Cricket Academy. The Sophia Gardens stadium underwent a multi-million pound improvement since being selected to host the first ‘England’ v Australia Test Match of the 2009 Ashes series.[6][36][37][38]

As well as running club sides, three South Wales universities—Cardiff University, UWIC and the (Pontypridd, Rhondda Cynon Taf based) University of Glamorgan— formed the Cardiff/Glamorgan Centre of Cricketing Excellence, one of six Centres of Cricketing Excellence established by the England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB) in October 2000. The centres are aimed at male students with the potential to play first class cricket, and at female students who have played to senior county level. The Centre's day to day operations are at UWIC and their home matches are played at grounds used by Glamorgan CCC, including Sophia Gardens.[39]

The Cricket Board of Wales (Bwrdd Criced Cymru) (CBW) – an umbrella partnership body comprising the Welsh Cricket Association, Glamorgan Cricket, Wales Minor Counties, the Welsh Schools Cricket Association and Sport Wales – is based at the SWALEC Stadium. It regulates the sport of cricket in Wales and organises competitions up to national level.[22][40]

The Welsh Asians Cricket Club is based in Grangetown, Cardiff.[41]

The Welsh Cricket Academy (Academi Criced Cymru), run by Glamorgan Cricket, is based at the SWALEC Stadium.[40]

The Welsh Cricket Association (Cymdeithas Criced Cymru) (WCA) (founded 1969), the governing body of Welsh amateur cricket, is based at the SWALEC Stadium. It also runs the Welsh Cup and convenes the Welsh Coaching Forum. The WCA aims to promote, encourage, and improve amateur cricket in Wales, and to encourage and develop active participation in the game. Over 270 counties, associations, leagues and clubs are affiliated to the WCA.[40][42][43][44]

The Welsh Clubs Cricket Conference is based in Llanishen.[41]

Football[edit]

The official opening match of the Cardiff City Stadium between Cardiff City and Celtic

Cardiff City F.C. (founded 1899 as Riverside FC) played their home games at Ninian Park from 1910 until the end of the 2008–09 season. The Bluebirds' (as Cardiff City are known) new home is the Cardiff City Stadium, which they share with Cardiff Blues. Cardiff City have played in the English Football League since the 1920–21 season, climbing to Division 1 after one season.[45][46][47] Cardiff City are the only non-English team to have won The Football Association Challenge Cup, beating Arsenal in the 1927 final at Wembley Stadium.[47] The Bluebirds were runners up to Portsmouth in the 2008 final, losing 1–0 at the new Wembley Stadium.[48] Cardiff City currently play in the Premier League, the highest division overall in the English football league system.[49] Cardiff has numerous smaller clubs including Grange Harlequins A.F.C., UWIC Inter Cardiff F.C., Cardiff Corinthians F.C. and Ely Rangers A.F.C. who all play in the Welsh football league system.[50]

Gôl is Wales' first purpose built 5 a side football centre. Based in Canton, there are ten floodlit outdoor 5-a-side courts and one 7-a-side pitch, all using artificial 'Soccer turf'—designed to play and feel like grass.[51][52]

Six FA Cup finals were held at the Millennium Stadium (from the 2000–01 to 2005–06 seasons) while Wembley Stadium was being rebuilt.[8]

The Football Association of Wales (Cymdeithas Bêl-droed Cymru) (FAW), based at East Moors, Cardiff Bay, is the third oldest football association in the world. It has been the governing body of football in Wales since its formation in 1876. The FAW is one of the five associations—the others are FIFA, the English FA, the Scottish FA and the Irish FA—that make up a body called the International Football Association Board (IFAB). The IFAB maintain the laws that govern football, known officially as the "Laws of the Game".[53][54]

Hockey[edit]

Cardiff & UWIC Hockey Club (founded 1896 as Roath Hockey Club), based at the Wales international water-base pitch, Sophia Gardens, field six men's and two ladies teams, as well as men's BUSA and youth teams. The men's first team compete in Premier Division 1 of the West of England & South Wales Hockey League and the ladies' firsts in Premier Division 1 of the South Wales Hockey League.[55][56][57][58]

Renamed Cardiff Hockey Club by 1897, the club played their home games at Roath Park originally, but had moved to Llandaff Fields, Pontcanna and/or the Whitchurch Polo Fields by the 1903–04 season, where they stayed until club activities ceased in 1939. With no active hockey club in Cardiff, Cardiff Athletic Club decided to form a hockey section in 1945, as "part of its post-war reconstruction plans" and took over Cardiff Hockey Club. The ladies hockey club formed as Cardiff United in 1920, becoming part of Cardiff Athletic Club in 1927, playing as Cardiff Athletic Ladies HC. The ladies section also disbanded in 1939 and was not reformed until 1985.[55]

The Welsh Hockey Union (Undeb Hoci Cymru) (WHU), the national governing body for hockey in Wales, is based in Ely. It was established in 1996 by the merger of the Welsh Hockey Association (founded 1896) and the Welsh Women's Hockey Association (founded 1897). The WHU is responsible for the administration of all aspects of the game including clubs, competitions, development, internationals, schools, umpiring and universities. Competitions include men's and women's Welsh Cups, and internationals such as the Eurohockey Nations Trophy (ENT), held in Wrexham in August 2009. As well as Wales, countries competing at the ENT were Belarus, Czech Republic, Ireland, Italy, Russia, Scotland and Switzerland.[22][59][60][61]

Ice Hockey[edit]

Cardiff Arena,
the temporary home of Cardiff Devils
Main article: Cardiff Devils

The city's professional ice-hockey team, the Cardiff Devils (formed 1986), play against teams from across the UK in the Elite Ice Hockey League. The Devils played in the British Hockey League from 1987 to 1996, gaining promotion in two consecutive seasons—from Division 1 North, through Division 1—and remaining in the Premier division from the 1989–90 season, until the league's demise at the end of the 1995–96 season.[62] The Cardiff Devils played in the British Ice Hockey Superleague (BIHL) (known as the Sekonda Ice Hockey Superleague from 1998–99 due to sponsorship rights)—the top-level professional ice hockey league in the United Kingdom—between the 1995–96 season and 2000–01 season, when they were relegated to the British National League (BNL).[63] Cardiff played in the (BNL) for two seasons before being promoted to the Elite Ice Hockey League at the end of the 2002–03 season, where they remain.[64][65] The Devils' home venue moved from the Wales National Ice Rink to the Cardiff Arena in 2006, their temporary home in Cardiff Bay.[66]

Netball[edit]

The Cardiff based Celtic Dragons are part of the Co-operative Netball Superleague, which consists of the top nine netball teams in Wales, Scotland and England. Superleague teams members include international players from around the world. The teams compete against each other each week during the season, which runs from November to June. Seven of the 'Dragon's' nine home Superleague games are played at the Sport Wales National Centre, Sophia Gardens, with the others held at Glyndŵr University, Wrexham and at Cwmbran Stadium.[67][68]

The Cardiff & District Netball League has six divisions. All league games are played at the Sport Wales National Centre.[69]

The Welsh Netball Association (Cymdeithas Bêl-Rwyd Cymru) (founded 1945) (WNA) is the governing body for netball in Wales. The WNA is responsible for national championships, Welsh squad selection, international matches, the training and development of players, coaches and umpires and for the Sport Wales National Centre Netball Academy.[22][70][71]

International competitions in which Wales compete include the European Championships, the Commonwealth Games and the Netball World Championships. Wales were European Champions in 2001. The World Youth Netball Championship was held in Cardiff in July 2000.

