St. Aidan's Church of England High School

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St. Aidan's Church of England High School
DCP 1964.JPG
Established 18 June 1966
Type Academy
Religion Church of England
Head Teacher John Wood
Chair of Governors Claire Kelley
Specialism Science
Modern Foreign Languages
Location Oatlands Drive
Harrogate
North Yorkshire
HG2 8JR
England Coordinates: 53°59′05″N 1°31′22″W / 53.984800°N 1.522800°W / 53.984800; -1.522800
Local authority North Yorkshire
Students 1,893
Gender Mixed
Ages 11–18
Colours Blue & Yellow
Grades

A-Level - 61% A-B[1]

GCSE - 93% A*-C[2]
Website School website

St. Aidan's Church of England High School is a mixed Church of England school with academy status in Harrogate, North Yorkshire, England. It currently houses over 1800 students of both lower school and sixth form age. The school's Chamber Choir won the 2006 Songs of Praise School Choir of the Year Competition. After their next compete in Songs of Praise 2010, they landed second place.[citation needed]

The school was labelled as "outstanding"[3] by an Ofsted report in October 2006. It is ranked 475th in the country[4] for its GCSE results in 2006 by The Times.

History[edit]

The former Bishop of Ripon, the Right Reverend John Moorman, laid its foundation stone on 18 June 1966. It opened in September 1966 to provide Church of England education for Harrogate's fast-growing population.[5] Since then, it has grown in pupil numbers.[citation needed]

Building work[edit]

The school building has grown. The most notable is perhaps the Constance Green Hall. It was built adjacent to Bede House, a building converted for the school's use, and opened in 1997. More recently, a fully re-furbished Learning resources centre, with approximately 15000 resources[clarification needed] and 42 computer workstations[6] opened in May 2006 with a "Beatles Night", featuring the tribute group, the Plastic Beatles, and a transgender Cilla Black tribute act.

Other building work included completely refurbishing the sixth form cafe area and the old chapel and replacing the bottom tennis courts near the music block with classrooms and a new chapel. The barn was replaced by new tennis courts.[7] In September 2007, the lecture theatre was replaced by a Dance studio for pupils studying Dance.

Awards[edit]

The school was made one of the first Beacon Schools in 1998. It has Specialist College Science Status.[8] It won the International Schools Award from the British Council in 2006. The school recently received specialist Languages College Status, and has followed this up with a series of Languages Days for both students of both primary and secondary level.

Music[edit]

There are over 20 ensembles run by staff and students with the senior ensembles winning various national competitions.[citation needed] The Chamber Choir has appeared in the BBC Songs of Praise School Choirs Competition several times, winning in 2006.[citation needed] The Symphonic Band and Swing Band have won their classes at the National Festival of Music for Youth twice each and the Symphonic Band have also gained a Silver Award in the National Concert Band Championships in 2009 held in Cardiff.[citation needed]

Sixth form[edit]

The school forms part of an associated sixth form with St. John Fisher Catholic High School.

Notable faculty[edit]

Dennis Richards, headteacher 1988-2011,[9] was awarded an OBE in 2007 for services to education.[10] He also won the Ted Wragg Award for Lifetime Achievement at the 2007 Teaching Awards.[11] On 31 December 2011 it was announced that the former Deputy Head of St Aidan's Mr Steve Hatcher had been awarded an MBE for services to education in the Queen's New Year's Honours list.[12]

Sport[edit]

Jonathan Webb was a pupil at this school between 2001-2008 and an integral part of the football team's success in the North Yorkshire School Football circuit and at National level. He now plays for Loughborough University FC after a brief professional career at Leeds United and Newcastle Blue Star.

References[edit]

External links[edit]