Spotswood, New Jersey

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Spotswood, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Spotswood
Spotswood highlighted in Middlesex County
Spotswood highlighted in Middlesex County
Census Bureau map of Spotswood, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Spotswood, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°23′44″N 74°23′24″W / 40.395687°N 74.390089°W / 40.395687; -74.390089Coordinates: 40°23′44″N 74°23′24″W / 40.395687°N 74.390089°W / 40.395687; -74.390089[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Middlesex
Incorporated May 12, 1908
Government[5]
 • Type Faulkner Act (Mayor-Council)
 • Mayor Nicholas Poliseno (term ends December 31, 2016)[3]
 • Administrator Ronald Fasanello[4]
 • Clerk Patricia DeStefano[4]
Area[2]
 • Total 2.472 sq mi (6.402 km2)
 • Land 2.267 sq mi (5.872 km2)
 • Water 0.205 sq mi (0.531 km2)  8.29%
Area rank 375th of 566 in state
20th of 25 in county[2]
Elevation [6] 36 ft (11 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total 8,257
 • Estimate (2012[10]) 8,403
 • Rank 278th of 566 in state
20th of 25 in county[11]
 • Density 3,642.2/sq mi (1,406.3/km2)
 • Density rank 175th of 566 in state
13th of 25 in county[11]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08884[12][13]
Area code(s) 732[14]
FIPS code 3402369810[15][2][16]
GNIS feature ID 0885405[17][2]
Website www.spotswoodboro.com

Spotswood is a borough in Middlesex County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 8,257,[7][8][9] reflecting an increase of 377 (+4.8%) from the 7,880 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 103 (-1.3%) from the 7,983 counted in the 1990 Census.[18]

Spotswood was incorporated as a borough by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on April 15, 1908, from portions of East Brunswick Township, based on the passage of a referendum held on May 12, 1908.[19] It was originally called "Spotteswoode", named for the place in Scotland, and dates back to its original settlement in 1685.[20]

Geography[edit]

The borough is located at 40°23′44″N 74°23′24″W / 40.395687°N 74.390089°W / 40.395687; -74.390089 (40.395687,-74.390089). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 2.472 square miles (6.402 km2), of which, 2.267 square miles (5.872 km2) of it is land and 0.205 square miles (0.531 km2) of it (8.29%) is water.[1][2]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1910 623
1920 704 13.0%
1930 921 30.8%
1940 1,201 30.4%
1950 2,325 93.6%
1960 5,788 148.9%
1970 7,891 36.3%
1980 7,840 −0.6%
1990 7,983 1.8%
2000 7,880 −1.3%
2010 8,257 4.8%
Est. 2012 8,403 [10] 1.8%
Population sources: 1910-1920[21]
1910[22] 1910-1930[23]
1930-1990[24] 2000[25][26] 2010[7][8][9]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 8,257 people, 3,128 households, and 2,143 families residing in the borough. The population density was 3,642.2 per square mile (1,406.3 /km2). There were 3,242 housing units at an average density of 1,430.1 per square mile (552.2 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 88.63% (7,318) White, 2.98% (246) Black or African American, 0.11% (9) Native American, 5.14% (424) Asian, 0.01% (1) Pacific Islander, 1.27% (105) from other races, and 1.87% (154) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 8.32% (687) of the population.[7]

There were 3,128 households, of which 29.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.0% were married couples living together, 9.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.5% were non-families. 27.1% of all households were made up of individuals, and 15.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.56 and the average family size was 3.16.[7]

In the borough, 21.1% of the population were under the age of 18, 6.9% from 18 to 24, 24.3% from 25 to 44, 28.8% from 45 to 64, and 18.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43.5 years. For every 100 females there were 91.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.1 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $70,360 (with a margin of error of +/- $9,861) and the median family income was $90,652 (+/- $8,741). Males had a median income of $59,226 (+/- $4,823) versus $43,365 (+/- $4,935) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $31,249 (+/- $1,696). About 2.5% of families and 3.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.7% of those under age 18 and 6.4% of those age 65 or over.[27]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 7,880 people, 3,099 households, and 2,163 families residing in the borough. The population density was 3,389.8 people per square mile (1,311.4/km2). There were 3,158 housing units at an average density of 1,358.5 per square mile (525.6/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 99.24% White, .05% African American, .5% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, and 0.20% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.38% of the population.[25][26]