The Welsh Netball Association was a founder member of the International Federation of Netball Associations (IFNA)—which governs world netball—in 1960. Netball is played in over fifty countries. Wales' current IFNA world ranking is 16th (last updated 28 May 2009).[72] The Welsh Netball Association is based in Pontcanna, Cardiff.[73]

Rugby[edit]

Main article: Rugby in Cardiff
The Cardiff Blues during their win against Gloucester in the final of the 2008-09 EDF Energy Cup

The Cardiff Blues (Welsh: Gleision Caerdydd)—one of Wales' four professional, regional, rugby union teams—compete in the Celtic League (this league has included teams from the Celtic nations of Ireland, Scotland and Wales from its inception, and added teams from Italy in 2010), the European Heineken Cup and the Anglo-Welsh LV= Cup, which they won in the 2008–09 season.[36][74] The region played their home games at Cardiff Arms Park from their formation in 2003 until the end of the 2008–09 season, although some of their bigger games have been played at the Millennium Stadium. Cardiff Blues' new home is the Cardiff City Stadium, which they share with Cardiff City F.C.[45]

Two of Cardiff's rugby union club sides play in the Welsh Premier Division: Cardiff RFC, founded in 1876, will continue to play their games at their Cardiff Arms Park stadium; and Glamorgan Wanderers RFC (founded 1893) play in the western Cardiff suburb of Ely.[75] Other Cardiff based rugby union teams include UWIC RFC, (who play in WRU Division One East) and the WRU Division Three South East teams of Llandaff North RFC, Llanishen RFC and St. Peters RFC and WRU Division Five teams of St. Albans RFC and St. Joseph's RFC.

Cardiff's rugby league team, the Cardiff Demons, play at St. Albans RFC's ground in Tremorfa, in the Rugby League Conference Welsh Premier league.

Three Rugby Football League Challenge Cup finals were held at the Millennium Stadium (from the 2002–03 to 2004–05 seasons) while Wembley Stadium was being rebuilt.[8] The other venues used, before the Challenge Cup final returned to Wembley, were Twickenham and Murrayfield.

Volleyball[edit]

Cardiff counts several volleyball clubs, including Cardiff Celts Volleyball Club.

Individual sports[edit]

Athletics[edit]

Cardiff Amateur Athletic Club (Cardiff AAC) (formed 1882 as Roath (Cardiff) Harriers) is based at the Cardiff International Sports Stadium, Leckwith. Roath Harriers shared Maindy Stadium with Birchgrove Harriers from its opening in 1951 and the two clubs amalgamated to form Cardiff Amateur Athletic Club in 1968. Cardiff AAC were British Athletics League champions in 1973, 1974 and 1975 and remain one of the top twelve clubs in Britain.[4][76][77] The club is made up of five sections, each specialising in a separate sport: track and field; road running; cross country; mountain running; and road walking.[76] Cardiff AAC athletes have won a total of 122 medals at major international championships: Olympic and Paralympic Games; World and European Championships; Commonwealth Games; and the World University Games.[78]

Former and current Cardiff AAC athletes include: Lynn Davies (Lynn the Leap) (1964 Olympic Games gold medalist); Colin Jackson (1993 and 1999 World Championship gold medalist and 1988 Olympic Games silver medalist); Tanni Grey-Thompson (winner of 11 Olympic gold medals); Nigel Walker; Jamie Baulch (1996 Olympic Games and 2002 Commonwealth Games silver medalist and 1998 Commonwealth Games bronze medalist); Christian Malcolm (1998 Commonwealth Games silver medalist); and Matt Elias (1998 Commonwealth Games bronze medalist and 2002 Commonwealth Games silver medalist).[78][79][80]

Cardiff Harlequins Running Club provide road running, cross country and mountain running sections. Harlequins have no track and field section.[81]

The Cardiff Half Marathon takes place in the city annually in October, attracting up to 11,000 participants and 20,000 spectators.[82] The organiser's goal is to have 20,000 participants by 2012.[82] The event was granted Championship status by Welsh Athletics for the first time in 2009.[83] Cardiff is also one of the cities chosen by several charities for sponsored runs such as Sport Relief, British Heart Foundation and Cancer Research UK.[84][85][86]

Welsh Athletics (Athletau Cymru), the national governing body for athletics, has been based at the Cardiff International Sports Stadium since 2009, having been based at the Cardiff Athletics Stadium until the stadium was demolished in 2007.[22][87]

Bowls[edit]

Cardiff Athletics Bowls Club

For administrative purposes, and for competitions immediately below national level in Wales, bowls (or bowling) is divided into counties. The South Glamorgan County Bowling Association (SGCBA) division follows the name of the preserved county of Wales that existed between 1972 and 1996. The SGCBA comprises 44 clubs, of which 30 are in the modern Cardiff county. The SGCBA play their home games at either Penylan, or at Llanbradach (in the modern Caerphilly County Borough). Bowling clubs are found throughout Cardiff. From clubs in the heart of the city, like the Cardiff Athletics Bowls Club at Cardiff Arms Park, to those in the western and northern rural areas like the St Fagans Bowls Club and the Pentyrch Bowling Club.[88][89][90]

The Cardiff Indoor Bowling Club (founded 1984), affiliated to the Welsh Indoor Bowling Association (WIBA) and the Welsh Ladies Indoor Bowling Association, is at Sophia Gardens.[91] The Cardiff club play in the Premier Division of the WIBA League and were WIBA club champions in the 2008/09 season, with a remarkable played 14, won 14 record.[92] Cardiff's Jeff Webley won the Welsh Indoor Bowls title in 2001.[93]

The Welsh Bowling Association (WBA), the governing body for men's outdoor bowling clubs in Wales, is based at Llanishen. It has 10 affiliated counties and 286 affiliated clubs. The WBA organise competitions, including the county championship, and select and manage the national side. At the 2009 Atlantic Rim Championship in Johannesburg, the Welsh men's team finished third.[22][94][95][96][97]

Boxing[edit]

Cardiff has a long association with boxing, from 'Peerless' Jim Driscoll – born in Cardiff in 1880 – to more recent, high profile fights staged in the city.[98] These include the WBC Lennox Lewis vs. Frank Bruno heavyweight championship fight at the Arms Park in 1993, and many of Joe Calzaghe's fights, between 2003 and 2007, including his victories over Mikkel Kessler – in the super middleweight reunification bout at the Millennium Stadium, Calzaghe retaining his WBO title and winning the WBA and WBC world titles from Kessler – and over Juan Carlos Giménez Ferreyra—retaining his WBO title at Cardiff Castle[12][99]

The British Boxing Board of Control, the governing body of professional boxing in the United Kingdom, has its head office at The Old Library, Cardiff.[100]

Cycling[edit]

The main cycling clubs in Cardiff are Cardiff Ajax CC, Cardiff JIF and Maindy Flyers Youth Cycling Club, all of which share the cycle track and facilities at the Maindy Centre. The clubs are administered by Welsh Cycling-Beicio Cymru and cover all the usual disciplines – BMX; cyclo-cross; mountain biking (downhill and cross-country); road racing; time trials; track racing; and leisure cycling.

