Sri Lankan parliamentary election, 2010

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14th Sri Lankan parliamentary election
Sri Lanka
2004 ←
8 April 2010
→ 2016

All 225 seats to the Parliament of Sri Lanka
113 seats were needed for a majority
Turnout 61.26%
  First party Second party
  WEF on the Middle East Arab and foreign Ministers Crop.jpg Ranil At UNP Office.jpg
Leader Mahinda Rajapaksa Ranil Wickremasinghe
Party United People's Freedom Alliance United National Front
Leader's seat n/a Colombo District
Last election 105 seats, 45.60% 82 seats, 37.83%
Seats won 144 60
Seat change + 39 − 22
Popular vote 4,846,388 2,357,057
Percentage 60.33% 29.34%

  Third party Fourth party
  R. Sampanthan.jpg Sarath Fonseka portrait.jpg
Leader Rajavarothiam Sampanthan Sarath Fonseka
Party Tamil National Alliance Democratic National Alliance
Leader's seat Trincomalee District Colombo District
Last election 22 seats, 6.84% -
Seats won 14 7
Seat change − 8 + 7
Popular vote 233,190 441,251
Percentage 2.90% 5.49%

Sri Lankan Parliamentary Election 2010.png

Winners of polling divisions. UPFA in blue, UNF in green and TNA in yellow.

Prime Minister before election

Ratnasiri Wickremanayake
United People's Freedom Alliance

Prime Minister-designate

D. M. Jayaratne
United People's Freedom Alliance

The 2010 Sri Lankan parliamentary election was held on April 8 and April 20, 2010, to elect 225 members to Sri Lanka's 14th Parliament.[1] 14,088,500 Sri Lankans were eligible to vote in the election at 11,102 polling stations. It was the first general election held in Sri Lanka following the conclusion of the 30 year long civil war.

The main parties contesting in the election were the party of Sri Lankan president Mahinda Rajapakse, the ruling United People's Freedom Alliance (UPFA), the main opposition United National Front (UNF) and the Democratic National Alliance (DNA) of Sarath Fonseka. President Rajapakse was previously reelected as president in January 2010.

As expected, the UPFA secured a landslide victory in the elections, buoyed by its achievement of ending the 30 year Sri Lankan Civil War by defeating the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam in May 2009. The UPFA won a large majority in the house, obtaining 144 seats, an increase of 39 since the 2004 election. The main opposition UNF is won 60 seats, a decline of 22. The minority Tamil party Tamil National Alliance (TNA) won 14 seats, down from the 22 they won in 2004, and the DNA, contesting for the first time, won 7 seats.[2][3] The UPFA however fell short of its goal of obtaining a two-thirds supermajority in the house, which it would have needed to change the constitution on its own.[4] The election saw the lowest voter turnout since independence.[5]

While the election was initially scheduled to be concluded on April 8, irregularities in two districts led the Commissioner of Elections to hold re-polls on April 20. Final results were announced on the 21st, a day before the new parliament is scheduled to meet for the very first time.

Background[edit]

General elections are usually held every six years in Sri Lanka, to elect 225 members to the Parliament of Sri Lanka. The country is divided into 22 electoral districts, and each district is assigned a specific number of seats depending on the districts population, with 196 seats distributed among the districts. At the election, parties contesting in a given district are awarded a certain number of seats available from the district based on the number of votes obtained in the whole district. The remaining 29 seats are distributed amongst the contesting political parties based on the percentage of the national vote received by each party.[6]

The previous parliamentary election was held on April 2, 2004. The newly formed UPFA alliance became the largest group in Parliament by winning 105 of the 225 seats, allowing it to form a minority government with the support of the sole Eelam People's Democratic Party MP.[7][8] On April 6, 2004, President Chandrika Kumaratunga appointed Mahinda Rajapaksa, the leader of the UPFA, as the new Prime Minister.[9] The rest of the government were sworn in on April 10, 2004.[10][11] The new parliament was sworn in on April 22, 2004.[12]

Since then a number of defections and counter-defections from the opposition have increased the number of government MPs to 129, most of whom have been rewarded with ministerial posts:[13]

This has allowed the UPFA form a stable government for six years.

Following the expiration of the second term of President Kumaratunge, Prime Minister Mahinda Rajapakse defeated the leader of the United National Party and former Prime Minister Ranil Wickremasinghe in the 2005 Presidential election. He was succeeded as Prime Minister by Ratnasiri Wickremanayake. Under Rajapakse, the Sri Lankan military defeated the militant Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam group in May 2009, ending the 30 year Sri Lankan Civil War and significantly increasing Rajapaksa's popularity in the country. Rajapaksa rode this wave of popularity to win the 2010 Presidential election, defeating opposition candidate Sarath Fonseka by a large margin.