There were 3,099 households out of which 29.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.0% were married couples living together, 9.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.2% were non-families. 26.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.54 and the average family size was 3.10.[25][26]

In the borough the population was spread out with 22.4% under the age of 18, 6.8% from 18 to 24, 30.1% from 25 to 44, 23.4% from 45 to 64, and 17.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 93.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.9 males.[25][26]

The median income for a household in the borough was $55,833, and the median income for a family was $73,062. Males had a median income of $45,979 versus $35,859 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $25,247. About 2.6% of families and 4.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.4% of those under age 18 and 2.9% of those age 65 or over.[25][26]

Transportation[edit]

The borough had a total of 29.51 miles (47.49 km) of roadways, of which 25.44 miles (40.94 km) are maintained by the municipality and 4.07 miles (6.55 km) by Middlesex County.[28]

The main roads that pass through Spotswood include Middlesex CR 613 (Devoe Avenue / Main Street / Summerhill Road) connecting Monroe Township to the south and East Brunswick Township to the north[29] and Middlesex CR 615 (Manalapan Road / Main Street) connecting Helmetta in the southwest to East Brunswick Township in the borough's northwest corner.[30]

Both Route 18 and CR 527 just miss the borough by less than a mile. The closest limited access is the New Jersey Turnpike (Interstate 95) which is accessible in both neighboring East Brunswick Township (Exit 9) and bordering Monroe Township (Exit 8A).

New Jersey Transit provides bus service between the borough and the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan on the 138 route.[31]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

The Borough of Spotswood operates within the Faulkner Act (formally known as the Optional Municipal Charter Law of 1950) under the Mayor-Council (Plan B), implemented based on the recommendations of a Charter Study Commission as of July 1, 1976.[32] A mayor is elected by the people for a term of four years on a non-partisan basis. A five-member council is elected on a non-partisan basis with each councilman serving four-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either two or three seats up for vote every other year as part of the November general election.[5] The mayor is the chief executive and has responsibility for the administration of the government. The legislative power resides solely within the borough council. There is separation of legislative and executive power in this form of government.

As of 2013, the Mayor of Spotswood is Nicholas Poliseno whose term of office ends December 31, 2016.[33] Members of the Borough Council are Council President Edward Seely (2016), Margaret Drozd (2014), Frank LoSacco (2016), Nicholas Legakis (serving an unexpired term until November 2013) and Curtis Stollen (2014).[34][35]

Citing potential savings of $25,000, Spotswood's council approved a measure in 2010 that would allow the borough to take advantage of new state legislation under which it would to shift its non-partisan municipal elections from May to the November general election, with the first municipal race taking place in November 2012.[36] In the November 2012 general election, Nicholas Poliseno defeated Curtis Stollen in the mayoral race to succeed Thomas W. Barlow, who didn't run for re-election. Council incumbents Frank LoSacco and Edward T. Seely ran unopposed.[37]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Spotswood is located in the 12th Congressional District[38] and is part of New Jersey's 14th state legislative district.[8][39][40] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Spotswood had been in the 18th state legislative district.[41]

New Jersey's Twelfth Congressional District is represented by Rush D. Holt, Jr. (D, Hopewell Township).[42] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[43][44] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[45][46]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 14th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Linda R. Greenstein (D, Plainsboro Township) and in the General Assembly by Daniel R. Benson (D, Hamilton Township, Mercer County) and Wayne DeAngelo (D, Hamilton Township).[47][48] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[49] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[50]

Middlesex County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders, whose seven members are elected at-large to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with two or three seats coming up for election each year. At an annual reorganization meeting held in January, the board selects from among its members a Freeholder Director and Deputy Director. As of 2014, Middlesex County's Freeholders (with committee chairmanship, party affiliation, residence and term-end year listed in parentheses) are Freeholder Director Ronald G. Rios (Ex-officio on all committees - D, term ends December 31, 2015; Carteret),[51] Freeholder Deputy Director Carol Barrett Bellante (County Administration - D, 2014; Monmouth Junction, South Brunswick Township),[52] Kenneth Armwood (Business Development and Education - D, 2016; Piscataway),[53] Charles Kenny (Finance - D, 2016; Woodbridge Township),[54] H. James Polos (Public Safety and Health - D, 2015; Highland Park),[55] Charles E. Tomaro (Infrastructure Management - D, 2014; Edison)[56] and Blanquita B. Valenti (Community Services - D, 2016; New Brunswick).[57][58][59][60][61] Constitutional officers are County Clerk Elaine M. Flynn (D; Old Bridge Township),[62] Sheriff Mildred S. Scott (D, 2016; Piscataway)[63] and Surrogate Kevin J. Hoagland (D, 2017; New Brunswick).[58][64]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 5,119 registered voters in Spotswood, of which 1,485 (29.0%) were registered as Democrats, 965 (18.9%) were registered as Republicans and 2,667 (52.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 2 voters registered to other parties.[65]