Cardiff Ajax CC (founded 1948), named after the Greek god (Ajax), spans almost all the cycling disciplines. The club has strong links with the Maindy Flyers.[101][102] Former club riders include Reg Braddick (1944 British National Road Race Champion), Sally Hodge (1988 UCI Track Cycling World Champion), Katie Curtis (2007 Welsh National Road Race Champion) and Nicole Cooke (2008 Beijing Olympic gold medalist, Word Cup winner 2003 and 2006, ten times British National Road Race Champion, and 2002 Commonwealth Games gold medalist).[102][103][104][105][106]

The Cardiff JIF – standing for 'Just in Front' – cycling club is involved in road, track, cross and mountain bike racing.[107] Former club riders include Geraint Thomas (2008 Beijing Olympic gold medalist) and Ian Jeremiah (Welsh cross-country Champion).[108][109][110]

Maindy Flyers (founded 1995) are a youth cycling club, open to those aged between five and sixteen years old. In addition to racing bikes on a track, the club also organise mountain biking and cyclo-cross.[111] Former club riders include Geraint Thomas, a club member before joining Cardiff JIF, Luke Rowe and Matthew Rowe.[112][113]

A large number of Spokes Cycle Touring Club's 70 members are based in Cardiff. The club organises day, weekend, week and venture rides, around the UK and in Europe.[114]

Cycling is permitted in many of Cardiff's parks and green spaces and there are designated cycle routes throughout the county. One of the main routes in Cardiff linking to the rest of the Welsh cycle network is the Taff Trail (Taith Taf). The trail is a mainly off-road cycle and foot path that follows the Taff valley (Cwm Taf), much of it along the riverbank, between Mermaid Quay, Cardiff Bay in the south, and the market town of Brecon in the north. The Taff Trail leaves Cardiff County just north west of Tongwynlais, where it enters Rhondda Cynon Taf. The trail, 55 miles (89 km) long, is part of the 250 miles (400 km) Lôn Las Cymru cycle route, running from Holyhead to Cardiff and Chepstow – Route 8 of the National Cycle Network.[115][116]

Fencing[edit]

Cardiff Fencing Club, based at the Sport Wales National Centre, Sophia Gardens, is the oldest fencing club in Wales. It is affiliated to Welsh Fencing and British Fencing. The club train students at épée, sabre and foil.[117]

Russell Swords Fencing Club also meets in Cardiff at the Star Centre, Splott, and trains students in all three weapons.[118]

Welsh Fencing, the governing body of fencing in Wales, is based in Canton, Cardiff. In 2003 it had 34 affiliated clubs, 260 adult and 559 junior members. Welsh Fencing organises competitions including the Welsh Open. Welsh Fencing are responsible for the selection and management of the Wales representative squad, who compete in the Winton Cup and the Commonwealth Games. To compete at the European and World Championships Welsh fencers represent Great Britain, if selected.[22][119][120][121][122][123]

Golf[edit]

Cardiff has several golf courses, including:

Cardiff Golf Club (founded 1922) opened the first 18 hole golf course in Cardiff in 1923, in Cyncoed. The course is 6,099 yards (5,577 m), well bunkered, and set in parkland. A new clubhouse was completed in 1998 and officially opened by John Roger Jones, President of the Welsh Golfing Union, in 1999.[124][125][126]

Castell Coch Golf Club has a nine hole, par three, 1,200 yards (1,100 m), pitch and putt course in Tongwynlais, opened in 1988.[127][128][129]

Creigiau Golf Club has an 18 hole, 6,063 yards (5,544 m), parkland course. The course is flat, allowing easy walking, with plenty of water hazards.[130][131]

Llanishen Golf Club has an 18 hole, 5,301 yards (4,847 m), parkland course, built in 1995.[132]

Radyr Golf Club (established 1902) has an 18 hole, 6,010 yards (5,500 m), public course, built by Harry Colt.[133][134]

St Mellons Golf Club has an 18 hole 6,275 yards (5,738 m), parkland course in St Mellons (first opened in 1936), laid out in the shape of a clover leaf. Part of the course is in Cardiff and part in Newport and, as the clubhouse is in Newport, the club is affiliated to the Gwent Golfing Union. [135][136]

Whitchurch (Cardiff) Golf Club has an 18 hole, parkland, 6,258 yards (5,722 m), public course, built in 1914. The course was voted Best Inland Golf Course in Wales, in a survey by Welsh Club Golfer Magazine, in November 2008.[137][138]

Gymnastics[edit]

Cardiff Olympic Gymnastics Club, founded in 1948 as a ladies artistic gymnastics club, opened a boys section in September 1999. It is the oldest established and 'most senior' ladies artistic gymnastics club in Wales. The club, based in Grangetown, has over 400 members. The Girls Gymnastics section compete on four pieces of apparatus: asymmetric bars; beam; floor; and vault. The Boys Gymnastics section compete on six pieces: floor; vault; pommel horse; still rings; parallel bars; and high bar.[139][140]

Welsh Gymnastics (founded 1902 as the Welsh Amateur Gymnastics Association), based at the Sport Wales National Centre, is the national governing body for gymnastics in Wales. It has overall responsibility for the administration of all eight gymnastics disciplines in Wales – women's artistic, men's artistic and rhythmic gymnastics, general gymnastics, sports acrobatics, sports aerobics, trampolining and tumbling – through its four geographical areas (north, south, east and west), which are responsible for their own area competition and squad training sessions. Welsh Gymnastics organises the Welsh national and international teams and competitions.[22][141][142]

Horse Racing[edit]

Ely Racecourse was a major horse racing venue in Ely, Cardiff, pulling in crowds of 40,000 or more for events such as the Welsh Grand National – first held at Ely in 1895. Ely Racecourse closed on 27 April 1939, the last race being won by Keith Piggott (father of Lester) on Dunbarney.[143]

Judo[edit]

Cardiff has five judo clubs affiliated to the Welsh Judo Association: Honto Judo, based at the Heath (Y Mynydd Bychan); Ty-Celyn Judo Club, based at Cardiff High School, Cyncoed; WISP Sogo Judokai, based at Penylan; Kings Monkton Judokai, based at Kings Monkton School, West Grove, Roath (Y Rath); and D S Judo Centre, based at Radyr.[144][145][146]

