Spring Township, Berks County, Pennsylvania

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For other Pennsylvania townships of the same name, see Spring Township, Pennsylvania.
Coordinates: 40°21′00″N 75°59′29″W / 40.35000°N 75.99139°W / 40.35000; -75.99139
Spring Township
Township
WERTZ'S COVERED BRIDGE.jpg
Country United States
State Pennsylvania
County Berks
Elevation 364 ft (110.9 m)
Coordinates 40°21′00″N 75°59′29″W / 40.35000°N 75.99139°W / 40.35000; -75.99139
Area 18.3 sq mi (47.4 km2)
 - land 18.2 sq mi (47 km2)
 - water 0.04 sq mi (0 km2), 0.22%
Population 27,119 (2010)
Density 1,196.9 / sq mi (462.1 / km2)
Timezone EST (UTC-5)
 - summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
Area code 610
Location of Spring Township in Pennsylvania
Location of Pennsylvania in the United States
Website: [1]

Spring Township is a township in Berks County, Pennsylvania, USA. The population was 27,119 at the 2010 census, making it the second most populous municipality in Berks County after the city of Reading.

History[edit]

In 1850, the Township of Cumru included about 33,000 acres of land with a population of 3,853 making it the most populous district in the county outside of Reading. In area, this was the largest township. In the decade before, two unsuccessful attempts were made to divide Cumru on account of its great extent. In 1850, a third attempt was made. The petition called for a division line situated to the west of the line requested in previous petitions, beginning at the “Harrisburg Bridge” and extending southward to the Lancaster County lines, at the corner of Brecknock Township, and it was inscribed by only 45 taxable inhabitants of the township. The court appointed Aaron Albright, Richard Boone and Michael K. Boyer as commissioners to inquire into advisability of the proposed division. The commissioners, after viewing Cumru Township, divided it and recommended the western part to be designated as a new township under the name of “Spring”. The name was derived from a large fresh water spring in the central portion of the area. Because of the limestone fissures under the ground, the spring periodically appeared and disappeared. The early settlers, who used it for their daily water supplies, referred to it as the “Sinking Spring”. The Boundary lines of the township were described as enclosing some 15,000 acres. The report was presented for these boundaries on August 5, 1850. The Court confirmed the report on November 23, 1850 and formed the new township calling it the Township of Spring.[1]

Wertz's Covered Bridge was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1978.[2]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township has a total area of 18.3 square miles (47.3 km²), of which, 18.2 square miles (47.2 km²) of it is land and 0.04 square miles (0.1 km²) of it (0.22%) is water.

Since it is extensive from near the Schuylkill River in the NE to the Lancaster County border in the SW, its terrain varies considerably. Most is drained to the Schuylkill except for the SW end which in the Susquehanna watershed and drains via the Conestoga River. While much of the north is low-lying, much of the SW is mountainous. The Cacoosing Creek forms the natural NW boundary and flows into the Tulpehocken Creek, which in turn forms the natural NE boundary.

Adjacent townships

Adjacent boroughs

The township's numbered roads are U.S. Route 222, U.S. Route 422, and Route 724. 222 and 724 meet in Spring Township and both meet 422 in Wyomissing and Sinking Spring, respectively. 222 and 422 continue NE as the Warren Street Bypass across Wyomissing until Routes 12, 222, and 422 diverge. 222 continues NW across the township as the Outer Bypass and turns NE over the Tulpehocken for Maidencreek Township and Allentown. 222 south provides expressway access to Interstate 76 (East-West Turnpike) and Lancaster. Other important local roads include Chapel Hill Road, Fritztown Road, Grings Hill Road, Paper Mill Road, State Hill Road, Van Reed Road, and Vinemont Road.

Unincorporated communities in Spring Township include Colony Park, Fritztown (also in South Heidelberg Township,) Lincoln Park, Mohns Hill, Montello, Montrose Manor, Spring Ridge, Springmont, Van Reed Mills (also in Lower Heidelberg Township,) Vinemont (also in South Heidelberg Township,) West Wyomissing, Whitfield, and Wilshire.

Demographics[edit]

As of the census[3] of 2000, there were 21,805 people, 8,739 households, and 6,248 families residing in the township. The population density was 1,196.9 people per square mile (462.1/km²). There were 8,995 housing units at an average density of 493.7/sq mi (190.6/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 93.55% White, 2.10% African American, 0.06% Native American, 2.16% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 1.02% from other races, and 1.10% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.89% of the population.

There were 8,739 households out of which 31.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.2% were married couples living together, 7.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.5% were non-families. 23.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.47 and the average family size was 2.93.

Historical population
Census Pop.
1980 17,193
1990 18,899 9.9%
2000 21,805 15.4%
2010 27,119 24.4%
Source:US Census Bureau

In the township the population was spread out with 23.4% under the age of 18, 6.0% from 18 to 24, 28.3% from 25 to 44, 25.2% from 45 to 64, and 17.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 92.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.6 males.

The median income for a household in the township was $56,025, and the median income for a family was $63,724. Males had a median income of $45,910 versus $29,476 for females. The per capita income for the township was $26,493. About 0.9% of families and 1.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.6% of those under age 18 and 2.4% of those age 65 or over.

Commercial activity[edit]

Spring Township hosts a number of commercial parks. The township shares the primary retail district of Reading's western suburbs with Wyomissing and includes multiple power centers and a number of restaurants in this area extending north and west from the Berkshire Mall as far north as the Spring Ridge Drive exit off US Route 222.

Education[edit]

The township hosts Penn State Berks, which offers four-year and associate degrees as well as certificate programs. This is located in the NE corner off the Broadcasting Road exit of the Outer Bypass. Spring Township is in the Wilson School District.

Board of supervisors[edit]

  • Barry W. Ulrich - Chairman
  • Patti J. Smith - Vice Chairman
  • Kyle M. Hummel
  • Alan S. Kreider
  • James Oswald

References[edit]

External links[edit]

  • Township map [2]