Details[edit]

With the term of the 13th Parliament (also known as the 6th Parliament) scheduled to end in April 2010, Rajapaksa dissolved parliament on February 9, 2010, paving the way for fresh elections.[1] Nominations took place between February 19 and February 26, and the date of the election was set for April 8, 2010.[1] 14,088,500 Sri Lankans were eligible to vote in the election, for which 11,102 polling stations were set up. Of this, 415,432 people were eligible to cast their vote via postal voting. Final votes were counted at 1,387 counting centers around the country.[32]

Since the 2004 election, there were four changes to number of seats allocated to each electoral district. Anuradhapura and Gampaha gained one seat each while Colombo and Kurunegala lost a seat each.[33]

Contesting parties[edit]

All the constituent parties of the ruling UPFA contested under its banner. The parliamentary opposition parties (UNF, Janatha Vimukthi Peramuna (JVP) and (TNA), who had come together to support common opposition candidate Sarath Fonseka at the presidential election, were unable to form a common alliance to contest in the election. Therefore the UNF and the TNA contested alone, while Fonseka and the JVP allied to form a new alliance called the Democratic National Alliance (DNA). Fonseka was the DNA's chief candidate in Colombo district.[34]

The UPFA, UNF and DNA contested in all 22 electoral districts while the TNA contested in the 5 districts in the north and east.[35] The UNF contested under the name and symbol of the United National Party, as it had done in the previous two parliamentary elections.[35] The TNA contested under the name and symbol of the Illankai Tamil Arasu Kachchi, as it did in the last parliamentary election.[35]

A record 7,680 candidates contested for the 196 district seats.[35]

Violence and violations of election laws[edit]

Sri Lankan elections have a history of violence, misuse of state resources, and other violations of election laws. 274 incidents had been reported to the police up to 5 April.[36] The Centre for Monitoring Election Violence (CMEV) recorded 413 incidents up to 7 April.[37] The CMEV has stated that it is impossible to say if the election had been "free and fair".[38] People's Action for Free and Fair Elections (PAFFREL) recorded 270 incidents up to 7 April.[39] The Campaign for Free and Fair Elections (CaFFE) has stated that the election was not free and fair.[40] CaFFE condemned the police and election commissioner for not enforcing electoral law.[41] The Asian Network for Free Elections (ANFREL) also recorded a number of violations.[42]

A significant feature of the violence was the intra-party clashes between UPFA candidates.

On the day of the election, there were a number of elections violations reported around the country. The violations in the Nawalapitiya electorate of the Kandy District were serious enough for the Elections Commissioner to nullify the voting in some areas of the electorate and order a re-poll.[43] Results from the Trincomalee District were also suspended as some ballot papers had been stolen.[44] Re-polling for the effected polling areas took place on April 20.[45]

Results[edit]

District by district[edit]

e • d  District by district results of the Sri Lankan parliamentary election, 2010
District Province UPFA UNP DNA ITAK Others Total seats Turnout
Votes Seats   +/-   Votes Seats   +/-   Votes Seats   +/-   Votes Seats   +/-   Seats
         
Colombo Western 480,896 10 +2 339,750 7 −2 110,683 2 +2 DNC 0 19 65%
Gampaha 589,476 12 +3 266,523 5 −1 69,747 1 +1 DNC 0 18 67%
Kalutara 313,836 7 +1 139,596 2 −1 36,722 1 +1 DNC 0 10 67%
Mahanuwara Central 339,819 8 +3 192,798 4 −2 23,728 0 - DNC 0 12 64%
Matale 131,069 4 +1 55,737 1 −1 7,636 0 - DNC 0 5 60%
Nuwara Eliya 149,111 5 +3 96,885 2 − 2 3,984 0 - DNC 0 7 66%
Galle Southern 305,307 7 +1 120,101 2 −2 33,663 1 +1 DNC 0 10 64%
Matara 213,937 6 +1 91,114 2 −1 20,465 0 - DNC 0 8 59%
Hambantota 174,808 5 - 83,027 2 - 19,186 0 - DNC 0 7 69%
Jaffna Northern 47,622 3 +3 12,624 1 +1 201 0 - 65,119 5 −3 0 9 23%
Vanni 37,522 2 +2 12,783 1 - 301 0 - 41,673 3 −2 0 6 44%
Batticaloa Eastern 62,009 1 +1 22,935 1 +1 324 0 - 66,235 3 −1 0 5 59%
Digamadulla 132,096 4 +1 90,757 2 +1 2,917 0 - 26,895 1 - 0 7 74%
Trincomalee 59,784 2 +1 39,691 1 +1 2,519 0 - 33,268 1 −1 0 4 62%
Kurunegala North Western 429,316 10 +1 213,713 5 −2 26,440 0 - DNC 0 15 61%
Puttalam 167,769 6 +1 81,152 2 −1 8,792 0 - DNC 0 8 57%
Anuradhapura North Central 221,204 7 +2 80,360 2 −1 18,129 0 - DNC 0 9 61%
Polonnauwa 118,694 4 +1 45,732 1 −1 6,457 0 - DNC 0 5 66%
Badulla Uva 203,689 6 +3 112,886 2 −3 15,768 0 - DNC 0 8 65%
Monaragala 120,634 4 +1 28,892 1 −1 9,018 0 - DNC 0 5 56%
Ratnapura Sabaragamuwa 305,327 7 +1 125,076 3 −1 11,053 0 - DNC 0 10 65%
Kegalle 242,463 7 +2 104,925 2 −2 13,518 0 - DNC 0 9 63%
National List 17 +4 9 −2 2 +2 1 −1 0 29 -
Total 4,846,388 144 +39 2,357,057 60 −22 441,251 7 +7 233,190 14 −8 0 225 61%
Source: Sri Lanka Department of Elections