The Welsh Judo Association (Cymdeithas Judo Cymru) (WJA), based at the Sport Wales National Centre, Sophia Gardens, is the governing body for judo in Wales. The WJA is responsible for managing the Welsh High Class Performance Squads, from which the National Coach – double judo Olympic silver medallist Neil Adams – selects the Welsh national team to compete at international events.[22][147][148]

Rowing[edit]

Returning from World War II, members of the Taff Rowing Club (founded 1879) and Cardiff Rowing Club (founded 1884) discovered their clubhouses to have collapsed and burned out. The two clubs amagamalted to form the Llandaff Rowing Club, based on the River Taff, at Llandaff, in 1946. After retoration work to boats and clubhouse, the club's first regatta was held in 1947. Club members have been medal winners at the 1962 Empire Games in Australia and the 1980 Moscow Olympics. The club has a course of 1,200 metres (3,937 ft) of calm water on the River Taff. Llandaff Rowing Club is affiliated to the Welsh Amateur Rowing Association (WARA).[149]

Cardiff City Rowing Club (CCRC) is based at Cardiff Yacht Club on Cardiff Bay and is also affiliated to (WARA). Founded in 2004 by ex-Welsh squad rowers, CCRC has easy access to mile after mile of flat water, including the Rivers Ely and Taff – with access to the stretch of water up to Sophia Gardens, past Cardiff Castle and the Millennium Stadium – back to the whole of Cardiff Bay and the club's multilane rowing course there. Funding by Sport Wales has enabled CCRC to develop its facilities, boat fleet and local community rowing.[150]

The Welsh Amateur Rowing Association (Rhwyfo Cymru) (WARA), based at Thornhill, is the national governing body for rowing in Wales. It is responsible for the organisation of all national rowing competitions held in Wales, including the 'Head of the Taff' and the Welsh Open Rowing Championships, and for the selection and management of the Welsh national rowing teams and the organisation of all international rowing competitions held in Wales. It has 13 affiliated clubs, including schools and universities.[151][152][153][154][155][156]

Sailing[edit]

Cardiff Yacht Club, water side

Cardiff is host to two Yacht Clubs:

  • Cardiff Yacht Club (CYC) (founded 1900) has a clubhouse in Butetown, Cardiff Bay, complete with moorings, a pontoon system and a slipway for launching dinghies. CYC organise events, including yachting, dinghy sailing, dragon boat race, fishing and angling competitions, in the freshwater Cardiff Bay, in the Severn and on the 'high seas'.
Tuition at Cardiff Sailing Centre

Royal Yachting Association recognised training is provided through a number of Training establishments around the city, with the notable ones being:

Shooting[edit]

The Welsh Target Shooting Federation (Ffederasiwn Saethu Targedau Cymru) (WTSF), based in Cardiff, is the governing body for shooting sports in Wales. It represents the member bodies of the WTSF—the Welsh Airgun Association (WAA), the Welsh Clay Target Shooting Association (WCTSA), the Welsh Rifle Association (WRA) and the Welsh Small-bore Rifle Association (WSRA)—by promoting and developing shooting sports in Wales.[159][160][161] Cardiff Rifle Club (primarily a .22 smallbore rifle club) is also based in the Roath/Cathays area of the city.

Skiing[edit]

The Ski & Snowboard Centre Cardiff, Fairwater – managed by Snowsport Cymru/Wales – consists of a floodlit 100 metres (328 ft) dry ski slope, with an overhead poma ski lift and lubrication roller, to ensure good skiing and snowboarding conditions—even in dry weather.[162]

Snowsport Cymru/Wales, based at the Cardiff Ski & Snowboard Centre, is the governing body of skiing and snowboarding in Wales. Its membership comprises individuals, schools, corporate sponsors and six affiliated clubs. Snowsport Cymru/Wales selects, organises and trains the Welsh National Ski Squad.[162][163][164]

Speedway[edit]

Grand Prix of Great Britain
at the Millennium Stadium

Speedway was staged at Cardiff's White City Greyhound Stadium from 1928 until World War II. The sport returned to the city in 1951, at a purpose built stadium in Penarth Road but the track closed mid season 1953. The team, known as the Cardiff Dragons, raced in the National League Division Three in 1951 and 1952 and in the Southern League in 1953. Speedway returned to the city in 2001, when the British Speedway Grand Prix, one of the World Championship events, moved into the Millennium Stadium.[12] While the track—a temporary, purpose built, shale oval—is not universally loved, the venue is considered the best of the World Championship's 11 rounds.[165]

Swimming[edit]

The Wales Empire Swimming Pool was demolished in 1998 to make way for the Millennium Stadium. The replacement pool, the Cardiff International Pool was opened on 12 January 2008 in Grangetown as part of the International Sports Village. The complex features a 50-metre Olympic standard pool and an indoor water park. In addition, 25-metre swimming pools are located in seven city leisure centres.

Triathlon[edit]

Cardiff has two triathlon clubs. One senior, one junior club: (1) Cardiff Triathletes, based at Fairwater Leisure Centre – affiliated to British Triathlon, Welsh Triathlon and the Road Time Trials Council (for cycling time trials) – (2) The junior and youth triathlon club is the Cardiff Junior Triathlon Club (Clwb Triathlon Ieuenctid Caerdydd), based at the Maindy Centre. Both senior and junior clubs participate in triathlon, duathlon and aquathlon events in South Wales and beyond. The Cardiff Junior Triathlon is held annually, in June.[166][167]

World Rally Championship[edit]

Motorsport events such as the Wales Rally GB, as part of the World Rally Championship are hosted by the Millennium Stadium. The first ever indoor special stages of the World Rally Championship were held at the Stadium in September 2005 and have been an annual event since then. However, the event scheduled to start on 22 October 2009 could be the last to be seen there, as the Welsh Assembly Government has withdrawn its funding, following the decision by Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile that Wales Rally GB would not have World Rally Championship qualifying status in 2010.[168]

Multi-sport and international events[edit]

British Empire and Commonwealth Games[edit]

The 1958 British Empire and Commonwealth Games – now called the Commonwealth Games – hosted by Cardiff, were held between 18 and 26 July 1958. The Games involved 1,130 athletes from 35 national teams competing in 94 events.[169]

The main stadium for the event was the National Stadium part of Cardiff Arms Park, which hosted the track and field events. The Wales Empire Swimming Pool, which also opened in 1958, hosted all the swimming and diving events. The Wales Empire Pool and the National Stadium were demolished in 1998 to make way for the Millennium Stadium. Of the venues used for the event, only the cycling track at Maindy Centre remains.[12][170]

London 2012 Olympics[edit]

Cardiff played a substantial role in the London 2012 Olympics, with the Millennium Stadium hosting some events. Venues in Cardiff used by athletes training for the Olympics included:[171]

Commonwealth Games 2022[edit]

Cardiff is planning to submit a bid to host the Commonwealth Games in 2022, having been the host city of the 1958 British Empire and Commonwealth Games.[172]

