Sri Krishna Devaraya Andhra Bhasha Nilayam

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Sri Kriishna Devaraya Andhra Bahasha Nilayam (Telugu: శ్రీ కృష్ణ దేవరాయాంధ్ర భాషా నిలయం) is perhaps the oldest non-Government Library in the State of Andhra Pradesh.[1]

The library was started on September 1, 1901. The Bhasha Nilayam named after Sri Krishnadevaraya, functioned initially from the Ramkote residence of Jagirdar Ravichettu Ranga Rao, the founding secretary. Later, with a donation of Rs. 3,000 from the wife of Ranga Rao, a small tiled house was bought in Sultan Bazar to house the Bhasha Nilayam. Madapati Hanumantha Rao, who became secretary in 1915, raised more funds for its growth.

The Bhasha Nilayam celebrated its silver jubilee in 1927 with Burgula Ramakrishna Rao as its secretary and golden jubilee in 1952 when Burgula became the Chief Minister. The poet laureate Sripada Krishna Sastry inaugurated the golden jubilee celebrations. The Nilayam celebrated its centenary in 2001. Madiraju Lakshmi Narasimha Rao, secretary of the Nilayam for the past over 25 years.

Among the leading personalities involved in the founding and strengthening of this institution in its formative years were the Munagala Raja, Nayani Venkata Ranga Rao, eminent researcher-historian Komarraju Lakshmana Rao, Pardhasarathi Apparao Bahadur of Palwancha, Suravaram Pratapa Reddy, Madapati Hanumantha Rao, Burgula Ramakrishna Rao, Adiraju Veerabhadra Rao and Raja Bahadur Venkatram Reddy.

The Bhasha Nilayam was cradle of the nationalist struggle against the Nizam's rule and a center for Telugu language. Great people in politics, literature and culture considered it a privilege to address the gathering here.[2]

There are about 40,000-odd books and old newspapers and magazines. The Sundarayya Vignana Kendram is helping the library in conservation, automation and electronic catalogueing. Four storied new building is being constructed during the Telugu Desam Party rule by generous Funding from the Government of Andhra Pradesh.

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