Overall[edit]

e • d Summary of the 2010 Sri Lankan parliamentary election
Alliances and parties Votes % Seats
District National Total
  United People's Freedom Alliance 4,846,388 60.33% 127 17 144
  United National Front3 2,357,057 29.34% 51 9 60
  Tamil National Alliance4 233,190 2.90% 13 1 14
  Democratic National Alliance 441,251 5.49% 5 2 7
Independent lists 38,947 0.48% 0 0 0
  Up-Country People's Front2 24,670 0.31% 0 0 0
Tamil Makkal Viduthalai Pulikal 20,284 0.25% 0 0 0
  Sinhalaye Mahasammatha Bhoomiputra Pakshaya 12,170 0.15% 0 0 0
  Tamil United Liberation Front 9,223 0.11% 0 0 0
  Tamil National People's Front5 7,544 0.09% 0 0 0
  Democratic People's Liberation Front 6,036 0.08% 0 0 0
Sri Lanka National Front 5,313 0.07% 0 0 0
Others 31,644 0.39% 0 0 0
Valid Votes 8,033,717 100.00% 196 29 225
Rejected Votes 596,972
Total Polled 8,630,689
Registered Electors 14,088,500
Turnout 61.26%
Source: Department of Elections, Sri Lanka
1. The EPDP contested separately in Vanni and with the United People's Freedom Alliance in all other districts.
2. The UCPF contested separately in Badulla and Nuwara Eliya, and with the United People's Freedom Alliance in all other districts.
3. The UNF contested under the name and symbol of United National Party.
4. The TNA contested under the name and symbol of Illankai Tamil Arasu Kachchi.
5. The TNPF contested under the name and symbol of All Ceylon Tamil Congress.