Sport venues in Cardiff[edit]

Further information: List of sport venues in Cardiff

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ BBC Sport | Cardiff to host Olympics football
  2. ^ Welsh Assembly Government | Local Area Summary Statistics p44
  3. ^ ref "Cardiff –The City". Cardiff University website. Cardiff University. 2 November 2007. Retrieved 2009-06-28. 
  4. ^ a b "Cardiff – Home, Sport Cardiff, Sport.Cardiff". Cardiff Council's website. Cardiff Council. 27 May 2009. Retrieved 2009-06-28. 
  5. ^ "Cardiff – Home, European City of Sport, European City of Sport 2009". Cardiff Council's website. Cardiff Council. 1 June 2009. Retrieved 2009-06-29. 
  6. ^ a b c d e "Cricinfo.com". ESPN Cricinfo website. ESPN EMEA Ltd. 6 January 2005. Retrieved 2009-06-26. 
  7. ^ a b "Cardiff RFC – CRFC History". Cardiff RFC website. Cardiff Rugby Football Club. 2 November 2007. Retrieved 2009-06-26. 
  8. ^ a b c d "RWC 2007 – The Millennium Stadium". 2007 RWCL website. RWCL. 2007. Retrieved 2009-06-27. 
  9. ^ "Cardiff or the pride of being Welsh!". ViaMichelin website. ViaMichelin SAS. 2009. Retrieved 2009-06-28. 
  10. ^ "Cardiff travel guide: Cardiff vacation ideas:Travel Channel". Travel Channel website. The Travel Channel L.L.C. 2009. Retrieved 2009-06-28. 
  11. ^ "Millennium Stadium:Information:About the Venue:Facts&Figures". Millennium Stadium website. Millennium Stadium plc. 2009. Retrieved 2009-06-25. 
  12. ^ a b c d "Millennium Stadium:Information:Stadium History:Stadium History". Millennium Stadium website. Millennium Stadium plc. 2009. Retrieved 2009-06-29. 
  13. ^ "Sport Wales – What we do". Sport Wales website. Sport Wales. 2011. Retrieved 19 March 2011. 
  14. ^ "Royal Charter" (doc). Sport Wales website. Sport Wales. 2011. Retrieved 19 March 2011. 
  15. ^ "introduction". Welsh Sports Association website. Welsh Sports Association. 2007. Retrieved 2009-07-11. 
  16. ^ "aims/objectives". Welsh Sports Association website. Welsh Sports Association. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-13. 
  17. ^ "contact info". Welsh Sports Association website. Welsh Sports Association. 2007. Retrieved 2009-07-23. 
  18. ^ "FDSW". Disability Sport Wales – Chwaraeon Anabledd Cymru website. FDSW. 2007. Retrieved 2009-07-11. 
  19. ^ "CRFC History". www.cardiffrfc.co.uk. Archived from the original on 14 May 2008. Retrieved 2008-05-16. 
  20. ^ "BBC South East Wales Sport – Baseball". BBC South East Wales. BBC. 30 August 2006. Retrieved 19 March 2011. 
  21. ^ "International baseball". Welsh Baseball website. Welsh Baseball. 2009. Retrieved 2009-06-28. 
  22. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "NGB Websites". Sport Wales website. Sport Wales. 2011. Retrieved 19 March 2011. 
  23. ^ "WalesOnline – Sport – Grassroots – Rhondda – Baseball:Rhondda sponsor for Wel". WalesOnline website. Welsh Media Ltd. 9 April 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-11. 
  24. ^ "Weltch Media contact Weltch Media in Cardiff". WalesOnline website. Weltch Media Ltd. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-11. 
  25. ^ "WLBU". WLBU website. WLBU. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-11. 
  26. ^ "Celts Basketball – About Us". Celts Basketball. 2008. Retrieved 2009-06-27work=Celts Basketball website. 
  27. ^ "Celts Basketball – News – Celts Find New Home at WIS". Celts Basketball website. Celts Basketball. 2008. Retrieved 2009-06-27. [dead link]
  28. ^ "BAW – Basketball Association of Wales – Home". Basketball Wales website. Basketball Wales. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-13. 
  29. ^ "http://www.basketballwales.com/images/Constitution%20BAW%202004.pdf" (PDF). Basketball Wales website. Basketball Wales. 2004. Retrieved 2009-07-13. 
  30. ^ "BAW – Basketball Association of Wales – Contacts". Basketball Association of Wales Constitution. Basketball Wales. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-13. 
  31. ^ "Cardiff CC – Play-Cricket – Teams". Cardiff Cricket Club website. Cardiff Cricket Club. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-03. 
  32. ^ "Cardiff CC – Play-Cricket – Fixtures". Cardiff Cricket Club website. Cardiff Cricket Club. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-03. 
  33. ^ "Creigiau CC – Play-Cricket -". Clwb Criced Creigiau Cricket Clubwebsite. Clwb Criced Creigiau Cricket Club. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-03. 
  34. ^ "Creigiau CC – Play-Cricket – Teams". Clwb Criced Creigiau Cricket Clubwebsite. Clwb Criced Creigiau Cricket Club. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-03. 
  35. ^ "Cricket fever hits Cardiff – Sports Council for Wales". Sport Wales website. Sport Wales. 19 June 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-03. [dead link]
  36. ^ a b "WalesOnline – News – Wales News – What the Ashes could do for Cardiff". WalesOnline website. Media Wales Ltd. 17 June 2009. Retrieved 2009-06-26. 
  37. ^ "Welsh Cricket Association – Affiliated Bodies D – K". Welsh Cricket Association website. Welsh Cricket Association. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-13. 
  38. ^ "Glamorgan Cricket Club". Glamorgan Cricket website. Glamorgan Cricket. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-13. 
  39. ^ "Sport at UWIC". University of Wales Institute, Cardiff – Athrofa Prifysgol Cymru, Caerdydd Clubwebsite. University of Wales Institute, Cardiff – Athrofa Prifysgol Cymru, Caerdydd. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-03. [dead link]
  40. ^ a b c "WLBU". Cricket Board of Wales website. The Cricket Board of Wales. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-11. 
  41. ^ a b "Welsh Cricket Association – Affiliated Bodies S – Z". Welsh Cricket Association website. Welsh Cricket Association. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-13. 
  42. ^ "Welsh Cricket Association". Welsh Cricket Association website. Welsh Cricket Association. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-13. 
  43. ^ "Welsh Cricket Association – Constitution". Welsh Cricket Association website. Welsh Cricket Association. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-13. [dead link]
  44. ^ "Welsh Cricket Association – Affiliated Bodies". Welsh Cricket Association website. Welsh Cricket Association. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-13. 
  45. ^ a b "Cardiff Blues : Stadium News". Cardiff Blues website. Cardiff Blues. 24 June 2009. Retrieved 2009-06-26. [dead link]
