St-Just Super-Cyclone

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Super-Cyclone
St Just Aviation Super Cyclone C-GGXU on amphib floats 01.JPG
Role Amateur-built aircraft
National origin Canada
Manufacturer St-Just Aviation
First flight 1999
Introduction 1999
Status In production (2013)
Number built At least 7 (2013)
Unit cost
US$50,000 (2011)
Developed from St-Just Cyclone, Cessna 180 and Cessna 185

The St-Just Super-Cyclone is a Canadian amateur-built aircraft produced by St-Just Aviation of Boucherville, Quebec. The aircraft is supplied as plans or as a kit for amateur construction.[1][2][3]

Design and development[edit]

The Super-Cyclone is a development of the earlier St-Just Cyclone and is based on the Cessna 180 and Cessna 185 airframe design. The kit manufacturer terms it "a replica" of the Cessna designs. Like the 180/185 it features a strut-braced high-wing, a four seat enclosed cabin accessed via doors, fixed conventional landing gear, skis or floats and a single engine in tractor configuration.[1][3][4]

The aircraft is made from sheet 2024-T3 aluminum, with some parts made from 6061-T6 and 7075-T6. Its 38.1 ft (11.6 m) extended-span wing employs a NACA 2412 airfoil, has an area of 191 sq ft (17.7 m2) and mounts large slotted flaps. The aircraft can be equipped with engines ranging from 200 to 350 hp (149 to 261 kW). The standard engine used is the 300 hp (224 kW) Continental IO-520 four-stroke powerplant. The design includes improvements over the Cessna, including vertically hinged doors and longer span flaps combined with shorter span ailerons, in a similar manner to the Cessna 206.[1][3][4][5]

Operational history[edit]

In December 2013 there were six Super-Cyclones on the Transport Canada Civil Aircraft Register and one registered with the US Federal Aviation Administration.[6][7]

Specifications (Super-Cyclone)[edit]

St-Just Super-Cyclone on amphibious floats

Data from Bayerl, Kitplanes and St-Just Aviation[1][2][4]

General characteristics

  • Crew: one
  • Capacity: four passengers
  • Length: 38 ft (12 m)
  • Wingspan: 38 ft 1 in (11.6 m)
  • Wing area: 191.0 sq ft (17.74 m2)
  • Empty weight: 1,800 lb (816 kg)
  • Gross weight: 3,500 lb (1,588 kg)
  • Fuel capacity: 340 litres (75 imp gal; 90 US gal)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Continental IO-520 six cylinder, air-cooled, four stroke aircraft engine, 300 hp (220 kW)
  • Propellers: 3-bladed constant speed

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 174 mph; 151 kn (280 km/h)
  • Cruising speed: 165 mph; 143 kn (265 km/h)
  • Stall speed: 43 mph; 38 kn (70 km/h)
  • Range: 1,151 mi; 1,852 km (1,000 nmi)
  • Rate of climb: 1,600 ft/min (8.1 m/s)
  • Wing loading: 18.3 lb/sq ft (89.5 kg/m2)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Bayerl, Robby; Martin Berkemeier; et al: World Directory of Leisure Aviation 2011-12, page 120. WDLA UK, Lancaster UK, 2011. ISSN 1368-485X
  2. ^ a b Downey, Julia: 2005 Kit Aircraft Directory, Kitplanes, Volume 21, Number 12, December 2004, page 53. Belvoir Publications. ISSN 0891-1851
  3. ^ a b c Purdy, Don: AeroCrafter - Homebuilt Aircraft Sourcebook, Fifth Edition, page 257 BAI Communications, 15 July 1998. ISBN 0-9636409-4-1
  4. ^ a b c St-Just Aviation (n.d.). "Kits". Retrieved 20 October 2012. 
  5. ^ Downey, Julia: 1999 Kit Aircraft Directory, Kitplanes, Volume 15, Number 12, December 1998, page 66. Primedia Publications. ISSN 0891-1851
  6. ^ Transport Canada (17 December 2013). "Canadian Civil Aircraft Register". Retrieved 17 December 2013. 
  7. ^ Federal Aviation Administration (17 December 2013). "Make / Model Inquiry Results". Retrieved 17 December 2013. 

External links[edit]