Elected members[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "6th Parliament Dissolved". News and Events. Parliament of Sri Lanka. 10 February 2010. Retrieved 13 February 2010. 
  2. ^ Sirilal, Ranga. "Sri Lanka ruling party records landslide win at polls". Montrealgazette.com. Retrieved 2010-04-21. [dead link]
  3. ^ "Department of Election". Slelections.gov.lk. Retrieved 2010-04-21. 
  4. ^ Sri Lanka ruling party wins majority in parliament, BBC News, 9 April 2010 
  5. ^ Haviland, Charles (21 April 2010). "Final Sri Lanka vote count confirms Rajapaksa triumph". BBC News. Retrieved 21 April 2010. 
  6. ^ "Department of Election". Slelections.gov.lk. Retrieved 2010-04-21. 
  7. ^ "The 7th Parliamentary Election Today". The Daily Mirror (Sri Lanka). 8 April 2010. Retrieved 8 April 2010. 
  8. ^ Gnanadass, Wilson (11 April 2004). "Shorter life span for minority govt.'s". The Sunday Leader. Retrieved 8 April 2010. 
  9. ^ "Sri Lanka's 14th Prime Minister Mr. Mahinda Rajapakse". TamilNet. 6 April 2004. Retrieved 28 November 2009. 
  10. ^ Vidanage, Harinda (11 April 2004). "Cabinet in crisis – JVP keeps out By Harinda Vidanage". Sunday Times, Sri Lanka. Retrieved 28 November 2009. 
  11. ^ "JVP boycotts UPFA cabinet swearing in ceremony". TamilNet. 10 April 2004. Retrieved 28 November 2009. 
  12. ^ "Opening of 13th Parliament today". Daily News, Sri Lanka. 22 April 2004. Retrieved 28 November 2009. 
  13. ^ de Silva, Lakshmi (25 November 2009). "UPFA gained huge ground after 2005". Daily News, Sri Lanka. Retrieved 28 November 2009. 
  14. ^ "SLMC dissident to be made Minister in UPFA government". TamilNet. 9 August 2004. Retrieved 28 November 2009. 
  15. ^ "CWC will support Kumaratunga's government – Thondaman". TamilNet. 3 September 2004. Retrieved 28 November 2009. 
  16. ^ P. Krishnaswamy (4 September 2004). "CWC announces unconditional support to UPFA Government". Daily News, Sri Lanka. Retrieved 28 November 2009. 
  17. ^ "JVP leaves coalition Government". TamilNet. 16 June 2005. Retrieved 28 November 2009. 
  18. ^ Weerasinghe, Chamikara (17 June 2005). "VP leaves Govt with regret". Daily News, Sri Lanka. Retrieved 28 November 2009. 
  19. ^ "Two UNP parliamentarians cross over". TamilNet. 25 January 2006. Retrieved 28 November 2009. 
  20. ^ "Four senior UNPers join Sri Lanka govt". MahindaRajapaska.com. 25 January 2006. Retrieved 28 November 2009. 
  21. ^ "UNP dissidents, SLMC join UPFA government, appointed ministers". TamilNet. 28 January 2007. Retrieved 28 November 2009. 
  22. ^ "18 jumbos cross over". Daily News, Sri Lanka. 29 January 2007. Retrieved 28 November 2009. 
  23. ^ "Sri Lankan ruling party boosts parliamentary strength". People's Daily, China. 28 January 2007. Retrieved 28 November 2009. 
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  27. ^ Mandana Ismail Abeywickrema (7 March 2010). "The Best Among Equals". The Sunday Leader. Retrieved 8 April 2010. 
  28. ^ "SLMC resigns from Rajapaksa government". TamilNet. 12 December 2007. Retrieved 28 November 2009. 
  29. ^ "Why the SLMC quit the Rajapaska government". Nation, Sri Lanka. 16 December 2007. Retrieved 28 November 2009. 
  30. ^ "JVP dissidents form JNP". TamilNet. 12 May 208. Retrieved 28 November 2009. 
  31. ^ "UPFA looks for strength in alliance with JVP as election fever hots up". The Nation, Sri Lanka. 28 December 2008. Retrieved 28 November 2009. 
  32. ^ "Department of Election". Slelections.gov.lk. Retrieved 2010-04-21. 
  33. ^ "Parliamentary Elections – 2010". News. Department of Elections, Sri Lanka. Retrieved 28 February 2010. 
  34. ^ "Nominations for Parliamentary elections close". Sunday Times (Sri Lanka). 26 February 2010. Retrieved 28 February 2010. 
  35. ^ a b c d Wellaboda, Ishtartha (28 February 2010). "Battle of Titans in Colombo". News (The Nation, Sri Lanka). Retrieved 28 February 2010. 
  36. ^ "Violence rages in Ampara, officials threaten boycott". Daily Mirror (Sri Lanka). 6 April 2010. Retrieved 21 April 2010. 
  37. ^ "Monitoring election violence in Sri Lanka Parliamentary Election April 2010: Summary of incidents to date". Centre for Monitoring Election Violence. 7 April 2010. Retrieved 21 April 2010. 
  38. ^ Burke, Jason (9 April 2010). "Sri Lanka's President Rajapaska's party looks set for election victory". The Guardian. Retrieved 21 April 2010. 
  39. ^ "Parliamentary General Elections –2010 Third interim report – 7th April 2010". People's Action for Free and Fair Elections. 7 April 2010. Retrieved 21 April 2010. 
  40. ^ "Sri Lanka ruling party wins majority in parliament". BBC News. 9 April 2010. Retrieved 21 April 2010. 
  41. ^ "CaFFE Election Day Press Release". Campaign for Free and Fair Elections. 8 April 2010. Retrieved 21 April 2010. 
  42. ^ Kelum Bandara and Yohan Perera (9 April 2010). "Some candidates violated the law – Asian monitors". Daily Mirror (Sri Lanka). Retrieved 21 April 2010. 
  43. ^ "N'pitiya repoll to be Gazetted". Dailymirror.lk. 2010-04-09. Retrieved 2010-04-21. 
  44. ^ "Trinco results suspended". Dailymirror.lk. 2010-04-09. Retrieved 2010-04-21. 
  45. ^ http://psephos.adam-carr.net/countries/s/srilanka/srilanka2010leg.txt

External links[edit]