  46. ^ "Cardiff City – Club – Club History – Club History – The Foundations and Early Y". Cardiff City FC website. Cardiff City Football Club & FL Interactive. 17 November 2004. Retrieved 2013-09-09. 
  47. ^ a b "Cardiff City – Club – Club History – Club History – The Roaring Twenties". Cardiff City FC website. Cardiff City Football Club & FL Interactive. 17 November 2004. Retrieved 2009-06-26. 
  48. ^ "Cardiff City – Club – Club History – Club History – Club Honours and History". Cardiff City Football Club & FL Interactive. 17 November 2004. Retrieved 2009-06-26. 
  49. ^ "BBC SPORT – Football-My Club-C-Cardiff". BBC News website (BBC). 26 June 2009. Retrieved 2009-06-26. 
  50. ^ "Directory of Clubs". Welsh League website. The Welsh Football League. 2009. Retrieved 2009-06-26. 
  51. ^ "Cardiff five a side football : 5 a side football in Cardiff – Gol Centres". Canolfannau Pêl-droed Gôl Football Centres website. Gol. 2009. Retrieved 2009-06-28. 
  52. ^ "The Pitches". Canolfannau Pêl-droed Gôl Football Centres website. Gol. 2009. Retrieved 2009-06-28. 
  53. ^ "About FAW – Football Association of Wales". Football Association of Wales-Cymdeithas Bel-droed Cymru website. Football Association of Wales. 2007. Retrieved 2009-07-11. 
  54. ^ "Association Football-Sports Council for Wales" (Word). Sport Wales Chwaraeon Cymru website. Sport Wales. 2007. Retrieved 2009-07-24. [dead link]
  55. ^ a b "History". Cardiff Hockey website. Cardiff Hockey. 2009. 
  56. ^ "Club Introduction". Cardiff Hockey website. Cardiff Hockey. 2009. 
  57. ^ "Mens 1sts Bio". Cardiff Hockey website. Cardiff Hockey. 2009. 
  58. ^ "Ladies 1sts Bio". Cardiff Hockey website. Cardiff Hockey. 2009. 
  59. ^ "WELSH HOCKEY UNION:UNDEB HOCI CYMRU". Welsh Hockey Union-Undeb Hoci Cymru website. Welsh Hockey Union. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-14. 
  60. ^ "WELSH HOCKEY UNION:UNDEB HOCI CYMRU". Welsh Hockey Union-Undeb Hoci Cymru website. Welsh Hockey Union. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-14. 
  61. ^ "WELSH HOCKEY UNION:UNDEB HOCI CYMRU". Welsh Hockey Union-Undeb Hoci Cymru website. Welsh Hockey Union. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-14. 
  62. ^ "http://www.hockeydb.com/ihdb/stats/display_standings.php?tmi=5147". hockeyDB.com website. hockeyDB.com. 2008. Retrieved 2009-07-05. 
  63. ^ "http://www.hockeydb.com/ihdb/stats/display_standings.php?tmi=5148". hockeyDB.com website. hockeyDB.com. 2008. Retrieved 2009-07-05. 
  64. ^ "http://www.hockeydb.com/ihdb/stats/display_standings.php?tmi=5149". hockeyDB.com website. hockeyDB.com. 2008. Retrieved 2009-07-05. 
  65. ^ "http://www.hockeydb.com/ihdb/stats/display_standings.php?tmi=5150". hockeyDB.com website. hockeyDB.com. 2008. Retrieved 2009-07-05. 
  66. ^ "BBC News:Wales:South East Wales:Cardiff temporary ice rink opens". BBC News website (BBC News). 1 December 2006. Retrieved 2009-07-05. 
  67. ^ "Welsh Netball Association – Celtic Dragons Need Volunteers". Welsh Netball Association website. Welsh Netball Association. 2009. Retrieved 2009-09-12. [dead link]
  68. ^ "Superleague Season 08/09". England Netball website. England Netball. 2009. Retrieved 2009-09-12. 
  69. ^ "About Cardiff Netball". Cardiff Netball website. Cardiff Netball. 2009. Retrieved 2009-09-12. 
  70. ^ "Welsh Netball Association – History". Welsh Netball Association-Cymdeithas Bêl-Rwyd Cymru website. Welsh Netball Association-Cymdeithas Bêl-Rwyd Cymru. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-15. [dead link]
  71. ^ "Welsh Netball Association – Eligibility & Selection Procedure". Welsh Netball Association-Cymdeithas Bêl-Rwyd Cymru website. Welsh Netball Association-Cymdeithas Bêl-Rwyd Cymru. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-15. [dead link]
  72. ^ "IFNA : Current World Rankings". =International Federation of Netball Associations website. IFNA. 28 May 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-15. 
  73. ^ "Welsh Netball Association – Home". Welsh Netball Association-Cymdeithas Bêl-Rwyd Cymru website. Welsh Netball Association-Cymdeithas Bêl-Rwyd Cymru. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-15. [dead link]
  74. ^ "Magners League: History:Season 2001–2002". Magners League website. Magners League. 26 June 2009. Retrieved 2009-06-26. 
  75. ^ Jenkins, Vivian (1981). Rothmans Rugby Yearbook 1981–82. Kidderminster: Lion Books. p. 368. ISBN 0-907574-05-X. 
  76. ^ a b "Cardiff AAC Club Page". Welsh Athletics Ltd website. Welsh Athletics Ltd. 2007. Retrieved 2009-07-04. [dead link]
  77. ^ "Welcome to Cardiff AAC :: History". Cardiff Amateur Athletic Club website. Cardiff Amateur Athletic Club. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-04. 
  78. ^ a b "Welcome to Cardiff AAC :: Roll of Honour – Gold (50)". Cardiff Amateur Athletic Club website. Cardiff Amateur Athletic Club. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-04. 
  79. ^ "Welcome to Cardiff AAC :: Roll of Honour – Silver (44)". Cardiff Amateur Athletic Club website. Cardiff Amateur Athletic Club. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-04. 
  80. ^ "Welcome to Cardiff AAC :: Roll of Honour – Bronze (28)". Cardiff Amateur Athletic Club website. Cardiff Amateur Athletic Club. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-04. 
  81. ^ "Cardiff Harlequins Club Page". Welsh Athletics Ltd website. Welsh Athletics Ltd. 2007. Retrieved 2009-07-04. [dead link]
  82. ^ a b "WalesOnline – Sports – Sports News – Cardiff Half Marathon goal is 20,000 runners". WalesOnline website. Welsh Media Ltd. 14 October 2009. Retrieved 2009-10-15. 
  83. ^ "Cardiff Half Marathon:October 2009:Marathon training in Wales:Charity even". Cardiff Half Marathon website. Cardiff Half Marathon. 7 September 2006. Retrieved 2009-07-07. 
  84. ^ "The Cardiff Mile:Sport Relief". Sport Relief website. Comic Relief. 2008. Retrieved 2009-07-09. [dead link]
  85. ^ "British Heart Foundation – View Event". British Heart Foundation website. British Heart Foundation. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-09. 
  86. ^ "Cancer Research UK – Cardiff Half Marathon 09". Cancer Research UK website. Cancer Research UK. 9 July 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-09. 
  87. ^ "Welsh Athletics – Contact Us". Welsh Athletics website. Welsh Athletics. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-11. [dead link]