In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 52.4% of the vote here (2,001 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 45.4% (1,734 votes) and other candidates with 1.7% (64 votes), among the 3,820 ballots cast by the borough's 5,217 registered voters, for a turnout of 73.2%.[66] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 55.4% of the vote here (2,014 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 43.4% (1,580 votes) and other candidates with 0.7% (34 votes), among the 3,638 ballots cast by the borough's 4,952 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 73.5.[67]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 63.2% of the vote here (1,627 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 28.6% (736 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 6.4% (165 votes) and other candidates with 1.2% (31 votes), among the 2,576 ballots cast by the borough's 5,043 registered voters, yielding a 51.1% turnout.[68]

Education[edit]

The Spotswood Public Schools serve students in pre-Kindergarten through twelfth grade. Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[69]) are G. Austin Schoenly Elementary School[70] (Pre-K to 1st grade; 277 students), E. R. Appleby Elementary School[71] (grades 2-5; 427), Memorial Middle School[72] (grades 6-8; 338) and Spotswood High School[73] (grades 9-12; 766).[74] The Appleby and Schoenly elementary schools offer after school and summer childcare program through the Spotswood C.A.R.E.S. (Children's After-school Recreation and Enrichment at Spotswood) program.[75]

All public students from Helmetta, a non-operating district, attend the Spotswood schools, along with students from Milltown who attend Spotswood High School as part of a sending/receiving relationship with the Milltown Public Schools.[76][77]