  88. ^ "Cardiff Athletic Bowls Club". Cardiff Athletic Bowls Club website. Cardiff Athletic Bowls Club. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-10. 
  89. ^ "St Fagans Bowls Club". St Fagans Bowls Club website. St Fagans Bowls Club. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-10. [dead link]
  90. ^ "About Us". Pentyrch Bowling Club website. Pentyrch Bowling Club. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-10. 
  91. ^ "Affiliated Clubs". Welsh Ladies Indoor Bowls Association website. Welsh Ladies Indoor Bowls Association. 2008. Retrieved 2009-07-10. 
  92. ^ "www.welshindoorbowls.com". Welsh Indoor Bowls Association website. Welsh Indoor Bowls Association. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-10. 
  93. ^ "BBC Sport:Other sports:Webley takes Welsh title". BBC Sport website (BBC Sport). 28 January 2002. Retrieved 2009-07-10. 
  94. ^ "Welsh Bowling Association". Welsh Bowling Association website. Welsh Bowling Association. 2008. Retrieved 2009-07-13. 
  95. ^ "Welsh Bowling Association". Welsh Bowling Association website. Welsh Bowling Association. 2008. Retrieved 2009-07-13. 
  96. ^ "Overall Tables for Position". World Bowls website. World Bowls. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-13. 
  97. ^ "World Bowls – List of International Member Associations". World Bowls website. World Bowls. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-13. 
  98. ^ "Untitled Normal Page". Newtown Association website. Newtown Association. 2000. Retrieved 2009-06-28. 
  99. ^ BBC "BBC SPORT:Boxing:Calzaghe king of Cardiff". BBC Sport website (BBC). 17 August 2002. Retrieved 2009-06-28. 
  100. ^ "BBBofC – British Boxing Board of Control". British Boxing Board of Control website. British Boxing Board of Control. 2009. Retrieved 2009-09-08. 
  101. ^ "Cardiff Ajax Cycling Club – Home Page". Cardiff Ajax Cycling Club website. Mike Webb 2008 : MJW Designs : Cardiff Ajax Cycling Club. 4 July 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-05. 
  102. ^ a b "Cardiff Ajax Cycling Club – History". Cardiff Ajax Cycling Club website. Mike Webb 2008 : MJW Designs : Cardiff Ajax Cycling Club. 2008. Retrieved 2009-07-05. 
  103. ^ "nicolecooke.com". Nicole Cooke website. Nicole Cooke. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-05. 
  104. ^ "nicolecooke.com". Nicole Cooke website. Nicole Cooke. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-05. 
  105. ^ "Welsh Road Race Championships 2007". British Cycling website. British Cycling. 2009. Retrieved 2007-06-03. [dead link]
  106. ^ "British Cycling (WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS HONOURS LIST)". British Cycling website. British Cycling. 2009. Retrieved 2007-06-03. [dead link]
  107. ^ "Cardiff – Home". Cardiff Jif Cycling Club website. Cardiff Jif Cycling Club. 1 July 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-06. [dead link]
  108. ^ "WalesOnline – News – Wales News – CARDIFF cyclist Geraint Thomas added his name". WalesOnline website. Media Wales Ltd. 18 August 2008. Retrieved 2009-07-06. 
  109. ^ "Geraint Thomas Interview". British Cycling website. British Cycling. 3 September 2008. Retrieved 2009-07-06. [dead link]
  110. ^ "British Cycling / Search Results / Report:Welsh XC Championships". British Cycling website. British Cycling. 3 June 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-06. 
  111. ^ "Maindy Flyers – Cycling Club". Maindy Flyers Cycling Club website. Maindy Flyers Cycling Club. 2008. Retrieved 2009-07-05. 
  112. ^ "GB pursuit team set world record". BBC Sport. 17 August 2008. Retrieved 2010-01-04. 
  113. ^ "Maindy Flyers 'on Tour'!". Beicio Cymru Welsh Cycling website. British Cycling. 17 July 2007. Retrieved 2009-07-05. [dead link]
  114. ^ "Spokes Cycle Touring Club About Us". Spokes Cycle Touring Club website. Spokes Cycle Touring Club. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-05. 
  115. ^ "Cardiff – Home, Cycle routes in Cardiff". Cardiff Council website. Cardiff Council. 4 March 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-06. 
  116. ^ "Lon Las Cymru : Cycle Touring : Cycling". Visit Wales website. Welsh Assembly Government. 2008. Retrieved 2009-07-06. 
  117. ^ Cardiff Fencing Club website. Cardiff Fencing Club. 2014 http://www.cardifffencing.org/index.php/8-articles/1-about-us |url= missing title (help). Retrieved 2014-01-07. 
  118. ^ "Our clubs". Russell Swords Fencing Club website. Russell Swords Fencing Club. 2014. Retrieved 2014-01-06. 
  119. ^ "Club List". Welsh Fencing website. Welsh Fencing. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-22. 
  120. ^ "WelshOpenEntryForm2009.pdf (application/pdf Object" (PDF). Welsh Open Entry Form 2009. Welsh Fencing. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-22. [dead link]
  121. ^ "European & World Championships". Welsh Fencing website. Welsh Fencing. 4 April 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-22. 
  122. ^ "Senior Winton Cup 2009 Report". Welsh Fencing website. Welsh Fencing. 20 April 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-22. 
  123. ^ "Search-Sports Council for Wales" (word). Sport Wales Chwaraeon Cymru website. Sport Wales. 2007. Retrieved 2009-07-24. [dead link]
  124. ^ "Cardiff Golf Club". Cardiff Golf Club website. Cardiff Golf Club. 10 July 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-10. 
  125. ^ "Cardiff Golf Club". Cardiff Golf Club website. Cardiff Golf Club. 10 July 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-10. 
  126. ^ "Golf Courses in Wales. Search for a Welsh golf course". Visit Wales website. Welsh Assembly Government. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-11. 
  127. ^ "Castell Coch Golf Club, Tongwynlais, Cardiff, golf, golf courses". walescymru.com website. My City My Site Limited. 2007. Retrieved 2009-07-10. 
  128. ^ "WalesOnline – What's On – What's on News – 101 things to do over Easter". WalesOnline website. Media Wales Ltd. 24 March 2005. Retrieved 2009-07-10. 
  129. ^ "Golf Courses in Wales. Search for a Welsh golf course". Visit Wales website. Welsh Assembly Government. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-11. 
  130. ^ "Creigiau Golf Club, Cardiff". WorldGolf.com website. WorldGolf.com. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-11. 
  131. ^ "Golf Courses in Wales. Search for a Welsh golf course". Visit Wales website. Welsh Assembly Government. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-11. 
  132. ^ "Llanishen Golf Club, Cardiff". WorldGolf.com website. WorldGolf.com. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-11. 
  133. ^ "Radyr Golf Club: Golf Club and Golf Course in Cardiff,. www.radyrgolf.co.uk". Radyr Golf Club website. Radyr Golf Club. 2008. Retrieved 2009-07-11. 
  134. ^ "Radyr Golf Club, Cardiff". WorldGolf.com website. WorldGolf.com. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-11. 
  135. ^ "St Mellons Golf Club – golfing in Cardiff, South Wales". St Mellons Golf Club website. St Mellons Golf Club. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-10. [dead link]
  136. ^ "Golf Courses in Wales. Search for a Welsh golf course". Visit Wales website. Welsh Assembly Government. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-11. 
  137. ^ "Whitchurch (Cardiff) Golf Club, Cardiff". WorldGolf.com website. WorldGolf.com. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-11. 
  138. ^ "Whitchurch (Cardiff) Golf Club, Cardiff". Whitchurch (Cardiff) Golf Club website. Whitchurch (Cardiff) Golf Club. 11 July 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-11. 
  139. ^ "Cardiff Olympic Gymnastics". Cardiff Olympic Gymnastics website. Cardiff Olympic Gymnastics. 2009. Retrieved 2009-09-09. 
  140. ^ "Cardiff Olympic Gymnastics-Boys Gymnastics". Cardiff Olympic Gymnastics website. Cardiff Olympic Gymnastics. 2009. Retrieved 2009-09-09. 
  141. ^ "http://www.welshgymnastics.org/content/resourcelibrary/downloads/Em13452WG%20Bu" (PDF). Welsh Gymnastics Business Plan 2005–2009. Welsh Gymnastics. 2005. Retrieved 2009-07-14. 
  142. ^ "History". Welsh Gymnastics website. Welsh Gymnastics. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-14. 
  143. ^ "BBC – South East Wales Cardiff – Cardiff's Vanished Racecourse – Brian Lee Reme". BBC Wales website. BBC. 5 December 2005. Retrieved 2009-06-27. 
  144. ^ "Welsh Judo Association". Welsh Judo Association-Cymdeithas Judo Cymru website. Welsh Judo Association. 2009. Retrieved 2009-09-09. 
  145. ^ "Honto Judo". Honto Judo website. Honto Judo. 2009. Retrieved 2009-09-10. 
  146. ^ "Fighting Promotion". Fighting Promotion website. Fighting Promotion. 2009. Retrieved 2009-09-10. 
  147. ^ "Welsh Judo Association". Welsh Judo Association-Cymdeithas Judo Cymru website. Welsh Judo Association. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-24. 
  148. ^ "Raise Your Game – Lessons from the legends – Neil Adams". BBC Cymru Wales website. BBC Wales. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-24. 
  149. ^ "Llandaff Rowing Club". Llandaff Rowing Club website. Llandaff Rowing Club. 18 June 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-02. 
  150. ^ "Cardiff City Rowing Club -News". Cardiff City Rowing Club website. Cardiff City Rowing Club. 2006. Retrieved 2009-07-02. [dead link]
  151. ^ "WARA – Welsh Amateur Rowing Association". Welsh Amateur Rowing Association-Rhwyfo Cymru website. Welsh Amateur Rowing Association. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-15. 
  152. ^ "WARA – Club Contacts". Welsh Amateur Rowing Association-Rhwyfo Cymru website. Welsh Amateur Rowing Association. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-15. 
  153. ^ "http://www.walesrowing.com/events/Taff%20Head%2009.pdf" (PDF). Welsh Amateur Rowing Association-Rhwyfo Cymru – Head of the Taff. Welsh Amateur Rowing Association. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-16. 
  154. ^ "WARA -Events". Welsh Amateur Rowing Association-Rhwyfo Cymru. Welsh Amateur Rowing Association. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-16. 
  155. ^ "WARA – International Rowing – HIR Selection Policy". Welsh Amateur Rowing Association-Rhwyfo Cymru. Welsh Amateur Rowing Association. 8 February 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-16. 
  156. ^ "Welsh Amateur Rowing Association, Cardiff, South East Wales, CF14 9BG, rowing d". Marine Wales Ltd website. Marine Wales Ltd. 2008. Retrieved 2009-07-22. 
  157. ^ "Llanishen Sailing Centre". Cardiff Couonty Council website. Cardiff County Council. 21 September 2009. Retrieved 2009-06-26. 
  158. ^ "Cardiff Yacht Club". Cardiff Yacht Club website. Cardiff Yacht Club. 14 May 2009. Retrieved 2009-06-26. 
  159. ^ "Welsh Target Shooting Federation". Welsh Target Shooting Federation website. Welsh Target Shooting Federation. 11 June 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-18. 
  160. ^ "Welsh Target Shooting Federation Limited". Welsh Target Shooting Federation website. Welsh Target Shooting Federation. 24 April 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-18. 
  161. ^ "http://www.wtsf.org.uk/wtsf_memorandum.pdf" (PDF). Welsh Target Shooting Federation website. Welsh Target Shooting Federation. 2006. Retrieved 2009-07-18. 
  162. ^ a b "Welcome". Ski & Snowboard Centre Cardiff. Ski and Snowboard Centre Cardiff. 2008. Retrieved 2009-06-28. 
  163. ^ "Snowsport Wales – Clubs". Snowsport Cymru/Wales website. Ski Council of Wales. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-19. 
  164. ^ "Snowsport Wales – About Us". Snowsport Cymru/Wales website. Ski Council of Wales. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-19. 
  165. ^ "WalesOnline – Sports – Motor Sport – Moto:Stars put boot into Millennium Stadium track". WalesOnline website. Media Wales Ltd. 30 June 2008. Retrieved 2009-06-255. 
  166. ^ "Cardiff Triathletes – Club Info". Cardiff Triathletes website. Cardiff Triathletes. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-06. 
  167. ^ "CJTC". Cardiff Junior Triathlon Club website. Cardiff Junior Triathlon Club. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-06. 
  168. ^ "WalesOnline – News -Wales News – Funding withdrawal threatens Wales Rally GB". WalesOnline website. Media Wales Ltd. 15 April 2009. Retrieved 2009-06-25. 
  169. ^ "ACGA Past Games 1958". Australian Commonwealth Games Association website. Australian Commonwealth Games Association. 2007. Retrieved 2009-06-25. 
  170. ^ "BBC NEWS – Wales – South East Wales – £32m world-class pool is opened". BBC News website (BBC). 12 January 2008. Retrieved 2009-06-26. 
  171. ^ a b "BBC SPORT:Olympics & Olympic sport:London 2012:Olympic training venues -". BBC SPORT website (BBC SPORT). 3 March 2008. Retrieved 2009-07-05. 
  172. ^ Thomas, Graham (16 October 2009). "BBC Sport – Athletics – Cardiff ponders Commonwealth bid". BBC News. Retrieved 2009-12-08.