Immaculate Conception Pre-School (toddler-PreK) and Immaculate Conception School (K-8) operate under the supervision of Roman Catholic Diocese of Metuchen.[78]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 13, 2013. As of date accessed, Poliseno's term-end date is incorrectly listed as June 30, 2016, apparently as the shift of elections from May to November was not taken into account.
  4. ^ a b Directory, Borough of Spotswood. Accessed November 27, 2012.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 84.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Spotswood, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 14, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Spotswood borough, Middlesex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 27, 2012.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 7. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Spotswood borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed November 27, 2012.
  10. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  11. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 27, 2012.
  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Spotswood, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed November 27, 2012.
  13. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  14. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Sparta, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed November 6, 2013.
  15. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  16. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed October 30, 2012.
  17. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  18. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed November 27, 2012.
  19. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 174. Accessed October 25, 2012.
  20. ^ Cheslow, Jerry. "If You're Thinking of Living in: Spotswood", The New York Times, May 30, 1993. Accessed November 6, 2013. "Named for the town of Spotteswoode in Scotland, the borough traces its history to 1685, when a Scot named James Johnstone took advantage of an offer from the British proprietors of New Jersey of 50 acres to anyone willing to move to outlying areas. Thus, Spotswood became the first European settlement in southern Middlesex County."
  21. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed November 6, 2013.
  22. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 337. Accessed November 27, 2012.
  23. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 717. Accessed November 27, 2012.
  24. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed November 27, 2012.
  25. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Spotswood borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 27, 2012.
  26. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Spotswood borough, Middlesex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 27, 2012.
  27. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Spotswood borough, Middlesex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 27, 2012.
  28. ^ Middlesex County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed November 6, 2013.
  29. ^ Middlesex County Route 613 Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation, December 1999. Accessed November 6, 2013.
  30. ^ Middlesex County Route 615 Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation, December 1999. Accessed November 6, 2013.
  31. ^ Middlesex County Bus / Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of August 31, 2009. Accessed November 6, 2013.
  32. ^ "The Faulkner Act: New Jersey's Optional Municipal Charter Law", New Jersey State League of Municipalities, July 2007. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  33. ^ Todaro, Vincent. "Poliseno edges out Stollen in Spotswood mayoral bid", East Brunswick Sentinel, November 15, 2012. Accessed March 11, 2013.
  34. ^ Spotswood Borough Council, Spotswood Borough. Accessed November 6, 2013.
  35. ^ 2013 Municipal Data Sheet, Spotswood Borough. Accessed November 6, 2013.
  36. ^ Shahid, Aliyah. "9 in Perth Amboy, 4 in Spotswood seek council seats", The Star-Ledger, March 18, 2010. Accessed November 27, 2012. "Until this year, under state law, non-partisan towns were required to hold their municipal elections on the second Tuesday in May. In January, the state passed a law allowing municipalities to switch the date from May to November, on the same day as the general election.... Earlier this month, Spotswood unanimously approved the move to hold elections in November, starting in 2012."
  37. ^ McEvoy, James. "Poliseno edges out Stollen in Spotswood mayoral bid; Currently the borough’s volunteer fire chief, mayor-elect says voters wanted change", Sentinel, November 15, 2012. Accessed November 27, 2012. "Councilman Nicholas Poliseno will serve as the next mayor of Spotswood, having edged out longtime council President Curtis Stollen in the borough’s first contested mayoral race in many years. Poliseno garnered 1,471 to Stollen’s 1,222 in the Nov. 6 elections.... In the Nov. 6 council election, incumbents Frank LoSacco and Edward T. Seely, who ran with Stollen, won re-election with 1,743 and 1,734, respectively. They ran uncontested."
  38. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  39. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 64, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  40. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  41. ^ 2011 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 64, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  42. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  43. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  44. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  45. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  46. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  47. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 28, 2014.
  48. ^ District 14 Legislators, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 28, 2014.
  49. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  50. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  51. ^ Ronald G. Rios, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  52. ^ Carol Barrett Bellante, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  53. ^ Kenneth Armwood, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  54. ^ Charles Kenny, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  55. ^ H. James Polos, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  56. ^ Charles E. Tomaro, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  57. ^ Blanquita B. Valenti, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  58. ^ a b Elected County Officials, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  59. ^ 11/5/2013 General Election Unofficial Results, Middlesex County, November 12, 2013. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  60. ^ Staff. "Middlesex County election results 2012", NJ.com, November 6, 2012, updated November 13, 2012. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  61. ^ Staff. "Middlesex County election results 2011", The Star-Ledger, November 8, 2011. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  62. ^ County Clerk, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  63. ^ Sheriff, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  64. ^ Surrogate, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  65. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Middlesex, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed November 27, 2012.
  66. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Middlesex County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed November 27, 2012.
  67. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Middlesex County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed November 27, 2012.
  68. ^ 2009 Governor: Middlesex County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed November 27, 2012.
  69. ^ Data for the Spotswood Public Schools, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed November 27, 2012.
  70. ^ G. Austin Schoenly Elementary School, Spotswood Public Schools. Accessed November 6, 2013.
  71. ^ E. R. Appleby Elementary School, Spotswood Public Schools. Accessed November 6, 2013.
  72. ^ Memorial Middle School, Spotswood Public Schools. Accessed November 6, 2013.
  73. ^ Spotswood High School, Spotswood Public Schools. Accessed November 6, 2013.
  74. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Spotswood Public Schools, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed September 23, 2013.
  75. ^ Children's After school Recreation and Enrichment at Spotswood, Spotswood Public Schools. Accessed November 27, 2012.
  76. ^ Milltown Fact Sheet, Joyce Kilmer School. Accessed November 27, 2012. "Through a formal send–receive contract, approved by the Department of Education, our high school students are sent on a tuition basis to Spotswood High School. Our 2012-2013 budget of $14.3 million supports Parkview School and Joyce Kilmer School, as well as the tuition for students attending Spotswood High School."
  77. ^ Parents, Spotswood High School. Accessed November 27, 2012. "Welcome to Spotswood High School, a comprehensive institution that focuses on excellence in academics, the arts, athletics, and community service. Spotswood High School has served the residents in Spotswood, Helmetta, and Milltown since 1976."
  78. ^ Find a school, Roman Catholic Diocese of Metuchen. Accessed September 11, 2012.

External links[edit]